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wind eggs

post #1 of 3
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This morning when I let the girls out I noticed a wind egg on the floor of the tractor.  It had been broken open and the yolk partially eaten.  This is the third one I have found in two weeks.  I noticed the first one when I saw noname acting funny while she was out freeranging and she laid a windegg on the lawn.  The next morning I found one on the floor of the tractor but quickly pulled it out before the girls could get to it.  I am not sure why this is happening as all of the eggs I have been getting have very nice shells on them.  Does anyone know what causes this?  I am not sure if it is just her laying them or if it is one of the other girls.  They have 24/7 access to layer feed as well as yogurt twice a week, boss once a day and any veges/fruit I have extra of.  They freerange almost every day for an hour or more.  For those of you not familiar with the term, a wind egg is an egg with no shell and possibly no yolk as well.  It looks like a water balloon.  Any input would be helpful.

Mom of 3 girls, 1 calico cat, 7 spoiled silkies, a coop full of terrorists and the start of a Heritage RIR flock.  Love cheeps!!!
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Mom of 3 girls, 1 calico cat, 7 spoiled silkies, a coop full of terrorists and the start of a Heritage RIR flock.  Love cheeps!!!
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post #2 of 3

I've only ever had three fart eggs from my girls.  They were hard-shelled, very small, two had yolks, one didn't.   Just a glitch at the egg factory.  idunno

A soft shelled egg is a whole 'nother ball of wax.  Have you tried looking here for info?:

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/publications/1/egg-quality-handbook/16/thinshelled-eggs-and-shellless-eggs


Edited by gritsar - 10/19/10 at 9:53am

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, bredas and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

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If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, bredas and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

Reply
post #3 of 3

I've had a couple hard shelled tiny (less than 1.2 ounces) eggs in the past week.  Neither had yolks.  However, the previous day I'd had enormous 3.5 ounce eggs from every one of my hens.   I've also had a couple wind eggs (no shells) in the straw of the coop. Some were pecked open, others ignored. 

It may be their ages (my girls are 6 months old).  Or their breed (I have production type chickens from TSC).  But my belief is that since the wind eggs or too-small eggs are easier to lay, they kinda slide right out without much work.  Instead of taking the time to get into the nest box and do the work of laying an egg, these easy-to-lay eggs are more "oops!". 

Couple weeks ago one of my hens was acting strange in the evening, about 6:45pm or so.  She'd waddle, her fluff feathers almost brushing the ground. She'd stand perfectly still, almost asleep looking, then startle awake and move off, then squat a bit.  Reminded me of one of my kids when they were really trying to hold in a bowel movement and weren't sure they'd make it to the potty.    Next thing I knew, out slid a micro-thin shelled egg.  This hen also laid a perfectly normal hen the next morning.

I'm not sure how you can prevent any of these conditions, especially hens pecking at wind eggs laid outside the nest boxes. 
But I did notice in your list of feeds that you didn't include any oyster shell calcium.  Mine have it in a bowl beside their coop where they can freely access it.  Without it I may have more weird eggs than I already do.

Proud mom of 2 US Marines!   Happy care-giver to 11 ISA Brown hens, 2 Buff Orpingtons, and 1 Silver Laced Wyandotte; 1 elderly female Rottweiler who thinks she's a cat, 4 sons who are much taller than I am, the most awesome baby granddaughter alive, and a sweet computer geek husband who broods in front of his laptop and hatches incredible software.
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Proud mom of 2 US Marines!   Happy care-giver to 11 ISA Brown hens, 2 Buff Orpingtons, and 1 Silver Laced Wyandotte; 1 elderly female Rottweiler who thinks she's a cat, 4 sons who are much taller than I am, the most awesome baby granddaughter alive, and a sweet computer geek husband who broods in front of his laptop and hatches incredible software.
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