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cornish x, can't stand - Page 2

post #11 of 25

Good job, Charlene, you got the first one done!

You know to let the meat rest at least one day before you cook it, right? Otherwise, it can be tough from rigor. Though with a 6 week old bird, it may not make much difference. I'd wait anyway, just to be sure.

Jenny-the-Bear (grrr)
Do not meddle with the forces of nature, for you are small, insignificant, and biodegradable.
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Jenny-the-Bear (grrr)
Do not meddle with the forces of nature, for you are small, insignificant, and biodegradable.
Reply
post #12 of 25

Very nice Charlene!  That's a great confidence builder.  The first time I raised meaties, I wasn't sure how I was going to deal with the processing aspect.  I was a bit stressed about it but I was thrown into it one day with one that looked so miserable.  He was fine in evening but in the morning he couldn't walk and was so hungry that he was trying to move by using his wings to pull himself along the ground.  I just knew I had to deal with him right then so I didn't have a lot of time that I was tormented over doing the deed.  After I was done, I knew I could take care of the rest when it came to harvesting day.

Dan

post #13 of 25

I know this thread is old but I have to reply.  I am new to the chicken scene and recently bought 6 "assorted" chicks.  One of which is a Cornish Cross.  I didn't know what I was getting myself into!  Poor Dumplin, my monster chick is growing so fast that she can hardly walk.  She looks deformed compared to the other chicks and I know she's not comfortable......I don't even want to know what her internal organs are going through.  I'm not any kind of activist but I just think it is WRONG to breed animals to be this helpless and I feel sick just looking at her each day.  I wanted some chickens for egg production and actually I'm glad to have the experience of raising Dumplin because in her honor I have become a vegetarian.  I can't even stand to look at cooked chicken, or chicken in the grocery store anymore.  I know people are demanding bigger and bigger but the nutrition suffers in exchange, as well as the animal.  As for commercially raised chickens....it's the stuff of nightmares.  Although I can't face eating chicken any more, I applaude those who are raising their own meat chickens and sparing them the further torture of commercial facilities.  Their short lives are torure enough, at least let them see some sunlight before they go to table.

post #14 of 25

Congrats on your first processing!  I know that sounds soooo sick, but the first one is always the hardest.  Looking back through your post, I have one question that I ask (I breed Basenji's) other dog owners when they ask me 'How do I know when it's time?';  it's 'Who are you keeping it alive for-you and your comfort or the dog's comfort?'  I find that gets the thinking process going.  If there is little quality of life, you know the answer.

post #15 of 25

we are doing meat birds as well and this will be our first year trying to process them ourselves, the butcher cost 5.50 each bird and we want to do it our selves to save some money.  I agree keep the animals for the best life and then butcher the most humane way.  I eat meat and I am very sensitive and cry when our birds pass away you know layer hens.  but I refuse to raise our son that it is ok to get stuff if you do not do the dirty work, I think he needs to know that for us to have meat something gives its life.  and he needs to know how to pull weeds to get vegies and so on... I suck at weeding and the butchering proces but I am with you we will try it for the first time this year.  our son is not as sensitve to farm animals as I am so he is ok with it...

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MMPoultryFarms View Post


My broilers are for market Strictly, However I free range them because I don't agree with the industrys way of Drugging and hormoning So try to produce a more healthy and productive free range product. But.. As i said I never even looked at it like that. If I disagree with the way the industry treats and raises birds. Basically I would be doing the same thing Just without the walls. Seriously you Opened my eyes to something good. A Good happy chicken is a Good happy meal. thanks alot Dan again.



I know this is an old thread, but no producer in the United States is allowed to give hormones to chickens.  Antibiotics in the feed yes, but not hormones.  So any package of chicken you pick up from the store that says "no hormones!" is redundant.  Just FYI.

Housecall veterinarian from mid-Missouri

 

2 salmon Faverolles pullets, 4 Cornish crosses, 2 production red cockerels, 2 Belgian Malinois, 1 Belgian Malinois/Siberian husky (all working and performance dogs), 2 lynx point Siamese cats, 2 rats, 1 bearded dragon, 1 jungle carpet python

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Housecall veterinarian from mid-Missouri

 

2 salmon Faverolles pullets, 4 Cornish crosses, 2 production red cockerels, 2 Belgian Malinois, 1 Belgian Malinois/Siberian husky (all working and performance dogs), 2 lynx point Siamese cats, 2 rats, 1 bearded dragon, 1 jungle carpet python

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post #17 of 25

These chickens are raised in this manor because of demand.  I am sure the commercial growers would go back to a slower growing bird but consumers would stop buying chicken at the grocery store when the price of the bird over doubled. These birds were designed to be the way they are for a reason.  It costs less to raise them.  They are only in the world 6-8 weeks and the feed to weight gain is tremendous.  They cost less per pound.

 

There are a lot of people that would not think twice about paying much more for chicken.  I raise my own and I pay more than I could go to the grocery store and buy it.   Same with eggs.  But there are countless numbers of people that can hardly afford to feed themselves so cheap food is a necessity. 

 

I don't like the ways things are done but as long as there is demand for cheap food, nothing will be changed.  Companes that do cage free, organic, etc.... found a niche that they can make money on.  Some people are willing to pay more but the majority just want cheap food for their families.

 

Darin

 

Two boys, One wife,  1 cat named Johnny Cash and 1 cat named Pepper Sprout, Black Lab named Polly and a Yellwo Lab named Connor.  16 Cornish X at the moment.

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Two boys, One wife,  1 cat named Johnny Cash and 1 cat named Pepper Sprout, Black Lab named Polly and a Yellwo Lab named Connor.  16 Cornish X at the moment.

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post #18 of 25


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darin115 View Post

These chickens are raised in this manor because of demand.  I am sure the commercial growers would go back to a slower growing bird but consumers would stop buying chicken at the grocery store when the price of the bird over doubled. These birds were designed to be the way they are for a reason.  It costs less to raise them.  They are only in the world 6-8 weeks and the feed to weight gain is tremendous.  They cost less per pound.

 

There are a lot of people that would not think twice about paying much more for chicken.  I raise my own and I pay more than I could go to the grocery store and buy it.   Same with eggs.  But there are countless numbers of people that can hardly afford to feed themselves so cheap food is a necessity. 

 

I don't like the ways things are done but as long as there is demand for cheap food, nothing will be changed.  Companes that do cage free, organic, etc.... found a niche that they can make money on.  Some people are willing to pay more but the majority just want cheap food for their families.

 

Darin

 

Isnt that crazy? Its like people who buy cheap dog food and wonder why there dogs' hair is falling out. you would think that people would want the best food for there familys,not the cheapest. No wonder we all have digestion problems and a large majority of americans suffer with IBS! I keep saying "grow your own"
   

 

post #19 of 25

We got 2 Cornish Crosses from TSC when purchasing our flock and were shocked at how much bigger they are than my other chicks. However, they are now 5 weeks old and are as active as the rest of my flock. I only give them feed at night and during the day (9am-7pm) they are free range. So far we do not see any problems with their legs and when I walk outside they are the first ones to run across the yard to greet me. Granted, it is probably because I signify food in their eyes, but their personalities have stuck out among my other girls. So much so that I will miss them when we slaughter them in a couple of weeks. sad.png

 

I plan on getting about 4-5 more to raise as meat birds and treating the same way with feed only at night. Should I feed the next girls the same thing I am feeding my current ones to keep their growth from being too quick? Right now my Cornish X are on chick starter feed. Would the broiler feed speed their weight gain? I do not want them to lose mobility and quality of life before their time is up & am fine with them coming in smaller than a typical Cornish X.

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Working Dog Doc View Post



I know this is an old thread, but no producer in the United States is allowed to give hormones to chickens.  Antibiotics in the feed yes, but not hormones.  So any package of chicken you pick up from the store that says "no hormones!" is redundant.  Just FYI.



lol.. just because they aren't "allowed" to do something doesn't mean they follow the rules.. check this out :

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120405131431.htm

 

 

 

not hormones.. but still.. they found banned drugs in feather meal... nice huh?

 

I don't have poultry.. I have mini feathered velociraptors
Emu Hatch 2013-2014    Emu Hatch 2013   Emu Hatch 2012   Hatching Muscovy Eggs  Turkey Incubation and Hatching

Sexing Emu Chicks   Our Hoop Coop build   Blowing Out Emu Eggs for Crafting 

 

My Swap Page     

I ignore Trolls, so if I suddenly stop talking to you, it's not that you have won, you're just not worth the effort

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I don't have poultry.. I have mini feathered velociraptors
Emu Hatch 2013-2014    Emu Hatch 2013   Emu Hatch 2012   Hatching Muscovy Eggs  Turkey Incubation and Hatching

Sexing Emu Chicks   Our Hoop Coop build   Blowing Out Emu Eggs for Crafting 

 

My Swap Page     

I ignore Trolls, so if I suddenly stop talking to you, it's not that you have won, you're just not worth the effort

Reply
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