New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

chicken fat

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

So I just separated out a large package of chicken from the store.  I now have a small pile of chicken fat and chicken scraps.  How can I prepare this to feed my birds?  I was just going to pan fry it and soak up the grease with break chunks.  Can I give it to them raw?  I figure my birds could use the calories during the winter and I have no ethical issues with feeding my chickens chicken.
scott

post #2 of 15

Here's what you do to make the elixer of the Gods.   This is stuff that you will dream about once you've had it.
My Grandma also used to use the chicken fat that she trimmed from her chickens as the shortening in biscuits, and some of it as a base for chicken gravy.   Can you imagine how rich and good those biscuits and gravy tasted?



http://www.sadiesalome.com/recipes/schmaltz.html

http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/egg/egg1296/schmaltz.html#axzz18CvP1fPo

Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul.
And sings the tune Without the words,
and never stops at all.
Emily Dickinson
Reply
Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul.
And sings the tune Without the words,
and never stops at all.
Emily Dickinson
Reply
post #3 of 15

I wouldn't feed raw.  Cooked, no problem.

post #4 of 15

Just shop it up small and give it to them.  They don't need it cooked.  Raw won't hurt them.

gg

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

dang it!!!  one vote for raw, one vote for cooked, and one vote for eat it yourself.  I need a deciding vote here folks (and eat it yourself is not on the ballot).
scott


Edited by sashurlow - 12/16/10 at 7:06am
post #6 of 15

To be on the safe side I would cook it - I studied microbiology.

I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
I own a Rock Group; 2 Barred Rocks and 2 Buff Rocks (now sadly only 1 Buff Rock, my sweet Angelika died on Memorial day) .
Reply
post #7 of 15

Cook it, so they do turn into canibals (sp?).

Boxer, Sadie, my beautiful granddogger, Shephard/Husky, Pauz, granddog, and 4 RIRs, Frenchi, Henrietta, Souffle and Noodles (DOB 6/14/2010).  Oh and one DS.

Reply

Boxer, Sadie, my beautiful granddogger, Shephard/Husky, Pauz, granddog, and 4 RIRs, Frenchi, Henrietta, Souffle and Noodles (DOB 6/14/2010).  Oh and one DS.

Reply
post #8 of 15

No need to cook it..................... here we go again thinking the chickens eat like we do, cooking it is Ok also but in no way is it ever ever nessesary to do so.

                                                                                                AL


Edited by al6517 - 12/16/10 at 7:22am
Standard White Cornish, Dark's & White laced Red Cornish Breeder..........If you don't have Cornish you don't have Chickens. Breeding the best, to the best.
As good as a few and better than most, What You'll Tolerate in your flock is what you'll get.
Reply
Standard White Cornish, Dark's & White laced Red Cornish Breeder..........If you don't have Cornish you don't have Chickens. Breeding the best, to the best.
As good as a few and better than most, What You'll Tolerate in your flock is what you'll get.
Reply
post #9 of 15

If this was chicken from your backyard or mine- I would have voted raw.  Coming from a grocery store- well, you've seen the pictures of those farms.  Cooking it will kill anything lurking on it....

post #10 of 15

I would cook it, mostly so *I* don't have to handle it raw. 

I give mine the skin and other bits after I do crock pot 'roast' (boiled?) chicken -- chop it up fine and mix in raisins or sunflower seeds, and it's like suet.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Feeding & Watering Your Flock