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Chicken was left outside in snow, any way to save it? - Page 2

post #11 of 16

Awww, sad

Good luck!

SBF

Becoming self-sufficient, one day at a time!
Use it up, Wear it out, make it do or do without.
As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.
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Becoming self-sufficient, one day at a time!
Use it up, Wear it out, make it do or do without.
As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.
Reply
post #12 of 16

...or sugar water if you have no gatorade.

Good luck!

post #13 of 16

How is she doing? I dont know but I dont think she can digest food untill her body is completely warm, I would try sugar water with vites  love  warm water


Edited by tiki244 - 2/23/08 at 9:32am
~Kris~
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~Kris~
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post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

Update: She's perked up a bit, moving her head around, grooming.  She pooed, and the stool was very liquidy.  I gave her some warm water with sugar, but she isn't drinking, even when I put her beak in.  I got a closer look at her feet, they look okay from on top, but turn red and white on the bottom.  Is that frostbite?

Edit:  Gave her some bread, she ate it up fast as she could.  Still won't drink.


Edited by temporaryaccount - 2/23/08 at 10:06am
post #15 of 16

Your birds FIRST needs to be warmed up before she will be able to take in water to rehydrate (and also for shock) much less feed (Bird Rescue orgs always stress NEVER attempt to rehydrate or feed a bird with hypothermia! FIRST get her warmed up THEN rehydrate THEN feed).  You can put her in a cardboard box to protect from draft which is very important (the cardboard is very insulating too)....if you have a hot water bottle put that under the shavings (or a sock filled with rice and warmed up in the microwave) ...
She needs proper electrolytes to recover from the shock ...
Please see my post (link below) with advice on rehydration  :
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=34107&p=5

Once she has perked up and you are seeing her drink then you can think about feeding her... this should nOT be dry feed...make it moist with some cooked oatmeal and serve it warm (not hot)... you can also give her four drops of POLYVISOL (liquid childrens vitamins) into her beak once a day for a week.  If whe begins to show any further symptoms then post those but at this time when she is in shock and hypothermic the above needs to be done first.  please do not give her anymore sugarwater... in many instances it can actually exacerbate dehydration.

ETA:  here is the main portion of that post re REHYDRATION and ELECTROLYTES (and I wish to stress that the electrolytes must be given lukewarm:

One thing I can say though is that I think your bird is dehydrated.  I am glad you have moved the bird to a warmer place as this will ease its burden by not having to use resources to keep warm.  Please note that ill birds (particularly with respiratory distress) should have a humidity of at LEAST 70%... protect from DRAFT...
With panting/gasping, birds have a physiological responce of acidosis and NEED electrolytes (it should also be at a lukewarm temperature) until you get the dehydration sorted out your bird will remain unable to properly process nutrition (and meds)... a "bit of salt and sugar"is insufficient  IMHO here so you need a proper electrolyte really and I suggest you get a commercial brand (look at your feed sotre for DURVET > dosage:
(source: DURVET)
http://p098.ezboard.com/fbackyardchicke =113.topic
If you have the 4 oz. packet of Vitamins and Electrolytes then you would mix ½ teaspoon into 1 gallon of water.

If you have the 8 oz. packet of Vitamins and Electrolytes then you would mix ¾ teaspoon into 1 gallon of water "

If you absolutely cannot find a proper commercial electrolyte (and remember you also have the option of subcutaneous admin of RINGERS solution if you can get that from a vet or other source) then here is an emergency "recipe" to make yourself but you MUST not delete or substitute any of the ingredients (for instance substitute glucose/cornsyrup with table sugar) here it is:
From "Practical Wildlife Care" by Les Stocker:
It is possible to mix your own equivalent oral rehydrating salts by using the following ingredients:

7g sodium chloride (NaCl, common salt)
5g sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)
3g potassium chloride (commonly called "Muriate of Potash". Salt substitutes contain mostly potassium chloride)
40g glucose (a common source is corn syrup)
2 litres water

The solution must be mixed thoroughly and discarded after 24 hours..."

Rehydrating your bird is the first step to getting her better...  after rehydration and some nutrition (we discussed the handfeeding formula


)


Edited by dlhunicorn - 2/23/08 at 10:13am
post #16 of 16
Something similar happened to my silkie rooster, although not overnight but stayed out during a snowstorm for 12 hours at work. I brought him in and warmed him up he will eat and drink but he won't raise his head for long. Keeps rubbing his head on the ground...? It was cold and his head feathers had been iced up a little but I don't see anything that looks like frostbite. Could it be his feet? He stands and walks around... any ideas what it is or what to look for? Thanks
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