New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Blood in chicks' stools

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I have 17 mixed-breed chicks, ages 6-8 weeks, hatched during our county's fair.  I noticed blood in their stools & medicated them with Sulmet for coccidiosis (sp?) about 2 weeks ago.  About a week ago I noticed there was still blood in their stools, so medicated them with Wazine for worms.  This week there is still blood in their stools.

Otherwise, they are growing/eating/drinking/acting/pooping fine.  They are kept in an ark on grass, eating unmedicated Country Acres chick start & grow and whatever else they can get their beaks into.  I only notice the blood when I keep them in a cage on the patio during cool nights (we're in SE Fla) it's on the paper under the cage's wire bottom.

I wonder if I should worm them again?  If so, how soon?  Should I switch to medicated start & grow?  Leave well enough alone?  Please advise.

Thank you,
Carol in Florida

It's not happy people who are thankful, it is thankful people who are happy!
Reply
It's not happy people who are thankful, it is thankful people who are happy!
Reply
post #2 of 5

Because coccidia require moisture to become infective, the litter must be kept dry. Ventilation must be good and the birds should not be overcrowded.
Birds gradually become immune if they are exposed to a low level of infection, but clinical disease occurs if the coccidiosis challenge is too great.
(Immunity to one species of coccidia does not protect poultry against other coccidial species.
It is very risky to rely on hygiene alone to produce satisfactory control....it really is best to start your chicks on a medicated starter...extensive intestinal damage can occur which may irreparably damage the intestines to such an extent that malabsorption of nutrients may occur...(after medicating for clinical disease you should supplement with a general complete supplement like Avia Charge 2000 which can be purchased online from McMurry or Strombergs)...
As far as worming goes, my preference would be for ivomec Eprinex (see link below) which not only is braod spectrum (will treat most worms) but is also about the "safest" wormer too.
http://shilala.homestead.com/ivomec.html
(use the "spot=on" method)

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

These chicks have feathered out and are living in a tractor on grass all night & day now in our warm South Florida climate.  They have lots of fresh air & sunshine & green grass below their feet.  They are all acting very very well and healthy.  I just noticed the blood in their stool on the few nights I put them all in a cage on nights that were extra cool or stormy. 

Perhaps I should do that again in a few days, to see if there is still blood showing in anybody's stool.  Maybe they've thrown off whatever was causing that & no further treatment is needed.

Otherwise, what course of treatment should I persue?  I'd rather not use the heavy-duty wormer if I don't have to.  What are some more natural home remedies for worms?  DE?  Flax seed?  And after dosing with the Sulmet for coccidiosis must I feed medicated start & grow after that?

Thanks for your $.02

It's not happy people who are thankful, it is thankful people who are happy!
Reply
It's not happy people who are thankful, it is thankful people who are happy!
Reply
post #4 of 5

I just had two chicks who had coccidiosis and I ended up medicating for a lomg time-a couple weeks then I noticed blood again and medicated again for a couple weeks and they are finally doing better but it took a long time

~Kris~
Reply
~Kris~
Reply
post #5 of 5

There are no "natural" wormers that will treat an active infestion of worms... they are useful for control and management (so helping the bird keep a "balance" so it does not become overwhelmed)
If they have worms you will need a med to treat it.
DE is good for in the dust bath or around the coop/run to deal with insects that are carrier hosts to parasites that will turn into worms once eaten by your birds.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home