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SEVERELY Frostbitten Toes - Update **Graphic Pictures** - Page 3

post #21 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlhunicorn 

I am so glad you have aviacharge... you can mix that in with a wee bit of cooked oatmeal and then mix THAT in with their feed , freeing up the water for electrolytes or aspirin.
Ask the avian vet for meloxicam for pain... it can be used longer with less side effects than the aspirin.  Also ask for (topical application) ivermectin ...it will address worms as well as most of those lice.


Unfortunately, they don't recognize oatmeal as food, maybe I'll try sprinkling some crumbles on oatmeal tomorrow.  We did worm them with ivermectin today and switched them over to electrolytes.  The one with the worst frostbite has all kinds of lice eggs stuck to her feathers under her neck, so we'll have to cross that bridge a bit later.

The vet didn't seem to think they needed pain medication and I can't handle another vet bill, so we've decided to leave it at electrolytes.  Their feet (while still looking horribly nasty) are looking better.  There is a bit of pink flesh and the swelling has gone done drastically.  They are getting more active too and are ravenous.  Their poops are looking normal and healthy, never knew I would spend so much of my time looking at chicken crap.

Hopefully all good signs.  Once again, thanks for all the wonderful advice!  smile

If there are no dogs in heaven, then I want to go where they went." - Will Rogers (1879-1935)
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If there are no dogs in heaven, then I want to go where they went." - Will Rogers (1879-1935)
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post #22 of 40

This discussion has shed more light on this issue of frost bite than what I've been able to glean previously from searches and other frost bite threads.

I admire your willingness to rescue these poor little guys and give them such personalized care. It has to be awfully hard watching them try to survive the pain and disability. I'm sure what you're doing, though, will enable them to heal, and they'll end up surprising you with their durability and resiliency.

I've seen photos of badly frostbit chicken feet, and it brings tears to my eyes imagining how painful it must be. This is why I want to learn what conditions cause their feet to freeze. Wild birds don't seem to have this problem, do they?

I understand about combs being highly susceptible, and wattles freezing if they get dunked in a deep water dish, but how on earth do their feet end up freezing?

Keep up the good work, don't get discouraged, they'll pull through before you know it. However, one of the things I've read in my searches is that they'll be way more susceptible to frost bite from now on. I guess you'll just have to subject them to a life of pampering and privilege.

One matronly and regal Light Brahma hen, two Silver-laced Wyandotte hens, two Gold-laced Wyandotte hens, one Black Cochin hen, two EE hens, one timid Buff Brahma hen, four obnoxious Speckled Sussex hens, and five bratty Welsummer hens.
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One matronly and regal Light Brahma hen, two Silver-laced Wyandotte hens, two Gold-laced Wyandotte hens, one Black Cochin hen, two EE hens, one timid Buff Brahma hen, four obnoxious Speckled Sussex hens, and five bratty Welsummer hens.
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post #23 of 40
Thread Starter 

So the two pullets with frostbite are still hanging strong.  The one with the newer frostbite started panting, so we added aspirin to her water.  It's definitely helping her.  Unfortunately, her frostbite has turned out to be worse.  It looks like she will lose all of her foot as you can tell by the following pictures.

These pictures are actually 100% improvement from when we first got them.  The swelling has gone down and remaining live tissue is regaining color.  Before color was grayish, now live tissue is turning pink and yellow again.  The purplish tissue has now/or is the progress of turning black.

They are being kept in a rabbit cage with pine shavings.  Third bird is kept in dog crate next to them.  If they get a clean bill of health from their quarantine (it's been almost a week and they still appear to be healthy) they will most likely live inside until the spring.  Any suggestions on how to wrap the stump on the one are appreciated.  I've had lots of mild frostbite over the years and understand how much frostbite sensitivity can hurt, even years later.  That will be something we will factor in to their upkeep.

**The following pictures are graphic**

Pullet with older frostbite.  She's actually been cruising around a good bit.  Yes that is one of her nails just kind of dangling there.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/27440_imgp2355.jpg
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/27440_imgp2356.jpg

Pullet with newer and obviously worse frostbite.  She'll put weight on it when she walks, but is in discomfort when she does so.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/27440_imgp2360.jpg
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/27440_imgp2362.jpg

If there are no dogs in heaven, then I want to go where they went." - Will Rogers (1879-1935)
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If there are no dogs in heaven, then I want to go where they went." - Will Rogers (1879-1935)
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post #24 of 40

ohhh dear
poor thing
i hope she gets well soon!!!
hugs

Working on a winter hardy, good egg layer, broody, healthy, happy and preety breed of chicken.
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Working on a winter hardy, good egg layer, broody, healthy, happy and preety breed of chicken.
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post #25 of 40

Those lucky girls are very happy to have you.  Even though painful looking, the feet look like they are healing for all the damage done and I think you are doing a fabulous job.  thumbsup     bow

Vet wrap would be good to help wrap the foot it will not stick to her leg but will conform and can be cut off easily.  Also maybe if her foot becomes a peg leg, those rubber finger tips (sometimes used to count money) might fit her and offer a bit of protection.  Or maybe a disc of memory foam. 

hugs

Fowl adventures happening daily       

"Poultry- they may be your pets, they may be your hobby, they may be your livestock. But remember, if you fall down in the pen, unconscious? They WILL eat you." ~ Sally/Ranchie - we miss you.
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Fowl adventures happening daily       

"Poultry- they may be your pets, they may be your hobby, they may be your livestock. But remember, if you fall down in the pen, unconscious? They WILL eat you." ~ Sally/Ranchie - we miss you.
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post #26 of 40

I agree! Those girls are sooooooooo LUCKY you found them!

This has been an extremely beneficial post for me since I have a rooster at the moment who lost blood circulation to one leg. The information is great smile ! I really, really appreciate it!

Poor babies! Good for them you found them :-)

post #27 of 40

I really like the idea of a disc of memory foam.  Maybe you could put that inside the thumb of a glove and vetwrap the top so it stays on?  Maybe it would fit in one of those rubber thingies like the OP said...how about the thumb of a rubber glove? (they even come in yellow!)
I never made anything for Charlie to wear on his stumps--yes he lost both his feet and most of his lower legs.  He did fine for 3 years and just died from complications from an infection this afternoon. (RIP Charlie)  I am sure with your great care you will have some nice pets for a long time!  Terri O in WI

Calling all Wisconsinites....come and enjoy the days of summer with us on the "Cheesehead" thread!  http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=245700

Join us at our yearly Bash! http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/851229/fifth-annual-wicheeseheads-bash


My Motto: " Don't just do it, overdo it"

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Calling all Wisconsinites....come and enjoy the days of summer with us on the "Cheesehead" thread!  http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=245700

Join us at our yearly Bash! http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/851229/fifth-annual-wicheeseheads-bash


My Motto: " Don't just do it, overdo it"

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post #28 of 40
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the great suggestions about wrapping her stump!  I might be back on here asking more questions when we get to that point, but this is a great starting point.

Terrie - once again I'm sorry about Charlie's passing, I was really pulling for him.

If there are no dogs in heaven, then I want to go where they went." - Will Rogers (1879-1935)
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If there are no dogs in heaven, then I want to go where they went." - Will Rogers (1879-1935)
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post #29 of 40

I dont mean to turn this around but can you tell me what happened to the people you got these chickens from?  Do they have any more animals?   Boy I hope not, as far as Im concerned this is crudity to animals and they should be charged with something.  Or it could be they didn't know any better, some people just don't realize.     


Please everyone. I asked the question so dont start a war here with everyone complaining and saying this should be done to them or that should be done to them.   We have enough of those threads on there.   Im just hoping they dont have any more pets.   Because thats a sad thing that happened and could have been avoided.  Remember I said PLEASE.

PA Certified and Licensed Poultry Technician
http://www.amway.com/onestepatatime    Billie is my daughter.  Thanks for looking 
http://www.facebook.com/groups/170486856348596/?view=permalink&id=193500054047276#!/groups/170486856348596/
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PA Certified and Licensed Poultry Technician
http://www.amway.com/onestepatatime    Billie is my daughter.  Thanks for looking 
http://www.facebook.com/groups/170486856348596/?view=permalink&id=193500054047276#!/groups/170486856348596/
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post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by hen-thusiast 

Thanks for the great suggestions about wrapping her stump!  I might be back on here asking more questions when we get to that point, but this is a great starting point.

Terrie - once again I'm sorry about Charlie's passing, I was really pulling for him.


When my rooster got to the point yours is in in the picture we used a vitamin E cream then wrapped with non  stick gauze, then regular gauze and then vet wrap to keep it all in place and when they step in their poo it won't get into the wounds.  One of my roo's lost both his feet a little higher up than yours and the second one just lost the toes. Several of my hens have lost the tips of their toes but I'm not sure if it was due to frost bite.  After the dead parts fell off the roo's and they were completely healed they had no problems getting around, they adapted quite well. It also seemed to mellow them out.

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