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Jumbo Ringneck Pheasant Questions

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

What differences are there between the Jumbo Ringneck and standard Ringnecks besides size and temperment? I'm getting into Jumbos specifically for the better temperment and larger size, but I can't find any information on the male to female ratio, how many eggs they lay per year, or the amount of space that they need (more because they are larger, less because they aren't as highstrung?).

Any help is appreciated.

Raising American Buff and Pilgrim Geese, Ancona, Harlequin, Rouen, Campbell, Saxony, and Buff ducks, Muscovies, Rosecomb Barred Rock, Blue Laced Red Wyandotte, Wheaten/Blue Ameraucana, and Red Ameraucana chickens, Blue/Royal Palm and Blue Slate turkeys, Jumbo Coturnix quail, Jumbo Ringneck Pheasants, Redclaw Lobsters, Blue Tilapia, and an assortment of show rabbits. Hatching eggs available.
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Raising American Buff and Pilgrim Geese, Ancona, Harlequin, Rouen, Campbell, Saxony, and Buff ducks, Muscovies, Rosecomb Barred Rock, Blue Laced Red Wyandotte, Wheaten/Blue Ameraucana, and Red Ameraucana chickens, Blue/Royal Palm and Blue Slate turkeys, Jumbo Coturnix quail, Jumbo Ringneck Pheasants, Redclaw Lobsters, Blue Tilapia, and an assortment of show rabbits. Hatching eggs available.
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post #2 of 11

You have pretty much nailed it already. The jumbo is larger and has a better temperament. They aren't nearly as flighty as the standard ring-neck. In fact, mine will eat from my hand. The jumbo hens I have lay much more eggs than the standard hen, at least mine did.  During the mating season, that tame jumbo will  become a viscous monster. They will literally chase a hen down just to mate with her and chase them repeatedly. If you have 2 males expect one to die and keep them away from any other pheasant as well during mating season.

I would have NO less than 6 hens per male or he will terrorize your hens especially if they are in a small space. Some people will suggest 10:1 ratio for the ring-neck & that might be spot on. The section I have for mine is 16'W X 40'L and I only have 4 birds now. I let them roam together for now with no problems but I will have to separate the males soon. With a healthy diet one of my hens laid 60 eggs one year, so if you have 10 hens during the mating season you may get 600 eggs or so.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Drats.

Thank you for the information. The individual from whom I purchased these birds said he would not keep them in any less than trios due to fertility. That didn't quite sound right since standards were recommended at a 1:8-1:10 ratio. He did warn me that the males would have to be kept separated or said I should clip the wing of the alpha male and provide high perches that the omega can't get to - that way he could escape harrassment. He also suggested that so that the hens would have a place to flee to in case the males were a little too romantic.

I'll see what I can do to get more hens. I can probably work out enough to get six hens total (and then I may have one or two males to sell on here smile.  From there it will just be a matter of making sure I have enough space for them, since I was initially going to do two trios in two separate pens for more genetic diversity.

The number of eggs laid helps immensely, too. I was told it would be around 100 "or so." I'll scale back my expectations to 60ish.

Raising American Buff and Pilgrim Geese, Ancona, Harlequin, Rouen, Campbell, Saxony, and Buff ducks, Muscovies, Rosecomb Barred Rock, Blue Laced Red Wyandotte, Wheaten/Blue Ameraucana, and Red Ameraucana chickens, Blue/Royal Palm and Blue Slate turkeys, Jumbo Coturnix quail, Jumbo Ringneck Pheasants, Redclaw Lobsters, Blue Tilapia, and an assortment of show rabbits. Hatching eggs available.
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Raising American Buff and Pilgrim Geese, Ancona, Harlequin, Rouen, Campbell, Saxony, and Buff ducks, Muscovies, Rosecomb Barred Rock, Blue Laced Red Wyandotte, Wheaten/Blue Ameraucana, and Red Ameraucana chickens, Blue/Royal Palm and Blue Slate turkeys, Jumbo Coturnix quail, Jumbo Ringneck Pheasants, Redclaw Lobsters, Blue Tilapia, and an assortment of show rabbits. Hatching eggs available.
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post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by oleduke 

You have pretty much nailed it already. The jumbo is larger and has a better temperament. They aren't nearly as flighty as the standard ring-neck. In fact, mine will eat from my hand. The jumbo hens I have lay much more eggs than the standard hen, at least mine did.  During the mating season, that tame jumbo will  become a viscous monster. They will literally chase a hen down just to mate with her and chase them repeatedly. If you have 2 males expect one to die and keep them away from any other pheasant as well during mating season.

I would have NO less than 6 hens per male or he will terrorize your hens especially if they are in a small space. Some people will suggest 10:1 ratio for the ring-neck & that might be spot on. The section I have for mine is 16'W X 40'L and I only have 4 birds now. I let them roam together for now with no problems but I will have to separate the males soon. With a healthy diet one of my hens laid 60 eggs one year, so if you have 10 hens during the mating season you may get 600 eggs or so.


Would that be more of a "monster" than a standard sized ringneck cock during breeding season? I have been thinking of going jumbo myself next year.

Steve

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_of_sandspoultry 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oleduke 

...  During the mating season, that tame jumbo will  become a viscous monster. They will literally chase a hen down just to mate with her and chase them repeatedly...


Would that be more of a "monster" than a standard sized ringneck cock during breeding season? I have been thinking of going jumbo myself next year.

Steve


They really aren't any more aggressive than the standard ring-neck, but the jumbo has (at least mine do) 2 or 3 pounds more weight on him. That extra weight is a lot harder on the hens. I feel bad for the hens as they actually squeak, squawk, or cry (however best describes it) while the larger jumbo is on their back. Even with 6 hens per male, I often have 1 or 2 hens that he will single out and is relentless towards those 1 or 2. The hens back will be bare about 3 weeks into the mating season; which is why I separate them. With only 2 hens now, I have already partitioned a safe haven for my girls in anticipation of this.

The jumbos weight literally forces the hen on the ground & I fear he will break a hens leg given the football style tackle in which he mounts them. My standard ring-neck was just as aggressive but not as large. I don't like the jumbos temperament during the mating season and I often remove the hens from the male altogether because of this. That's about the only bad thing I can say about them. They really are a joy to have with this one exception based on my own experience with jumbos & standard birds. There are probably some good folks here that have equally bad tales about their male pheasants in the mating season as well.

Hope that helps...

Dave & oleduke ( he is my dog lol )

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by oleduke 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_of_sandspoultry 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oleduke 

...  During the mating season, that tame jumbo will  become a viscous monster. They will literally chase a hen down just to mate with her and chase them repeatedly...


Would that be more of a "monster" than a standard sized ringneck cock during breeding season? I have been thinking of going jumbo myself next year.

Steve


They really aren't any more aggressive than the standard ring-neck, but the jumbo has (at least mine do) 2 or 3 pounds more weight on him. That extra weight is a lot harder on the hens. I feel bad for the hens as they actually squeak, squawk, or cry (however best describes it) while the larger jumbo is on their back. Even with 6 hens per male, I often have 1 or 2 hens that he will single out and is relentless towards those 1 or 2. The hens back will be bare about 3 weeks into the mating season; which is why I separate them. With only 2 hens now, I have already partitioned a safe haven for my girls in anticipation of this.

The jumbos weight literally forces the hen on the ground & I fear he will break a hens leg given the football style tackle in which he mounts them. My standard ring-neck was just as aggressive but not as large. I don't like the jumbos temperament during the mating season and I often remove the hens from the male altogether because of this. That's about the only bad thing I can say about them. They really are a joy to have with this one exception based on my own experience with jumbos & standard birds. There are probably some good folks here that have equally bad tales about their male pheasants in the mating season as well.

Hope that helps...

Dave & oleduke ( he is my dog lol )


Thanks Dave, that's a big help

Steve

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Definitely a huge help.

Does anyone happen to know how long pheasant hens are fertile after being in with the male? Could I keep the male in with the hens for a week, then take him out for a week to give them a rest before repeating the cycle without any problem with the fertility rate?

That seems like it would be an easy way to give the girls a little break while still collecting viable eggs. Provided you only have a few males and not a hundred that need to be moved.

I'm already assuming that any males removed would need to be kept in their own separate pens, if not just isolated in a cage (or sectioned off area) individually and not just thrown together.

Raising American Buff and Pilgrim Geese, Ancona, Harlequin, Rouen, Campbell, Saxony, and Buff ducks, Muscovies, Rosecomb Barred Rock, Blue Laced Red Wyandotte, Wheaten/Blue Ameraucana, and Red Ameraucana chickens, Blue/Royal Palm and Blue Slate turkeys, Jumbo Coturnix quail, Jumbo Ringneck Pheasants, Redclaw Lobsters, Blue Tilapia, and an assortment of show rabbits. Hatching eggs available.
Reply
Raising American Buff and Pilgrim Geese, Ancona, Harlequin, Rouen, Campbell, Saxony, and Buff ducks, Muscovies, Rosecomb Barred Rock, Blue Laced Red Wyandotte, Wheaten/Blue Ameraucana, and Red Ameraucana chickens, Blue/Royal Palm and Blue Slate turkeys, Jumbo Coturnix quail, Jumbo Ringneck Pheasants, Redclaw Lobsters, Blue Tilapia, and an assortment of show rabbits. Hatching eggs available.
Reply
post #8 of 11

We are planning on getting some jumbo's next spring and raising them side by side with the standard size. We have the pen space to seperate them so it should be interesting.

Steve

post #9 of 11
Would Jumbo Cortunix Quail co-exist with the Jumbo Ringnecks in the same enclosure?
post #10 of 11

No You can't keep taking males out and putting them back in because then you would have territory issues and you would probably end up with alot of deceased birds.

Also once you take out any males from females no eggs would be viable.

If your worried about the females give them a high perch because with the males being heavier it is harder for them to fly up on perches or you could clip the males wings and the females would be safe up high but then they may not want to come down from there either.

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