BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Miscellaneous › Other Pets & Livestock › A BEE thread....for those interested in beekeeping.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A BEE thread....for those interested in beekeeping. - Page 222

post #2211 of 2216

@Beekissed

 

Just wondering if you're getting any activity on your hive this spring.

Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

Reply

Do Not Wait to Honor and Learn from Those Who Have Experience.  Then, in Turn, Pass it To Others Because....

"When an Elder Dies, a Library Burns to the Ground"  (Old African Saying)

Reply
post #2212 of 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Egghead_Jr View Post
 

Allergies is an important issue. It's noted that bee family children have ten times the chance of being allergic to bee venom than the average population. The reason for this is we coddle our children. I'm not being facetious. The body needs to be in balance or allergies develop- the proteins from bees are carried into the house where everyone is exposed and if not balanced by venom will lead to an imbalance and allergic reaction when too high of bee proteins are in the body and a person is finally stung. 

 

Beekeeping families are learning this and keep beekeeping clothes and boots separate from home and ensure if young children are aiding or around hives that they get stung a few times a year. Mike Palmer goes as far as suggesting monthly sting treatments during the beekeeping season as a countermeasure for children. Those of us tending hives certainly get enough of both. On the flip side allergies can start from massive one time stings and not enough protein in the body. So be sure to be suited up if your opening the hives for the first time this spring!

 

Very interesting and informative.

I'm new to bee's and kids (well of my own.) But am known not to coddle. Thanks for the info.

Howdy to all. Dark Cornish LF,  Cornish bantams, a few guineas and whatever else the coons didn't eat. Plus my quarter horses, goats and Zebu. Have a DELIGHTFUL day.

       Every day above ground is a good day. Some people didn't get that privilege this morning.

Reply

Howdy to all. Dark Cornish LF,  Cornish bantams, a few guineas and whatever else the coons didn't eat. Plus my quarter horses, goats and Zebu. Have a DELIGHTFUL day.

       Every day above ground is a good day. Some people didn't get that privilege this morning.

Reply
post #2213 of 2216

Here's a short video with Mike talking about it some, if memory serves me his daughter gained an allergy and this is him restating what the doctor told him: 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0QB96RrGdM

 

From there go on and check out all his videos and presentations. Very informative and innovative fella.

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

Reply
post #2214 of 2216
Hello all!
Can anyone recommend a place to buy mason and leafcutter bees?
Oh and I live in Alabama...
Thanks!
Edited by RollTideChicken - 4/19/17 at 10:43am
post #2215 of 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChocolateMouse View Post

My hive came in this week. smile.png Looks like the windowed version was purchased for me, which is fun because I will be able to see into the hives to check for obvious problems without opening them. It also came with a smoker, a veil, a bee brush, gloves and a hive tool. So I'm pretty much all set! Just gotta assemble the hive itself. The hive also came with exact piece dimensions and instructions for building the hive so I can build extra boxes whenever I need. Very excited!
that is awesome, we put observation window's in 3 of our hives . I wish we would have done them all. You are going to have so much fun
post #2216 of 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebrascora View Post


style="display:inline-block;">@noble


That's really interesting. I'm wondering if there is much migratory beekeeping in your area (bees pollenating early crops....fruit or nuts perhaps) that would cause so many swarms to be looking for homes in February, although I imagine your climate is almost sub tropical compared to the temperate climate I am used to....swarms here don't emerge until May-June.
I also wonder if they have evolved to recognise trailers as a good potential home rather than hollow trees etc Trailers obviously provide a beneficial environment for them in your climate and bees recognise their home by sight, so it would make sense that they would recognise a trailer as a good potential home when they are out scouting for a new one. I wonder if there is any basis for a new hive design based on the construction of trailers.
After hurricane Katrina a lot of the trailer s were abandoned, and a lot of tree's were damaged by the storm and standing water. We have a lot of orange groves here. And a lot of the farmers have hives, funny thing is no one around here collet's the bee's. I spoke to a man in Alabama about them when we started last year. None of the local community clubs in New Orleans ever answered me back.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Other Pets & Livestock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Miscellaneous › Other Pets & Livestock › A BEE thread....for those interested in beekeeping.