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question about comb dominance...

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm just wondering if anyone knows which comb types are dominant to which others.  The only info I have found on here is that pea combs are dominant to single combs.  I was just wondering about other combs, such as rose comb, etc.  Is there a chart somewhere to look this type of thing up?

Thanks,
Jen

Jenny: wife to 1 great husband, mom of 3 boys, 1 dog (lab), 6 cats and 19 chickens (variety of Barred rock, sex links, EE, wyandottes, RIR, australorp, orpington and banty polish)...
New chicks!: FBC marans, blue ameraucanas, Speckled Sussex, Welsummer, lakenvelder, leghorns, cornish, brahma, cochin, s. faverolles and EE. 
Getting some buckeyes, barnevelders and marans this summer...
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Jenny: wife to 1 great husband, mom of 3 boys, 1 dog (lab), 6 cats and 19 chickens (variety of Barred rock, sex links, EE, wyandottes, RIR, australorp, orpington and banty polish)...
New chicks!: FBC marans, blue ameraucanas, Speckled Sussex, Welsummer, lakenvelder, leghorns, cornish, brahma, cochin, s. faverolles and EE. 
Getting some buckeyes, barnevelders and marans this summer...
Reply
post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaSombra 

I'm just wondering if anyone knows which comb types are dominant to which others.  The only info I have found on here is that pea combs are dominant to single combs.  I was just wondering about other combs, such as rose comb, etc.  Is there a chart somewhere to look this type of thing up?

Thanks,
Jen


Rose comb is dominant over single comb

pea comb is incompletely dominant over single comb

single comb is incompletely dominant over duplex comb (V comb)

Rose comb and pea comb combine to make a walnut comb,

Tim




 

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post #3 of 19

walnut = RRPP, RrPP, RrPp
rosecomb = RRpp, Rrpp
single = rrpp
pea = rrPP, rrPp

The difference between pets and pests is only on which side of the fence they're standing... keep your animals in your own property.

 

 



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The difference between pets and pests is only on which side of the fence they're standing... keep your animals in your own property.

 

 



http://s15.photobucket.com/albums... 

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post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

hm. interesting.  amazing that a single comb is recessive to the other types and, yet, so much more common.  I realize it's because people have bred them that way but still interesting.

Thanks for the info big_smile

Jenny: wife to 1 great husband, mom of 3 boys, 1 dog (lab), 6 cats and 19 chickens (variety of Barred rock, sex links, EE, wyandottes, RIR, australorp, orpington and banty polish)...
New chicks!: FBC marans, blue ameraucanas, Speckled Sussex, Welsummer, lakenvelder, leghorns, cornish, brahma, cochin, s. faverolles and EE. 
Getting some buckeyes, barnevelders and marans this summer...
Reply
Jenny: wife to 1 great husband, mom of 3 boys, 1 dog (lab), 6 cats and 19 chickens (variety of Barred rock, sex links, EE, wyandottes, RIR, australorp, orpington and banty polish)...
New chicks!: FBC marans, blue ameraucanas, Speckled Sussex, Welsummer, lakenvelder, leghorns, cornish, brahma, cochin, s. faverolles and EE. 
Getting some buckeyes, barnevelders and marans this summer...
Reply
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaSombra 

hm. interesting.  amazing that a single comb is recessive to the other types and, yet, so much more common.  I realize it's because people have bred them that way but still interesting.


I don't think it's so much because people have bred them that way, as because people have NOT often bred AWAY from it. Remember that single-comb is the wild type characteristic. An enormous number of common traits are recessive, actually.

Also I have some vague recollection (??) that single combed fowl have been shown to have more mating success than <other>-combed ones?



Pat

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patandchickens 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaSombra 

hm. interesting.  amazing that a single comb is recessive to the other types and, yet, so much more common.  I realize it's because people have bred them that way but still interesting.


I don't think it's so much because people have bred them that way, as because people have NOT often bred AWAY from it. Remember that single-comb is the wild type characteristic. An enormous number of common traits are recessive, actually.

Also I have some vague recollection (??) that single combed fowl have been shown to have more mating success than <other>-combed ones?



Pat


hm. good points...

Jenny: wife to 1 great husband, mom of 3 boys, 1 dog (lab), 6 cats and 19 chickens (variety of Barred rock, sex links, EE, wyandottes, RIR, australorp, orpington and banty polish)...
New chicks!: FBC marans, blue ameraucanas, Speckled Sussex, Welsummer, lakenvelder, leghorns, cornish, brahma, cochin, s. faverolles and EE. 
Getting some buckeyes, barnevelders and marans this summer...
Reply
Jenny: wife to 1 great husband, mom of 3 boys, 1 dog (lab), 6 cats and 19 chickens (variety of Barred rock, sex links, EE, wyandottes, RIR, australorp, orpington and banty polish)...
New chicks!: FBC marans, blue ameraucanas, Speckled Sussex, Welsummer, lakenvelder, leghorns, cornish, brahma, cochin, s. faverolles and EE. 
Getting some buckeyes, barnevelders and marans this summer...
Reply
post #7 of 19

I read today that Pea comb (P) is incompletely dominant while Rose comb (R) is completely dominant.

I also read that there is reduced fertility in homozygous RR males; Rr males have normal fertility and out compete their RR counterparts.  This may explain the tendency away from RR.

Still wondering how the cushion comb fits into the equation.


Edited by TimG - 2/1/10 at 8:07am
post #8 of 19

Comb genetics are not so clear cut.
Often you will get a comb that is somewhere inbetween the two different type combs. For example with a rose comb and single comb you often end up with a crappy comb that is really neither one.

As with peacomb and cushion comb. It is said that cushion comb is 60% dominate over peacomb. Again, you generally get a crappy comb the first generation that is not completely either one.

Another example is the single comb x duplex comb cross: the first generation will give you a leaf comb. saladin

NPIP 56-378, AI tested Clean, Farm Inspected by Clemson Poultry
Breeding Orientals,Games and Ducks;
With a large selection of Asil
And the largest flock of Cubalayas east of the Mississippi
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NPIP 56-378, AI tested Clean, Farm Inspected by Clemson Poultry
Breeding Orientals,Games and Ducks;
With a large selection of Asil
And the largest flock of Cubalayas east of the Mississippi
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post #9 of 19

Never heard of a leaf comb.  I think the statement about fertility and single combs is incorrect--the one about RR males, though is accurate.

Breda is the only recessive comb gene.  Duplex is dominant. The v-form (D^V) is the most dominant of the duplex alleles, the cup-form (D^C) is dominant to not-duplex (d+).

Single comb expresses only in the absence of other comb genes, with the exception of breda.

Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

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Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

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post #10 of 19

A leaf comb: is a duplex comb that "leafs" out. In other words it is not like spikes.

NPIP 56-378, AI tested Clean, Farm Inspected by Clemson Poultry
Breeding Orientals,Games and Ducks;
With a large selection of Asil
And the largest flock of Cubalayas east of the Mississippi
Reply
NPIP 56-378, AI tested Clean, Farm Inspected by Clemson Poultry
Breeding Orientals,Games and Ducks;
With a large selection of Asil
And the largest flock of Cubalayas east of the Mississippi
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