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Can I feed my chickens suet? - Page 3

post #21 of 30

I make my own soap and I render suet into tallow for the soap.  Suet is the prime, clean fat around beef kidneys.  It makes a lovely, gentle yet cleansing soap.

To render suet to tallow you need a large pot, salt and water.  But it's much easier if the suet is ground.  I get mine from the meat shop in October when they're processing game and it's already ground up; like hamburger.  I have taken large chunks and put it in the food processor to cut up but what a mess!  Suet is like powdered butter and it will end up everywhere and make a horrible mess.  So now I buy it already ground up and save my sanity.

Put the suet, some water and salt into the pot and bring it to a boil. There needs to be a goodly amount of water.  The objective is to separate out the impurities like bits of muscle or other non-fat stuff from the suet and the boiling water and salt does this.  While this mixture is boiling the suet chunks will shrink and you'll have a layer of fat floating on top of the water.  If the suet is ground finely enough, this happens in a reasonable amount of time.  I've tried to render 1/2 inch chunks of suet which took almost all day!  Do not let the water boil out which it may if there's not enough to start with. 

When it's done, pour this mixture into a pan, or put the pot somewhere where the fat, now tallow, will solidify and separate from the water.  Then you can 'peel' off the tallow and what's left in the water is some cooked chunks of non-fat stuff that the birds like.  You may also have to scrape off the bottom of the tallow slab.  I'll mix this stuff with a little peanut butter and set it out for the birds.

This is probably way more than people want to know about rendering suet.  And I'm not sure why it would need to be rendered for chickens.  They would do well with the bits of meat and things.

One thing to remember if you do try to render suet is that you'll need substantial heat to get things melted.  And fat burns and care must be taken to never leave this unattended because it's hot and dangerous and could potentially catch on fire.  I personally use lots of water with mine and just do extra separation.  It's easier in the winter 'cause I use the outside as a freezer to solidify it.

And if you are a soap maker it is wonderful for soap.

Mary

post #22 of 30

Thanks did not know about the water.  I would have thought it to boil off or boil over with the fat.. Great information

post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by redhen 

Do the suet cakes go bad? I bought some last year and forgot to feed them to the birds..just found them the other day...i cant find an experation date on them either..
Is it safe to feed the birds these?


For store-bought suet cakes, I would unwrap it and sniff it.  If it smells rancid I would toss it.  I say this because while I am new at chickens and ducks, I have fed wild birds forever, and I use the  boughten suet cakes.  I noticed that they can go sour or rancid on us in the summer.  So I figure better safe than sorry.  Give 'em the old sniff test and toss if you need to.

Bridget
Married to MrTea 29 years
Mom to 3 young adults and 1 little kid
A dog, a cat, couple of fish, 2 unidentified banty hens, a Pekin duck and 6 lucky Freedom Rangers
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Bridget
Married to MrTea 29 years
Mom to 3 young adults and 1 little kid
A dog, a cat, couple of fish, 2 unidentified banty hens, a Pekin duck and 6 lucky Freedom Rangers
Reply
post #24 of 30

I keep my suet in the refrigerator and the home-made cakes in the freezer.  You must be careful in summer, I use it during the cooler months.

Focussing on the black Australorp.  Facebook page under Linda Pattison.

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Focussing on the black Australorp.  Facebook page under Linda Pattison.

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post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynneP 

I keep my suet in the refrigerator and the home-made cakes in the freezer.  You must be careful in summer, I use it during the cooler months.


That is exactly what the National Park Service said and where I got the notion that gelatine was a better & more suitable glue for any time of the year.

post #26 of 30

Suet vs Bacon grease?  Hmmm!  Suet gets used here for Roast Beef and Yorkshire pudding,  The bacon grease not used in everday cooking is saved and mixed with Chex cereals and cherios and pretzel sticks and seasoning and peanuts and baked.  Going to have to eat more roast beef and Bacon to make suet cakes.  laudroolingig

2 Laced Wyandotts, 2 Golden Comet, 2 Straight Run Barred Rock, 2 BOs.   
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2 Laced Wyandotts, 2 Golden Comet, 2 Straight Run Barred Rock, 2 BOs.   
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post #27 of 30

I've been trying to feed my chickens grease fryings.  They don't seem to like them. So the dog eats them.

They waste a lot of food also. The part they leave has dark gray small rocks like.- definitely not in their fresh food. It doesn't seem to be droppings. I used a sieve and shook out the grain that looked like the fresh food and they won't eat it.  What's the problem?  and how do I keep them from wasting the feed.?

post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by eggproducer View Post

I've been trying to feed my chickens grease fryings.  They don't seem to like them. So the dog eats them.

They waste a lot of food also. The part they leave has dark gray small rocks like.- definitely not in their fresh food. It doesn't seem to be droppings. I used a sieve and shook out the grain that looked like the fresh food and they won't eat it.  What's the problem?  and how do I keep them from wasting the feed.?

Feed wastage is a completely different but very common issue. I suggest you start a new thread asking the same question. 

post #29 of 30

Same here! We save our meat/poultry & bacon drippings for the chickens & wild birds! They need the extra calories to get through a cold winter!

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by humphrey farms View Post

Same here! We save our meat/poultry & bacon drippings for the chickens & wild birds! They need the extra calories to get through a cold winter!

My hens absolutely LOVE a meaty ham bone hung up in the run. 

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