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The Heritage Rhode Island Red Site - Page 716

post #7151 of 7457

The last pic is a R.C Hen I cross a R.C male over Kettles line wanting to get he R.C line in them to

post #7152 of 7457

We have found our Kittle females to be among the best layers.  However, the feathering isn't up to par with the better lines and the type isn't quite as showy.  I think it is hard to make general statements about birds from the Kittle lines because Mr Kittle tweaked his birds to his own liking many, many times over the years.  Afterall, he was breeding them for 75 years, so it really depends on when you got the birds and what "mix" you got at the time.  Is there value in some of those older lines?  Oh yes, I believe so, but for many folks they might be better off with different birds.  It just depends on what you're looking for.

 

It just all depends on what you want and what you want to do with the birds.   The Nelson line birds we got from immyjay54 have feathering quality that simply takes your breath away.  Just sayin'.  

 

 

Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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post #7153 of 7457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred's Hens View Post

 

Well, Sally, as you know as well as I, these Fogle based Reds are slow growers and since we actually like to eat larger birds, as we're pretty spoiled by these huge Rocks we raise.  We age them for a few days and they relax nicely.  We want a Red K to be 8 lbs live and a Rock K to be 9 lbs.  We like a big carcass.

 

Otherwise, you may as well take them at 6 pounds when they're really tender.

 




Hello Fred,

We also like are birds as large as we can get thm before slaughter. What method and how long do you age them?
post #7154 of 7457
Quote:
Originally Posted by qball53 View Post


Hello Fred,

We also like are birds as large as we can get thm before slaughter. What method and how long do you age them?

 

 

Just rest them in the frig for 3 days.  Or, another method is to bag them in a brine solution and rest them, in the bag, in the frig, for 3 days.  

 

 

Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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Practicing Sustainable Agriculture At The 45th Parallel

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post #7155 of 7457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred's Hens View Post

 

 

Just rest them in the frig for 3 days.  Or, another method is to bag them in a brine solution and rest them, in the bag, in the frig, for 3 days.  

 



THANK YOU
post #7156 of 7457

I am looking at how clean the carcasses are, how do you get all those feathers off do you singe them?

post #7157 of 7457
Quote:
Originally Posted by monnie662 View Post
 

I am looking at how clean the carcasses are, how do you get all those feathers off do you singe them?


Try skinning, there won't be any tiny feather hairs to stress over.

ISO a GQF 1502 cabinet incubator.  Wanting a new one on sale or a used one.
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ISO a GQF 1502 cabinet incubator.  Wanting a new one on sale or a used one.
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post #7158 of 7457
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyinIndiana View Post
 


Try skinning, there won't be any tiny feather hairs to stress over.


We don't stress over tiny hairs. Once cooked, you never notice them. Crispy skin is the best part :drool  I think a lot of Americans are a bit too picky, want everything sanitized and perfect before eating. Just like the cauliflower I grew this winter. The aphids found it and you could wash that cauliflower until you were blue in the face and never get them all out of those convoluted segments. I just sprinkle pepper over it after cooking, can't tell the aphids from the pepper, good to go :gig

See my profile for my website. All my birds are raised on organic feed. I raise many varieties of heritage turkeys and large fowl

chickens including Black and Blue Copper Marans, Rhode Island Red, Barred Rock, New Hampshire, Spangled Russian Orloffs, and red and black sex-links. Poults/chicks sold locally and shipped. Looking for a caretaker to help with the farm.

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See my profile for my website. All my birds are raised on organic feed. I raise many varieties of heritage turkeys and large fowl

chickens including Black and Blue Copper Marans, Rhode Island Red, Barred Rock, New Hampshire, Spangled Russian Orloffs, and red and black sex-links. Poults/chicks sold locally and shipped. Looking for a caretaker to help with the farm.

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post #7159 of 7457
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertmarcy View Post
 


We don't stress over tiny hairs. Once cooked, you never notice them. Crispy skin is the best part :drool  I think a lot of Americans are a bit too picky, want everything sanitized and perfect before eating. Just like the cauliflower I grew this winter. The aphids found it and you could wash that cauliflower until you were blue in the face and never get them all out of those convoluted segments. I just sprinkle pepper over it after cooking, can't tell the aphids from the pepper, good to go :gig

I sorta like skin on my chicken too, those pictures of the dressed birds looked so perfect that I couldn't help but ask.  As to everything sanitized I do try to be clean buttttttttt a little dirt don't  hurt anybody especially after a day in the barn or chicken yard.  I have eaten my share of it when the wind blows on this hill top it can look like a dust storm. But real optimistic about raising and eating my own birds, when I saw the pictures I said yep we need to do that.  These store bought birds are not always up to par. (and they have little hairs on them too):lau

post #7160 of 7457
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertmarcy View Post
 


We don't stress over tiny hairs. Once cooked, you never notice them. Crispy skin is the best part :drool  I think a lot of Americans are a bit too picky, want everything sanitized and perfect before eating. Just like the cauliflower I grew this winter. The aphids found it and you could wash that cauliflower until you were blue in the face and never get them all out of those convoluted segments. I just sprinkle pepper over it after cooking, can't tell the aphids from the pepper, good to go :gig

 

 

and the aphids increased the protein content considerably!

 

ETA: skinless chicken isn't worth cooking or eating


Edited by NYREDS - 3/15/14 at 6:29pm

APA General Licensed Judge with 50 years experience raising and showing all manner of fowl.

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APA General Licensed Judge with 50 years experience raising and showing all manner of fowl.

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