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How do you tell a goose from a gander?

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 

We have four Toulouse geese, but I have no idea which are ganders and which are geese.  How do you tell?

post #2 of 35

Usually by their behaviour and also their faces.  Ganders have chubbier cheeks, and just look more masculine in the face (like a drake).  Geese have more refined faces.  Ganders are typically more aggressive also, unless it is laying season.

Mama to a Bloodhound, a Labradork, a GSP, 2 Black Mouth Curs; a cat; Lav Silkies; Chocolate OEGBs; Pekin Ducks; Embden and American Blue Geese; Bourbon Red turkeys; guineas; dairy goats; and 4 Quarter Horses! 

Working on rebuilding my Orpingtons after a bobcat wipeout.
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Mama to a Bloodhound, a Labradork, a GSP, 2 Black Mouth Curs; a cat; Lav Silkies; Chocolate OEGBs; Pekin Ducks; Embden and American Blue Geese; Bourbon Red turkeys; guineas; dairy goats; and 4 Quarter Horses! 

Working on rebuilding my Orpingtons after a bobcat wipeout.
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post #3 of 35
Thread Starter 

Chubbier cheeks?  Oh, gee, I was hoping it was more obvious than that.  I guess I may have to wait until they start laying to figure it out.

When do geese start laying?  I'm in Maine, so spring comes rather late (May is Maine's April).

And do geese mate for life?  Or will a gander mate with more than one goose?

post #4 of 35

You can vent sex them also, or usually an easier way is to tell by their attitude and mannerisms. Ganders often walk around with their neck stretch way up high, while keep a close eye on you or they may come towards you with their neck down and stretched out forward towards you hissing. Especially this time of the year as they are getting close to breeding season.

Vicki
4 kids, 4 house dogs, 6 cats, 2 mini goats, 14 rabbits, 8 Welsummers, 12 Seramas,  6 Welsh Harlequins, 2 horses, a tortoise and a pair of Maremma's guarding them all!
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Vicki
4 kids, 4 house dogs, 6 cats, 2 mini goats, 14 rabbits, 8 Welsummers, 12 Seramas,  6 Welsh Harlequins, 2 horses, a tortoise and a pair of Maremma's guarding them all!
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post #5 of 35

You can DNA sex them too.  It is only about $20 and extremely accurate, so for more expensive birds it is sometimes worth it.  It is also very easy to do, especially if you do the feather method.

http://avianbiotech.com/

post #6 of 35

If you watch them closely you should be able to pick up on the differences
in both size and behavior. Look at feet and beaks which tend to be slightly bigger
and courser in ganders.
Gander voices are higher pitched than females.
Domestic geese are NOT monogamous contrary to popular belief.
The breeding season in northern climates usually begins mid February.
Sooner of later they will either lay eggs or not, then you'll know. wink


Edited by Cottage Rose - 1/23/10 at 4:18pm

Quality white & saddleback Sebastopol Geese.
 

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Quality white & saddleback Sebastopol Geese.
 

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post #7 of 35
Thread Starter 

vicki2x2, How do you vent sex them?

CityChicker, they weren't expensive, so I don't think we'll do that.  Interesting to know it's possible, though.  I have a feeling it might be easier getting a feather than getting close enough to vent check. roll

Cottage Rose, there is one out of the four that hisses and stretches its neck.  I was wondering if that was the only gander.  Would there be a dominant one, or would all of them act the same way if there's more than one?  The hissy one looks smaller, though.  Hmm.

I'm surprised that ganders have a higher voice.  I'd think it would be the other way around.  No bias there, eh?

post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosawoodsii 

Cottage Rose, there is one out of the four that hisses and stretches its neck.  I was wondering if that was the only gander.  Would there be a dominant one, or would all of them act the same way if there's more than one?  The hissy one looks smaller, though.  Hmm.
I'm surprised that ganders have a higher voice.  I'd think it would be the other way around.  No bias there, eh?


Yes ganders tend to extend their neck out and hiss.
You could just have a small gander.

Quality white & saddleback Sebastopol Geese.
 

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Quality white & saddleback Sebastopol Geese.
 

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post #9 of 35

After reading all of this, I realize that I've named the Africans opposite of what they should be named.  Hansel is the goose and Gretel is the gander.  I think.

"Not to hurt our humble brethren is our first duty to them, but to stop there is not enough. We have a higher mission---to be of service to them wherever they require it."
----St. Francis of Assisi
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"Not to hurt our humble brethren is our first duty to them, but to stop there is not enough. We have a higher mission---to be of service to them wherever they require it."
----St. Francis of Assisi
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post #10 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowbrook 

After reading all of this, I realize that I've named the Africans opposite of what they should be named.  Hansel is the goose and Gretel is the gander.  I think.


I'm glad I'm not the only one that was confused. lol

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