New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dominique??? - Page 2

post #11 of 35
Thread Starter 

lol, I think I may have been unclear...he was 4 weeks when we got him, he is about 16 weeks in the pic...give or take. I don't know the gal I got him from, but all the other chicks she was selling were black. She did not have the mom/dad with her so...I guess he will just be a mystery Roo!

post #12 of 35
Thread Starter 

Oh, and he is HUGE at 16 weeks. I have all bantams except for my one EE and my roox is bigger than a cochin but not standard size...whatever he is he will be one big bird!

post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by SC_Hugh 

Mutt or something else, Dominique only come in one flavor...Barred love

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/Dominique-chickens-heritage-poultry.aspx

"Whatever their exact origin, the smallish, barred Dominique type was well known before 1750. One hundred years later, one poultry writer would state that Dominique chickens were so familiar as to need no description".

--Hugh


The thing with the Dominique that they had back then looked nothing like the Dominique we have now..
Most of the Dominique's in the 1700 and 1800 were a Single comb, Crowing breed that came Blue Barred, Crele and about 2 or 3 other variations of color.
I believe they were also a Gamefowl much like today's American Game.

Here is a picture of a Dom/ Dominique Gamefowl the old Dominique would have looked close to this..
Not My Bird found on another site...
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/33115_1-20-08056.jpg


Chris

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply
post #14 of 35

For the OP's bird I would say it is a cross of a Dominique and a Silver laced Wyandotte. 

Chris

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris09 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SC_Hugh 

Mutt or something else, Dominique only come in one flavor...Barred love

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/Dominique-chickens-heritage-poultry.aspx

"Whatever their exact origin, the smallish, barred Dominique type was well known before 1750. One hundred years later, one poultry writer would state that Dominique chickens were so familiar as to need no description".

--Hugh


The thing with the Dominique that they had back then looked nothing like the Dominique we have now..
Most of the Dominique's in the 1700 and 1800 were a Single comb, Crowing breed that came Blue Barred, Crele and about 2 or 3 other variations of color.
I believe they were also a Gamefowl much like today's American Game.

Here is a picture of a Dom/ Dominique Gamefowl the old Dominique would have looked close to this..
Not My Bird found on another site...
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/33115_1-20-08056.jpg


Chris


I'd like to read a bit more about what you posted, could you offer some links/sources?

The Dominique club offers these:
One type of reference material that has eluded me for years were the early USDA reports. In the quest to complete my collection of Yearbooks of Agriculture, I have had the great fortune to locate the first, which was for the year 1862. To put this in perspective Isaac Newton was listed as Commissioner of Agriculture and the President was "His Excellency" Abraham Lincoln.

As part of his introduction to the chapter on poultry, D.S. Heffron of Utica, New York wrote: "In this article it is proposed to give a popular description of all the really good and distinct varieties of domestic fowls which are known in the United States." Many breeds were listed; Games, Asiatics, Spanish, Creepers, etc. however only one breed was recognized as unique to America, and his description is as follows:

"The Dominique is the best fowl of common stock that we have, and is the only common fowl in the country that has enough distinct characteristics to entitle it to a name. These fowls are full medium in size, being but little less in weight than the Dorking, have full breasts, roundish plumb bodies, double or single combs, and yellow legs. Their main plumage has a light gray ground color, while each feather is barred crosswise with a darker shade. They are frequently known by the name of "hawk-colored fowls." They are hardy, easily raised, retain their peculiarities with great tenacity, have yellow skins, a color preferred by many for a market fowl; and taking these fowls all in all, they are one of the best varieties for common use."


In the early Colonial days, according to tradition, the settlers formed this breed by a mixture of Dorking, Asiatic, and Hamburg blood.  Many strains of this great breed were scattered throughout the original thirteen colonies, as the eggs were carried from one settlement to another by the early fur traders and sailors....

     
      ...These birds had no type, and were marked like Josephs coat of many colors some were speckled black and white; others had red and white in their plumage, which could be expected of a fowl of mixed origin.  Some of these had five toes denoting Dorking ancestry, and others bore the Hamburg carriage and shape.  Most of the original females were wonderful layers, considering the conditions under which these fowls existed.  Their eggs were light brown.  They made good mothers, which was very essential in those days, as there were no modern incubators.

      When our standard makers handed out the decree that the plumage should be sharply barred, many breeders crossed the original bird with the Barred Rock.  This changed the form, eliminating the heavy tail plumage which was characteristic of the old original Dominique, but it did, however, improve the color.  After the cross was made, this breed began to lose its popularity.

http://www.dominiqueclub.org/

How go on the Bantams? I rely on you for their care, as I do on Anne for the Algerine fowls, and on our arrangements at Monticello for the East Indians. These varieties are pleasant for the table and furnish an agreeable diversification in our domestic occupations.---T. Jefferson
Reply
How go on the Bantams? I rely on you for their care, as I do on Anne for the Algerine fowls, and on our arrangements at Monticello for the East Indians. These varieties are pleasant for the table and furnish an agreeable diversification in our domestic occupations.---T. Jefferson
Reply
post #16 of 35

I will try to find what I have on them but here is a start.

In the American Standard of Perfection they refer to the Dominique that was used in the breeding the Barred Rock as a single comb Hawk-colored fowl commonly found locally and not the American Dominique/ Rose Comb Dominique we know today but it was.
Under the Dominique in the American Standard of Perfection it says that the Dominique (American Dominique) was probably a cross of the many Hawk-colored or Gray fowls kept in the New England States long before and poultry standard...

Here is a post on the Dominique Gamfowl that is on the The American Dominique web Page.
By Silver Gray
From Game Fowl News
November 1926
"It has been written that the Dominiques as we have them today were originated in this way"
http://www.dominiquechicken.com/Dominique_Games.html

It was also reviewing to how show results in a number of magazines from the 1800s there are Dominique Leghorns, Dominique Spanish, Dominique Italians and American Dominiques listed in a number of places. With the exception of the American Dominique, the word Dominique always precedes a breed inferring it is a variety.

Merriam Webster Dictionary lists Dominican as originating around 1534 and defines the word as a member of a mendicant order of friars founded by Saint Dominic in 1215 and dedicated especially to preaching. In medieval England, the Dominicans, dressed in a white tunic and scapular with a large black cloak and hood.

Chris


Edited by Chris09 - 9/24/10 at 12:55pm

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply
post #17 of 35
Thread Starter 

Thanks Chris! He does sort of have a tail like in the pic provided, has those greenish feathers that I love! As for the SLW reference...SWEET! Another bird type I wanted but ran out of room for, lol smile I love reading about the history of the birds too smile

post #18 of 35

I believe that your bird is a "Standard" Black And White Dominique crossed with a Silver Laced Wyandotte.
The bird I posted was in reference to the post to MTFarm Sorry about the mix up..

Chris

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply
post #19 of 35

Chris, great post. Thanks for the response!!  I'll do some more reading on that.

I've heard the friar reference before, that's interesting.

I'd like any more links/leads you have to more information on Dominiques.

I've only been here a little while but I've mentioned the Colonial Williamsburg rare breeds program a few times since it's one of the things that really got me interested in some of the older breeds. You might like taking a look at their site if you haven't already:
http://www.history.org/history/teaching/enewsletter/volume2/january04/techtips.cfm

How go on the Bantams? I rely on you for their care, as I do on Anne for the Algerine fowls, and on our arrangements at Monticello for the East Indians. These varieties are pleasant for the table and furnish an agreeable diversification in our domestic occupations.---T. Jefferson
Reply
How go on the Bantams? I rely on you for their care, as I do on Anne for the Algerine fowls, and on our arrangements at Monticello for the East Indians. These varieties are pleasant for the table and furnish an agreeable diversification in our domestic occupations.---T. Jefferson
Reply
post #20 of 35

It looks to me like he has a pea comb and he looks like his head looks like a Brahma, maybe a Light Brahma Cross.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: What Breed Or Gender is This?