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Frizzle thread - Page 117

post #1161 of 1188
Quote:
Originally Posted by HannaDolly View Post



My rooster, I'm not really sure his exact breed but he is gorgeous 😍

Yes. Gorgeous he is.

post #1162 of 1188

The pictures below show the results of a frizzle/frizzle pairing.

 

 

Mom with chicks.

 

 

Dad.

 

 

Older frazzle sister with second batch; two little sisters-one smooth and one frizzle.

Below-two brothers and a sister-all frizzle.

 

 

All five are healthy and well feathered...and for sale.

 

I'd be happy to post other pictures if there is one you're interested in.

post #1163 of 1188
They look like little pine cones. So cute.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #1164 of 1188

Do frizzles have poor cold tolerance? I have a baby frizzle/easter egger cockerel and he is about 6 weeks. I have some other babies (not frizzles) who are a couple weeks older than him, and they are all still in my basement, because it's been too cold to put the little frizzle out, and I don't want to leave him inside by himself. This past weekend, I tried to put him outside for a few minutes during the day to forage and see how he would do, and within 5 minutes he was standing there and shivering. So clearly he is not ready to go out, but I am wondering how much longer I will need to keep him inside! They haven't had supplemental heat for maybe 2 weeks, and they are fine in a 60 degree basement, but going outside in freezing Ohio weather isn't quite the same thing. I have been waiting for a warmish spell to ease them outside, but it's been cold for the past week or two. Just curious if those curly feathers make for poorer insulation properties. My guess is yes, but I haven't seen anything that explicitly says so.

Thanks

post #1165 of 1188
Mine do fine here in Wisconsin without any extra heat. Your problem is your bird needs to be slowly acclimated to the outdoor temperatures which isn't easy this time of year. You may either need to keep it inside until outside temperatures are around 60 like in your basement. Otherwise you would need to provide extra heat and lower the temperature 5 degrees a week until they are the same as the outside temperature. You can't just move them out right now. That's why I only raise chicks in warmer weather.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #1166 of 1188

Thanks for the response. That makes a lot of sense, obviously we get slowly acclimated to temperatures as well.  I just wasn't sure if the feather type made a big difference as well. Since he is the youngest and smallest of this batch of chicks, I wasn't sure how much was that versus how much was the type of feathers. I'll probably wait for a little break in the cold and then move them outside with a heat lamp. They're starting to stink! LOL

post #1167 of 1188
Quote:
Originally Posted by amyopoka View Post
 

Do frizzles have poor cold tolerance? I have a baby frizzle/easter egger cockerel and he is about 6 weeks. I have some other babies (not frizzles) who are a couple weeks older than him, and they are all still in my basement, because it's been too cold to put the little frizzle out, and I don't want to leave him inside by himself. This past weekend, I tried to put him outside for a few minutes during the day to forage and see how he would do, and within 5 minutes he was standing there and shivering. So clearly he is not ready to go out, but I am wondering how much longer I will need to keep him inside! They haven't had supplemental heat for maybe 2 weeks, and they are fine in a 60 degree basement, but going outside in freezing Ohio weather isn't quite the same thing. I have been waiting for a warmish spell to ease them outside, but it's been cold for the past week or two. Just curious if those curly feathers make for poorer insulation properties. My guess is yes, but I haven't seen anything that explicitly says so. You are correct in thinking frizzle feathering provides poor insulation. Without supplemental heat it would be best to wait for spring...or...set up a heat lamp in your coop so the birds that need help have a warm place to go. This is what I do.

Thanks

post #1168 of 1188
Quote:
Originally Posted by amyopoka View Post
 

Do frizzles have poor cold tolerance? I have a baby frizzle/easter egger cockerel and he is about 6 weeks. I have some other babies (not frizzles) who are a couple weeks older than him, and they are all still in my basement, because it's been too cold to put the little frizzle out, and I don't want to leave him inside by himself. This past weekend, I tried to put him outside for a few minutes during the day to forage and see how he would do, and within 5 minutes he was standing there and shivering. So clearly he is not ready to go out, but I am wondering how much longer I will need to keep him inside! They haven't had supplemental heat for maybe 2 weeks, and they are fine in a 60 degree basement, but going outside in freezing Ohio weather isn't quite the same thing. I have been waiting for a warmish spell to ease them outside, but it's been cold for the past week or two. Just curious if those curly feathers make for poorer insulation properties. My guess is yes, but I haven't seen anything that explicitly says so.

Thanks

I have a little frizzle gal who pants most of the time when she is sitting on me or out in the sun.  She gets overheated really easily however she is a cochin/faverolle frizzle so that might be why she doesnt seem to have any problem with cold.

-Robin-
Let your life speak for you...it is said, "How you live your life speaks so loudly that others can't hear what you are saying anyway."
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-Robin-
Let your life speak for you...it is said, "How you live your life speaks so loudly that others can't hear what you are saying anyway."
Reply
post #1169 of 1188

Here's my baby frizzle, he's very pretty! Today was warm, around 50, so I let them outside and moved them into my garden shed we have that I can hook up some heat to. I'll turn the heat on tonight for them. We are supposed to have a couple of nice days, hopefully it will be enough for them to adjust before it gets cold again.

post #1170 of 1188
This is one my rooster and this is his son
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