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Black spots in Eggs?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

One of the ladies at my work says she loves free range eggs but they always have black spots in them. She said she gets eggs from two relatives, the eggs from chickens that are kept in a run are fine but the eggs from the free range chickens have black spots in them. She thought they were bugs? I know they cant be bugs but what else could they be?

Lacie
Mommy, Son, Min Pin, English Setter and a Mixed Flock of chickens, turkeys and ducks
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Lacie
Mommy, Son, Min Pin, English Setter and a Mixed Flock of chickens, turkeys and ducks
Reply
post #2 of 5

Blood spots

Description
Blood spots vary from barely distinguishable spots on the surface of the yolk to heavy blood contamination throughout the yolk. Occasionally blood may be diffused through the albumen or white of the egg.


Meat spots

Description
Most meat spots are pieces of tissue from body organs, but some may be partially broken-down blood spots. They are usually brown in colour, and found in the thick albumen, chalazae, or the yolk. They range in size from 0.5 mm to more than 3 mm in diameter.
Incidence
The incidence of meat spots ranges from less than 3% to 30% or more. It varies with the strain of bird, increases with the age of bird and may be higher in brown eggs. Many meat spots are too small to be detected by candling, especially in brown eggs. Less than 1% of eggs are usually downgraded because of meat spots.

I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
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I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
post #3 of 5

I agree sounds like meat spots.  It has nothing to do with them free ranging, more likely the breed or the individual chicken.

I've been free ranging my flock for almost two years now and have seen one meat spot.

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

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If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

Reply
post #4 of 5

Can the spots be removed and the the eggs eaten with or wothout removing the spots?

post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dooner 

Can the spots be removed and the the eggs eaten with or wothout removing the spots?


Yeah, you can just spoon them out.  I used to, but don't anymore if I am making scrambled eggs.  For asthetic reasons I still remove them if I am frying eggs sunny side up.

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

Reply

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

Reply
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