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PROBIOTICS for you and your chickens - Page 2

post #11 of 1039

Does it taste good? idunno

Ducks rule, but so do chickens. Proud owner of one female pekin named Sunny.
3 RIR/PRs and 2 EEs. 5 hens 28+ weeks old and almost full size! Please visit my dragons
http://dragcave.net/user/Pet_Duck_Boy114
I'm the Cocky Cockeral of BYC!
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Ducks rule, but so do chickens. Proud owner of one female pekin named Sunny.
3 RIR/PRs and 2 EEs. 5 hens 28+ weeks old and almost full size! Please visit my dragons
http://dragcave.net/user/Pet_Duck_Boy114
I'm the Cocky Cockeral of BYC!
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post #12 of 1039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pet Duck Boy 

Does it taste good? idunno


Consumed plain, it has a sour taste to it (depending on how old it is and how much butterfat was in the milk) but you can always add flavor to it. Adding things like honey, stevia, agave, fruit, whatever, always helps. smile

Personally I find Kefir grown from some VERY rich milk is good old plain. The sour taste isn't there as much, and the texture is very creamy, thick, smooth, and almost "carbonated."

Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

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Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

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post #13 of 1039
Quote:
Originally Posted by joebryant 
Quote:
Originally Posted by emarble 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joebryant 

WHAT ARE PROBIOTICS?
      http://www.jonbarron.org/detoxing-health-program/05-01-1999.php?gclid=COz41uzZ-KUCFQTNKgodFQoIpA

*******************
KEFIR   http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/Makekefir.html
                      Watch all ten of this guy's presentations:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MELveoRjK8M

BUTTERMILK Mine love it, and its lactic acid and bacteria culture is super healthy for them and YOU.
I make it a gallon at a time:
Buy a quart of buttermilk, pour it into a large container with a gallon of milk.  Let the five quarts sit at room temperature for 24 hours, stirring occasionally, and you'll have five quarts.  Save a quart to use with another gallon of milk later.
BTW, buttermilk will keep for a very long time in the refrigerator.
Store in a glass container(s).

YOGURT  MAKE INEXPENSIVE YOGURT THE EASY WAY
(based on directions from Miss Prissy on the Backyard Chickens forum)
by
Joe D. Bryant
You will need:
A small plastic, insulated cooler that will hold:
4 one-quart jars/lids for yogurt/milk OR 2 half-gallon jars/lids for yogurt milk
2 more quart jars to be filled with boiling water
A very large pan to first boil water and then heat milk to 185* F.

Ingredients:
One gallon of milk (1%  to 4%)
One cup (or two heaping tablespoonsful per quart if not making a whole gallon) of PLAIN yogurt with live culture no flavor no fruit   Stonyfield Farms Organic plain yogurt OR Traders Point Creamery plain yogurt are both excellent and are sold by Marsh and other large chain stores for $5 quart.

I used an Igloo 26-quart cooler that K-Mart sells for about $20.

After the large pan of water is boiling, dip all the jars/lids in for several seconds to sterilize everything.

Pour the large pan of boiling water into the cooler and into two quart jars.  Put the lids on the jars loosely. Close the coolers lid with the two jars filled and the rest of the boiling water in the bottom of the cooler.

Set the cooler aside to heat up and proceed to make the yogurt:

After cooling the large pan, use it again to heat one gallon of milk to 185 degrees (I used Anne's meat thermometer because I couldn't find a "candy" thermometer in two stores).  Place the hot milk  pan in a sink filled with ice water and let it cool to 115 degrees (took about five minutes with ice on outside of pan).  Stir in one cup of plain yogurt into the 115* F milk.  After mixing well, pour the milk into the four sterilized one-quart glass  jars or two half-gallon jars and put on the lids (not tight).

Go back to the cooler, set the two quarts of hot water aside for a moment and empty the hot water out of the bottom of the cooler.  Set the jars of warm milk/yogurt mix into the cooler with the two jars of boiling water and close the lid.
After ten to twelve hours, take out the bottles of milk (finished yogurt) and put them in the refrigerator to cool.

Thats it:
For the cost of a gallon of milk, you have four quarts of yogurt that are identical to the cup of expensive plain yogurt that you bought.  Save a cup of your new yogurt to make another gallon when this one is gone. 

KOMBUCHA  Making Kombucha (one gallon)

You will need:
One scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast)
One cup of starter (already made kombucha)
One gallon of boiling water
Seven Black tea teabags
Two cups of sugar

Bring one gallon of water to a boil and then turn it off.
Add two cups of  sugar and seven black tea teabags to the very hot water.
Let the hot water with sugar and tea bags sit until the water cools.
Remove the tea bags from the cooled water.

Have the scoby and a cup of starter in the bottom of a very-wide-mouth glass container. The opening of the container should be wider than the depth of the liquid in it.  The process needs the surface area for air/breathing.
Pour the cooled water into the glass container with the scoby and one cup of starter.
Cover the glass container with a cloth, not a glass lid; the mixture has to breathe. 


After seven days remove the new (baby) scoby from the top of the old one (mother).  Last weeks scoby (the mother) can be give to somebody else as a starter or thrown away.  Note: If a new scoby (baby) looks underdeveloped, keep old (mother) and new (baby) together for another week before you separate them.
Strain your fresh kombucha into a glass container(s) and refrigerate. Use one cup of the fresh kombucha (starter) and the baby scoby (to be a new mother)  to make a new batch for next week.


"KEFIR" is actually quicker and easier than the others and if you get good grains they will multiply even quicker than the you tube guys videos I got mine from here and they have already almost doubled and are producing a full quart a day   http://www.kefirlady.com/orderkefirgrains.htm



Easy
to make you need fresh whole milk and kefir grains  1/4 cup of kefir grains and 1 quart of whole milk let it set on the counter overnight covered with a cloth/ stir after 24 hours and strain

ernie


Ernie, I agree.  Kefir is best by far.  Not only does it have 52 probiotics (Yogurt has two.) in the forms of good bacterias and yeasts, it's the easiest to work with.  I use two two-gallon glass jars with glass tops from Walmart.  I add a quart or two of milk per day, so I only have to strain it once a week into the other two-gallon jar that goes into the refrigerator; then I wash the first one, dump the grains from the plastic colander back into it, add a quart of milk that's just barely warmed in the microwave, cover with a paper sack, and add a quart a day for seven more days.  So that's more than a gallon a week for my wife, my chickens, my dogs, and me. I could make a gallon a day now if I wanted to, but...  http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/9574_glass_jar.jpg
I've only had mine for a few weeks, and they've multiplied quite a bit.  There are some members whom I'll be sending some free grains when I get back from Florida.

ETA  Anne and I can already see a BIG difference in our digestion systems, sleep, and energy.  The stuff is really something.  EVERYONE should be drinking it.  It's like yogurt on steroids.


Joe
Yes that is what I use to make my Kombucha but never thought about using it to make kefir the way you do. Although it does sound easier and I may try it, I am using my grains and making it a quart at a time and a day at a time and ageing it in the refrigerator in a gallon Jug! The longer it sits the mellower it get and gets better and better! My grains That I got were about 1/4 cup now after a week I have almost 1 full cup of grains and am getting ready to share some with My BYC friends here in Missouri

I will also say you are right on the Yougurt on steroids (This stuff is the greatest thing I have ever seen and the taste just keeps getting better and better!

Kombucha for the first batch was wonderful and the taste was kinda that of an aged cider with a fizz and it definitely has an effect!!

Chickens love the Kefir and now will go right tothe bowl and gobble it up no questions ask (Cats inside not so sure that they like it but the little long haired dauchand that is my wifes loves it!!

BEST THING I EVER FOUND! I will keep drinking it

Ernie

He who is seeking his own happiness and who punishes those who also long for happiness is running after a chimera. No happiness shall come his way for having destroyed that of others
"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
"You must be the change you wish to see in the world." ~ M.K. Gandhi
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He who is seeking his own happiness and who punishes those who also long for happiness is running after a chimera. No happiness shall come his way for having destroyed that of others
"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
"You must be the change you wish to see in the world." ~ M.K. Gandhi
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post #14 of 1039

I think making kefir is going on my after Christmas to do list.  I buy it every now and then but it is so expensive.  Thank you for sharing how you make it.  Both my family and my chickens will be happy!

post #15 of 1039

I make water keffir ( can't have dairy or gluten) and it is incredibly good for you and tastes great. The grains multiply quickly and my chickens love them. I also eat a few crumbles of these awesome probiotics.. My kids love it too because it's the closest thing to pop ( or cola/soda/etc) we have around here.

Chicken lovin' mama to 2 wonderful children, and too many to count feathered ones. Wife to a man who can appreciate me in all my crazy.
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Chicken lovin' mama to 2 wonderful children, and too many to count feathered ones. Wife to a man who can appreciate me in all my crazy.
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post #16 of 1039

bout to try making the yogurt droolin ... AND bought some kefir while I was at TJ's tonight just cause you all got me curious enough to try it!  I figure if I don't like it the girls will get it.

ETA sad discovered when i was cooling my milk that the double boiler did not fit well into the pan i had icewater in.  As I was trying to correct the situation I lost hold of the double boiler and took on water hit ... at least I was only doing a quart, maybe I'll try again tomorrow.


Edited by Truevalentine - 12/23/10 at 9:44pm
Miss Valentine's Playschool in Suisun City, CA has openings for children 0 months to school age!  If you know anyone looking for childcare in my area please let me know.
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Miss Valentine's Playschool in Suisun City, CA has openings for children 0 months to school age!  If you know anyone looking for childcare in my area please let me know.
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post #17 of 1039

I would love to brew kombuchu again.  It has a wonderful flavor.
I get kefir from my dtr who does milking for a neighbor.  I like to whirl frozen fruit in the blender  then buzz in briefly some kefir or yogurt.  That is our go to drink for my grandkids who have never had soda at this grandmas house.   Blueberry is our particular favorite and I also like just a few frozen elderberries for the antioxidant effects and it makes a really cool pink smoothie too.

Living the good life with husband of 33 years, three grown, married children, 4 grandchildren.  And about 550 hostas.
Raising heritage  LF RC RIR's,  a couple of Marans and a few olive and easter eggers for a pretty egg basket.

Member of the APA and Rhode Island Red Club of  America.
See why worming is so important:
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=7474233

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Living the good life with husband of 33 years, three grown, married children, 4 grandchildren.  And about 550 hostas.
Raising heritage  LF RC RIR's,  a couple of Marans and a few olive and easter eggers for a pretty egg basket.

Member of the APA and Rhode Island Red Club of  America.
See why worming is so important:
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=7474233

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post #18 of 1039

Yup, definitely going to make this. I have always loved kefir and the thought that I can make it for cheaper than buying it, really seems attractive. But, I am also going to make some yogurt since my kids love the yogurt with local honey and nuts for breakfast.

I can also throw my sprouts on this too! Now if only I had just a bit more time to devote to all this home cooked and home made food, I would be extremely happy!

My friends already complain to me that they don't have enough time for all the advice I give them about doing their weight-bearing exercise, keeping flexibility, getting their cardio exercise, raise chickens, grow sprouts....and now MAKE KEFIR! Thank goodness my "friends" here will listen. wink

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
-- Dalai Lama
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Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
-- Dalai Lama
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post #19 of 1039
Quote:
Originally Posted by firsthouse_mp 

Yup, definitely going to make this. I have always loved kefir and the thought that I can make it for cheaper than buying it, really seems attractive. But, I am also going to make some yogurt since my kids love the yogurt with local honey and nuts for breakfast.

I can also throw my sprouts on this too! Now if only I had just a bit more time to devote to all this home cooked and home made food, I would be extremely happy!

My friends already complain to me that they don't have enough time for all the advice I give them about doing their weight-bearing exercise, keeping flexibility, getting their cardio exercise, raise chickens, grow sprouts....and now MAKE KEFIR! Thank goodness my "friends" here will listen. wink


The Kefir and Kombucha and Kombucha are so quick and easy to use and only take about 15 min a day! The kombucha takes about 20 minutes to make the tea and put together and then you don't mess with it for a week till it is done! I am with Joe on the fact that I will never make Yougurt again! Kefir is so much better and is better for you with the 52 probiotics and yeast cultures it has and it is SO CHEAP TO make too! I have to buy my milk but it is $3 a gallon at the local dairy (Fresh from the cow is the best (I do wish I could find someone that has goats around here that I could buy goat milk from and use it to make my Kefir (Guess I am going to have to add Goats to my list along with my chickens LOL)! Kombucha to make only takes Probabely under a dollar a gallon to make (One gallon of Spring water and 8 tea bags 1 1/2 cups of sugar and put in a $7 walmart jar and you have a gallon of Kombucha in a week Taste better than any soft drink youve ever had) I am going to start experimenting with different teas though like Red Tea! Joe I think is using black tea and I am using Green tea BUT I think that is just taste preference) I am going to try red tea next and see what happens! You will have an endless supply of mushrooms to use after a while but I hear chickens like them too!

He who is seeking his own happiness and who punishes those who also long for happiness is running after a chimera. No happiness shall come his way for having destroyed that of others
"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
"You must be the change you wish to see in the world." ~ M.K. Gandhi
Reply
He who is seeking his own happiness and who punishes those who also long for happiness is running after a chimera. No happiness shall come his way for having destroyed that of others
"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
"You must be the change you wish to see in the world." ~ M.K. Gandhi
Reply
post #20 of 1039

I tried to make Kombucha a while back. I bought the culture and followed directions.... for the initial batch it needs about 28 days and you will know it's done because it forms a new culture... well mine never did so I let it sit a few more days and then it was moldy.
I think the culture cost me about $12.

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