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Is the dust dangerous to breathe when cleaning coop? - Page 3

post #21 of 27

I use disposable drywall sanding masks when I clean the coop.  Just seeing the dirt/dust caked to the outside of the mask when I am done cleaning reminds me of what a good idea it is to wear one (because all of that dust would have ended up in my nose/mouth/lungs otherwise!).

post #22 of 27

When I clean out my Coop, once a year, I don't need to wear a mask cause it's a rich brown compost of deep litter with no dust, just a nice earthy smell.

Just a old coot with some backyard chickens and a garden.
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Just a old coot with some backyard chickens and a garden.
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post #23 of 27

Uh oh. I never thought about wearing a dust mask. Every day I lightly shovel out the poop and replace the shavings - not all over, just where needed, in spots. The times it has gotten dusty, like when it plops into the shavings on the floor, or when I'm shoveling it out the door, I have held my breath and walked outside the coop instinctively.

I had no idea the dust could cause lung infections, tho. Although I have to say it's been over a year and I've never felt any lung symptoms. Fortunately I'm not a compulsive cleaner. smile

Next time I'm at the store, it's dust masks for sure. Yikes!

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicksrcool 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinMyPeeps 

As a respiratory nurse I will say without fail that dust from a chicken coop is EXTREMELY dangerous to be inhaled. Then you combine the natural ammonia, etc, with things you may add like DE, sevin dust or PDZ and you only compound it! Yes a N-95 respirator is the key and you do need a good seal as was stated, otherwise, you're defeating the whole purpose. I watch my clients everyday and it reminds me to wear my mask in the coops hmm


Thank you, I'm convinced.  Do you think we will be OK with not having masks this whole time?  We've had them for about a year.


If any of you are not having any problems, I think you will be just fine. From this day forward, wear your masks!

BYC Member since 4/11/2002 Welsummers and Champagne d'Argents

                                     WCNA & ASCA Member

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BYC Member since 4/11/2002 Welsummers and Champagne d'Argents

                                     WCNA & ASCA Member

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post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinMyPeeps 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicksrcool 
Quote:


O.M.G. LOVE!love


I know right? Who says our chicken hobby can't be stylish thumbsup


so true! big_smile

Chicken Mama to 2 RIR's named "Lipstick" & "Puffin" and 1 GLW named "Mystery"
(born in July 2009) Have you hugged your chickens today?
New additions November 11, 2009 Ameraucanas: "Peanut", "Blondie", and "Spunky".
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Chicken Mama to 2 RIR's named "Lipstick" & "Puffin" and 1 GLW named "Mystery"
(born in July 2009) Have you hugged your chickens today?
New additions November 11, 2009 Ameraucanas: "Peanut", "Blondie", and "Spunky".
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post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkmatter 

When I clean out my Coop, once a year, I don't need to wear a mask cause it's a rich brown compost of deep litter with no dust, just a nice earthy smell.


What do you use for litter? Picking up a flapping chicken causes billowing dust clouds in mine.

~ Randall
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~ Randall
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post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by racuda 
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkmatter 

When I clean out my Coop, once a year, I don't need to wear a mask cause it's a rich brown compost of deep litter with no dust, just a nice earthy smell.


What do you use for litter? Picking up a flapping chicken causes billowing dust clouds in mine.


For litter, I use the lawnmower clippings, pine cones, pine needles, leaves (in the fall), and whatever else I rake up from under my trees etc to throw into the DLM. My DLM is on a sub-ground level dirt floor contained within the brick foundation I built. (See my BYC page) It gets turned over by the chickens on a daily basis and if it looks like it's starting to mat down, I will toss some scratch in to encourage the chickens, or if all else fails turn it over with a spading fork----you can see the fork in the background on my BYC page pics. The litter composts down into a rich brown earthy smelling material----it is not dry and dusty or wet and sour, it is just moist enough to keep the compost active. I believe it's due to being in contact with the earth allowing micro-organisms and ground moisture to make compost. Most people think they are using the DLM method by having a thick layer of absorbent, that is not composting, that is just a thick layer of adsorbed poo! that dries out or gets wet and produces that ammonia smell.

Just a old coot with some backyard chickens and a garden.
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Just a old coot with some backyard chickens and a garden.
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