BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Incubating & Hatching Eggs › When can you feed a newborn chick?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

When can you feed a newborn chick?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

A kind, old clerk at Ace Hardware told me not to feed my newly hatched chicks for at least 24 hours.  So, I've been doing that for the most part.

I had a chick take forever to hatch.  I almost intervened, but decided not to.  After about 30 hrs., the chick finally hatched and I put her in the no food box (around 4 p.m).  The next day around 11 a.m., I found her dead.

Now, I'm wondering if that guy was right or not.  Perhaps she dehydrated.  Or perhaps she just wasn't strong enough to survive.  hu

Did he give me good direction?

BTW, an update to those who may know about my hatching fiasco over the past two weeks...I have successfully hatched about 4 or 5 chicks in my incubator.  I've sectioned off the coop  and will be putting the two week old chicks in with the flock--well protected of course.  I now have 14 baby chicks all safe and sound!

yippiechickie

post #2 of 5

More than likely she worked herself to death. You can not feed them for 24 hours but once you take them out of the incubator I would feed and water them asap. I take mine out as they hatch but that is when I turn the heat up and can open the bator without losing heat or moisture. I feed them but they go straight for the water and they learn to eat almost  as soon after words.

post #3 of 5

I've always had food and water waiting for them in the brooder.   Some go to eating and drinking right away while others don't.

I'm a Farmer/Rancher  Wife,Mom & Grandma  No Farms, No food. 
If you want house chickens and ducks in diapers then this is the forum for you.
I've got 50+ years of poultry experience, but this 'poultry' forum isn't for me anymore.
If you're going to complain about farmers, don't do it with a full belly or a mouthful.
Reply
I'm a Farmer/Rancher  Wife,Mom & Grandma  No Farms, No food. 
If you want house chickens and ducks in diapers then this is the forum for you.
I've got 50+ years of poultry experience, but this 'poultry' forum isn't for me anymore.
If you're going to complain about farmers, don't do it with a full belly or a mouthful.
Reply
post #4 of 5

Newly hatched chicks can go about 3 days with no food and water.  That way they can stay in the nest until Mama has finished the hatch or they can be mailed.  I doubt the lack of food or water killed the chick.  Sometimes they are just not strong enough to survive.  I'm assuming your temperatures were in the correct range.

Although they can go without food or water for several days, why would you want them to?  I always put mine in the brooder with food and water as soon as I can after the hatch is over.  I let them dry out first, of course.  They don't immediately eat of drink a lot, but they do eat an ddrink.  I seriously doubt Mama would wait for 24 hours once they were dry and she considered the hatch over.  I'm suspecting an old wives tale.  Hopefully someone can explain how they benefit from not eating or drinking and put me in my place?

Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought....Abraham Lincoln (Freedom carries responsibility)

The spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right.....Judge Learned Hand  (The more sure your are that your way is the only right way, the more likely you are wrong.)

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply

Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought....Abraham Lincoln (Freedom carries responsibility)

The spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right.....Judge Learned Hand  (The more sure your are that your way is the only right way, the more likely you are wrong.)

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Hey, thanks for the words of wisdom.

the guy said the digestive track in a baby chick isn't ready for food.  He said he knew of a woman that put food in the bator and killed all the baby chicks that had just been born.  He said they will "feed" off the egg cord.

I think I'll just put them directly with the others after they are completely dry.

Cute story, tho'.  Our oldest chick who has quite a few of his wing feathers loves to fly and land on the edge of the brooder.  He flew into the "no food" box and hovered over a new chick from the bator.  He stayed with her until we moved her in with the others.  We call him Eagle cause he loves to fly back and forth.  I'm pretty sure he's a roo the way he protects the others.
smile

Thanks everyone!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Incubating & Hatching Eggs
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Incubating & Hatching Eggs › When can you feed a newborn chick?