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Bob Blosl's Heritage Large Fowl Thread - Page 915  

post #9141 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arielle View Post

 

NOw  I think I have learned something-- need the fluff for insulation, and then broad feathers rather than narrow feathers as the outer  " coat" to shed the rain; and becareful of the feathering on the legs. 

 

I'm all for functional. wink.png

You've got it right. There is no use for feathering to the ground in Orps in England except to win shows due to the judges being mesmerized by all that fluff, which does not fit their standard. It is MUDDY in much of England in the winter..certainly cold and wet. I kept Eddie Bauer and LL Bean in business for my years over there teaching riding and fox hunting. All that mud will just cling to trailing feathers and make for a cold bird.

 

A good base of fluff on top, covered with proper feathers will keep a chicken warm. They feather last on the underside for a reason. Not as much heat needed there. They DO need to keep their backs and organs warm, and wide feathers of substance will shed water while preserving body heat. The cute petticoats are for chicks to cuddle under, though they do keep the Orps' feet warm on the roost too.

 

It was pouring today here after 5 minutes of my Buff Orps being let out. Nobody took any notice until I called them in because I have the flu, and chills.The gang came in, shook, and were dry, including 35 babies. No bare backs here either, with 8 hens running with one very large cockerel.

50 years breeding and showing standard bred poultry . APA + ABA Life Member #7, and Master Exhibitor. SOP "Heritage" and Imported English Buff Orpington Large Fowl. The " Living Sunshine Girls."  NPIP TP # 56-450 AI clean.  No eggs, or day olds 

  

                    "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"    Some very nice birds to show late this fall. Contact me now.

50 years breeding and showing standard bred poultry . APA + ABA Life Member #7, and Master Exhibitor. SOP "Heritage" and Imported English Buff Orpington Large Fowl. The " Living Sunshine Girls."  NPIP TP # 56-450 AI clean.  No eggs, or day olds 

  

                    "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"    Some very nice birds to show late this fall. Contact me now.

post #9142 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by maryhysong View Post


Walt do you have any problems with aspergillous (spelling?) mold causing problems with your ducks, using straw when it's wet?


No.

post #9143 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3riverschick View Post

=========================================================================================================

I agree with call ducks. The Sussex is an English breed. It is soft-feathered but also close feathered ( Per the Standard, more so than the Orpington). Broomhead says the feathers should be close-feathered enough that they do not move out of position with every little puff of breeze that blows against them in the direction opposite the way the feathers lay.  Personally, I think soft-feather / close-feathered birds do better in the damp/cold than soft-feather / loose-feathered breeds. Would like to read the veteran breeders take on this question.

 Best,

 Karen

The key to making Orps , or any other breed weather proof is not only some insulation of under feathers and down, but the top feathers should be wide , with good substance. If the top feathering is narrow, and shredded looking , with no substance , it lets the rain and cold into the underfeathering, which soon becomes a wet mess. Needless to say that results in a cold , wet bird.

 

See the last few of the Post Pics of Orps Here thread for some Buff Orps who live out on the moors in England free ranging in all sorts of weather. These belong to a 17 year old boy , Johnn.

================================

 Hi Dragonlady,

 Thanks so much for your commets. Broomhead does say the Sussex feathers' should be tightly knitted.

He doesn't mention where on the body , tho, so I presume he means the whole body?) I looked but I can't find what that means. is it also related to the width and length of the feathers?

 Anyone out there that knows, thanks for enlightening!

 Merry Christmas,

 Karen


Edited by 3riverschick - 12/24/12 at 11:35pm

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

post #9144 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by call ducks View Post

Hey, 

 

Not sure i posted this image before. here's one of my breeder hens

 

 

A very happy rooster and not so happy hen...

 

 

 

 

Some young chicks

 

 

 

 

 

Another breeding hen

 

 

 

 

 

Just stunning, call ducks! Loving the lack of superhackle on that pretty boy. Comely pullets, too.

Nice depth of body and length of back. Stationed nicely over their legs.  Close-feathered too.

 Congrats!

Merry Christmas!

Karen


Edited by 3riverschick - 12/24/12 at 11:36pm

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

post #9145 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by call ducks View Post

The rooster has some black ticking in the sickle feathers. 

 

  Well, this gets seen when the bird is Colombian and either eb/eb or eb/eWh. I doubt that is the problem here. Looks like you have a color imbalance. Should be able to fix that by more closely matching the depth of color in the hackle and/or undercolor when you breed him. ( interestingly, the old lit says to breed the Light Sussex like the Light Brahma. That can only mean in the very general sense that they are both Columbian breeds. Because Light Brahma is eb locus and Light Sussex is eWh locus. So if one breeds Light Sussex  according to the Light Brahma, you may see the black stippling on the birds.

 

 Best,

 Karen

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

post #9146 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedragonlady View Post

Nobody took any notice until I called them in because I have the flu, and chills.

====================

 Oh no! And at Christmastime too. Well, keep warm and treat yourself to some hot chicken soup.

 Get well soon!

 Merry Christmas,

 Karen

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

Walt Boese Pure English strain Light Sussex

2014: Inaugurating what will become the Tewart flock of pure

English strain  Light Sussex sourced from North American stock.

( a   great nick between Boese and Ross strains They are looking

real good at  5 months on 11/6 )

"We are all just walking each other home." unknown

post #9147 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3riverschick View Post

  Well, this gets seen when the bird is Colombian and either eb/eb or eb/eWh. I doubt that is the problem here. Looks like you have a color imbalance. Should be able to fix that by more closely matching the depth of color in the hackle and/or undercolor when you breed him. ( interestingly, the old lit says to breed the Light Sussex like the Light Brahma. That can only mean in the very general sense that they are both Columbian breeds. Because Light Brahma is eb locus and Light Sussex is eWh locus. So if one breeds Light Sussex  according to the Light Brahma, you may see the black stippling on the birds.

 

 Best,

 Karen


Can you explain what you mean by this?

 

Thanks

 

Judi

You can call me Judi or Pozees.  Flock includes Speckled Sussex, RIR, Silkies, Bantam Cochins, Ameraucanas, several chicks and juveniles and eggs in the incubator.



NPIP # CO-120  Member APA, CPA, ASBC, Cochins International



"Tough times don't last; tough people do."  Gregory Peck

You can call me Judi or Pozees.  Flock includes Speckled Sussex, RIR, Silkies, Bantam Cochins, Ameraucanas, several chicks and juveniles and eggs in the incubator.



NPIP # CO-120  Member APA, CPA, ASBC, Cochins International



"Tough times don't last; tough people do."  Gregory Peck

post #9148 of 15800
Quote:

 

================================

 Hi Dragonlady,

 Thanks so much for your commets. Broomhead does say the Sussex feathers' should be tightly knitted.

He doesn't mention where on the body , tho, so I presume he means the whole body?) I looked but I can't find what that means. is it also related to the width and length of the feathers?

 Anyone out there that knows, thanks for enlightening!

 Merry Christmas,

 Karen

Are Light Sussex as tight feathered as some of the better Speckleds are that I have seen? I also wonder how this relates to Red Sussex for which I am not very familiar with?

 

Merry Xmas Everyone

post #9149 of 15800
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3riverschick View Post

The key to making Orps , or any other breed weather proof is not only some insulation of under feathers and down, but the top feathers should be wide , with good substance. If the top feathering is narrow, and shredded looking , with no substance , it lets the rain and cold into the underfeathering, which soon becomes a wet mess. Needless to say that results in a cold , wet bird.

 

See the last few of the Post Pics of Orps Here thread for some Buff Orps who live out on the moors in England free ranging in all sorts of weather. These belong to a 17 year old boy , Johnn.

================================

 Hi Dragonlady,

 Thanks so much for your commets. Broomhead does say the Sussex feathers' should be tightly knitted.

He doesn't mention where on the body , tho, so I presume he means the whole body?) I looked but I can't find what that means. is it also related to the width and length of the feathers?

 Anyone out there that knows, thanks for enlightening!

 Merry Christmas,

 Karen

Broad feathers, that have strong webs to hold them together (substance) and  that overlap, is what "tightly knitted" means. Those over lapping feathers act like the shingles on a roof, and shed rain. They also keep the wind out , therefore containing body warmth.

50 years breeding and showing standard bred poultry . APA + ABA Life Member #7, and Master Exhibitor. SOP "Heritage" and Imported English Buff Orpington Large Fowl. The " Living Sunshine Girls."  NPIP TP # 56-450 AI clean.  No eggs, or day olds 

  

                    "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"    Some very nice birds to show late this fall. Contact me now.

50 years breeding and showing standard bred poultry . APA + ABA Life Member #7, and Master Exhibitor. SOP "Heritage" and Imported English Buff Orpington Large Fowl. The " Living Sunshine Girls."  NPIP TP # 56-450 AI clean.  No eggs, or day olds 

  

                    "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"    Some very nice birds to show late this fall. Contact me now.

post #9150 of 15800

Lacy BLue-- Love the recept idea--will try that.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by call ducks View Post

Hey, 

 

Not sure i posted this image before. here's one of my breeder hens

 

 

Another breeding hen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THere is something elegant about this bird-- maybe it's the coloring, as I think the same thing when Kathy imo posts her dels!!

 

I had one LT sussex, and I was amazed that it grew VERY fast. Much faster than the BCmarans in the same hatch. SHe was an impressive pullet, one that I have never forgotten.

NPIP Tested Clean

 

             Bourbon Red and Sweetgrass Turkeys

 

             Black Copper Marans, Buff Orpingtons and Speckled Sussex    

  

 

Grow where you are planted. --Unknown

NPIP Tested Clean

 

             Bourbon Red and Sweetgrass Turkeys

 

             Black Copper Marans, Buff Orpingtons and Speckled Sussex    

  

 

Grow where you are planted. --Unknown

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