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Cold chickens.....when to use heat lamp? - Page 23

post #221 of 226

My coop was attacked by a Big Horned Owl which killed two of our hens.  Owl had attacked all our hens pulling out feathers.  Now we noticed that even our flock are loosing more feathers.  We think they are attacking each other starting with the trama they went through with the owl.  Thought about separating all of them until the can calm down.  Does anyone have any ideas?  The Owl ended up in the coop.  This did not happen outside.  Thanks for any help you can give us.

post #222 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post

The old way that you mentioned was to toss the poor darlings out in the cold cold snow and let them dine on what ever they found laying around in the hoof prints of the cow, the horse, and the pig.

There never was a predator problem back then because any and all vermin were shot on sight so as you can imagine adequate ventilation was a non starter because any and all chickens ranged as free and as unrestrained as the Smallpox virus.

The farmers' garden was located far enough away from the house place so that depredations by the chicken flock wasn't an issue, or else hog wire or field fencing was erected to keep the poor darlings at bay.

Never never never forget however that any and all varmints from the smallest to the mightiest were as apt to wind up in the stew pot as was a sliced carrot, diced onion, or a striking hen.

 

Well,  the coop design is over 100yrs old.  I'd say that is a representation of the old way.  Maybe some half a$$ed people just threw their chickens out in the snow.  But not anybody that was in business, and was counting on the eggs, or the birds themselves for food.  

 

Never a predator problem, huh?  Yeah I'm sure every pred was just seen, and shot on sight.  I'm sure way back then nobody lost a bird, in your imagined utopia.   


 

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post #223 of 226
The commercialization of the chicken began about 100 years ago. Up until that time there was first no scientifically formulated feeds to keep laying hens or Spring chickens healthy year round. nor was there any vaccines or other medicines, The only way to accomplish it was to toss the poor poor darlings out into the cold cold snow and force them to fend for themselves. They found enough goodies hiding in the weeds or living in the barnyard dung to stay relatively healthy. That is why no one use to confine their cattle, horses, swine, sheep, etc. Split rail fences instead were erected around every crop field to keep Old Dobbin and Bossy the Cow from eating the crops. The median egg production per hen was about 80 eggs per year or a shade over 6 dozen.

It is what it was and the good old days are better dead and buried.
Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #224 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post
 

 

 

The image below is a good indicator of the relative importance chicken farmers place on good or adequate ventilation.

 

 

 

THIS, is the post I was answering.  You show a modern chicken house/coop, and talk about ventilation.   I, post a pic of a coop, based on a 100yr old design.  Coops. of THAT design were used by commercial poultry farmers.   Although the coops they used were much larger, and could house something like 500 birds, each.

  We were talking about coop ventilation, and you go off on some tangent, about throwing the birds out into the snow, and leaving them to fend for themselves.   Picking through hog and cow crap, to get a meal.   Man, talk about going off subject.  You took a hard left and tied off the wheel.   


Edited by JackE - 2/5/16 at 7:36am


 

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post #225 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackE View Post
 

 

THIS, is the post I was answering.  You show a modern chicken house/coop, and talk about ventilation.   I, post a pic of a coop, based on a 100yr old design.  Coops. of THAT design were used by commercial poultry farmers.   Although the coops they used were much larger, and could house something like 500 birds, each.

  We were talking about coop ventilation, and you go off on some tangent, about throwing the birds out into the snow, and leaving them to fend for themselves.   Picking through hog and cow crap, to get a meal.   Man, talk about going off subject.  You took a hard left and tied off the wheel.   

We were discussing the importance of ventilation in the housing of poultry.  If you will only return a few posts and reread what I said.  What I posted was written with understanding and with a considerable amount of both time and work that involved tending to chickens.  And by the way chickens love no meal better than a fresh warm pile of cow, horse, or hog crap.  If you were a free range chicken up to the middle part of the 20th Century and even continuing to today, Cow, Horse, and Pig poop was what there was for dinner.  Similar to this ad aimed at us humans.  You beef farmers forgive me, but its what's for dinner.  

 

 

Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #226 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJCURETON View Post
 

My coop was attacked by a Big Horned Owl which killed two of our hens.  Owl had attacked all our hens pulling out feathers.  Now we noticed that even our flock are loosing more feathers.  We think they are attacking each other starting with the trama they went through with the owl.  Thought about separating all of them until the can calm down.  Does anyone have any ideas?  The Owl ended up in the coop.  This did not happen outside.  Thanks for any help you can give us.

Big Horned Owls taste JUST like chicken. 

Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
Reply
Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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