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unwashed eggs......

post #1 of 16
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How long can you leave unwashed eggs out of fridge?

 

 

  

 

 

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post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstricer 

How long can you leave unwashed eggs out of fridge?


Forever...

Now, If you want them to be edible or not is a different story... lol

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post #3 of 16

-Can't say exactly, but it's long enough not to worry about it. I guess I would consider a month to be safe. In many other countries eggs aren't refrigerated at all. In or out of the fridge they should be stored unwashed.

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post #4 of 16

Honestly, I never refrigerate my eggs. Unless they're washed or cracked they don't rot, even in hot weather. Now, they DO evaporate, and I have boiled 2 month old eggs and had only a half an egg left in the shell when it was all said and done. It makes sense if you think about it, chickens always lay eggs and if the ones that don't get set just rotted there would be a lot of rotting eggs running around. And have you ever noticed that if a chicken sees egg yolk they slurp it up in an instant? Maybe a defense mechanism, cause a spoiled egg in a nest is a sure way to attract attention from chicken eating things. I dunno, that's my speculation on the matter.

Also, if you're unsure if an egg is rotten or not, just sniff the shell. You'll know if it's bad!

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Every Knee Shall Bow, Every Tongue Confess: JESUS CHRIST IS LORD (Phillipians 2:10)

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post #5 of 16

If an egg is old almost always it will float aswell!  (Bigger air cell) If you spin a boiled egg and a raw egg the boiled egg will spin faster. The yolk sloshes around in the raw egg and absorbs most of the energy. The solid egg will spin faster.

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post #6 of 16

I lived in Mexico for a while with a family and even in the hot weather, the eggs were never put in the fridge.  They just sat on the kitchen counter.
Never had a "bad" egg.

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Don't want it...We'll take it = Land of Lost Toys!
2 Arabians...Solo & Moonshine, 2 inside Cats...Clyde & Emily, 3 Barn Cats...Dewey, Trey, & Stevie, and 1 BR Hen, 1 EE Hen, 1 GB Hen, and 4 Silver Leghorns
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post #7 of 16

According to a controlled test that Mother Earth News did awhile ago, unwashed fresh eggs were fine after a month, and although slightly past their prime were still edible after eight weeks.  At 12 weeks they were still edible, but didn't taste great.

The entire article is here: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/1977-11-01/Fresh-Eggs.aspx and is well worth reading.

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post #8 of 16

Why would you not wash eggs if they are soiled a little?  Should I not be doing this and for what reason?

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Black Copper Marans, Welsummers, Speckled Sussex, Delawares, Easter Eggers, Ducks (Silver Appleyard, Welsh Harlequin, Cayuga) Alpacas, cows, Anatolian Shepard dogs, barn cats
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post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingdragon 

Why would you not wash eggs if they are soiled a little?  Should I not be doing this and for what reason?


When you wash an egg you remove the bloom, a protective coating of sorts that the hen applies to the egg during the laying process.  With the bloom intact, dirt and germs are sealed out.  Without the bloom, they spoil faster.
ETA:  If you must wash an egg, it is best to do so in water at least 20 degrees warmer than the egg itself.  Cold water causes the pores in the eggshell to contract, pulling exterior dirt and germs into the egg.  Warm water causes the pores to open, pushing the dirt to the outside.


Edited by gritsar - 2/16/10 at 4:12pm

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If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, bredas and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

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post #10 of 16

Mine usually sit on the counter for a few days before I wash them.  After they are washed they get refridgerated till sold or eaten.

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Mom to 10 barn cats, 2 Rhode Island Reds, 4 bunnies, 10 new chicks, 1 great Hubby, 8 grown kids (his and hers), and my darling 16 grandchildren.

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