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Specific temperature for brooding chicks?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

What temp do i need it to be??  I have them in a large plactic storage box with pine shavings down and the brooder lamp about 2 ft.  above them.  Do i need to check the temperature of do they just need the brooder light on them?

Here chick chick chick!  Moved from a large city to a small town.  There is nothing like seeing the stars in the country.  My family is my world and my son and my daughter are the prince and princess of it.
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Here chick chick chick!  Moved from a large city to a small town.  There is nothing like seeing the stars in the country.  My family is my world and my son and my daughter are the prince and princess of it.
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post #2 of 8

You want the temp. to be 90 to 95 the first week, decreasing by 5 degrees a week until such time you are down to 70 degrees (end of week 5) at which time they should not normally require added heat. 
Really though, it's best to watch your chicks.  Running around, eating and drinking, sometimes under the light, sometimes not and they are comfortable. 
Loud, distressed-sounding peeping and piling up and they are too cold.  As far away from the heat as possible, sometimes panting and holding their little wings out and they are too hot.
Piling up should not be mistaken for sleeping in a bunch, which they like to do. 
Ideally, you want to have enough room in your brooder that they can self-regulate.  Get to the heat when they need to, be away from it when they need to.

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, bredas and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

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If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people.
A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, cochins, sebrights, bredas and call ducks.  R.I.P. Dragon, the crossbeak.  Thank you for teaching me so much about life.

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post #3 of 8

It should be around 90-95 F for the first week, and then decreased by 5 F every week until your at normal temperature

edit: opps, gritsar beat me to it tongue


Edited by ChickieBooBoo - 12/20/10 at 9:07pm

You haven't seen a tree until you've seen it's shadow from the sky. --Amelia Earhart

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You haven't seen a tree until you've seen it's shadow from the sky. --Amelia Earhart

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post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

ok thanks.

Here chick chick chick!  Moved from a large city to a small town.  There is nothing like seeing the stars in the country.  My family is my world and my son and my daughter are the prince and princess of it.
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Here chick chick chick!  Moved from a large city to a small town.  There is nothing like seeing the stars in the country.  My family is my world and my son and my daughter are the prince and princess of it.
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post #5 of 8

Your chicks will tell you if they are too hot or cold.

This is what you're looking for:

http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/General_Brooding_and_Rearing
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_SxFfd4HLezA/TRDcHJd_2gI/AAAAAAAABSk/4wWqddl7aMc/diagram%205.jpg

I haven't used a thermometer in years since an old timer turned me one to this.

Chance favors the prepared mind.
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Chance favors the prepared mind.
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post #6 of 8

Book wisdom is 90-95 in the first week with temps decreasing by 5 degrees every week.  Personally, My brooder has never gotten that hot.  I'm lucky if I can get the temp up to 85.  I usually start mine upstairs where the air temp is usually 68-70 and their brooder will get to 82-85.  Then after a few weeks (once the smell sets in) they go outside with the heat lamp and depending on the time of year I shoot for about 70-75 degrees.  By weeks 4-5 They're on heat only at night (unless it's middle of summer then they're only heated at night from week 3) and by 6-7 weeks no heat at all.  This also saves on the electric bill, but understand I don't get chicks in February or March when it's still cold out.  I usually get my first babies in April/May and then if I get more I wait till September or Early October (if it's still warm out) and typically my fall chicks consistently do better in cold weather.  I believe it's because they're hardened to it so early. 

Just keep an eye on your birds and you'll see what works for them.  Don't panic over not hitting 90-95 degrees, as long as they're not in a drafty basement then only getting to 80 or 85 will be fine.  Just make sure they stay dry and well fed.

Stonefruit Farm; home to 1 BR, 1 NHR, 2 GLW, 2 EEs, 2 Red Comet, 2 JGs, 1 Ameraucana, 5 Ancona ducks, 9 French Angoras and 1 Dingo
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Stonefruit Farm; home to 1 BR, 1 NHR, 2 GLW, 2 EEs, 2 Red Comet, 2 JGs, 1 Ameraucana, 5 Ancona ducks, 9 French Angoras and 1 Dingo
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post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchwitch 

Book wisdom is 90-95 in the first week with temps decreasing by 5 degrees every week.  Personally, My brooder has never gotten that hot.  I'm lucky if I can get the temp up to 85.  I usually start mine upstairs where the air temp is usually 68-70 and their brooder will get to 82-85.


While it seems to work for you, I need to ask why you can't achieve 100 degrees??  Use a higher wattage bulb.

I'm in MN and usually brood in late March/early April.  Lucky if the temps hit 60.  I have no problem in a un-insulated barn getting up to 95 degrees with 250w bulbs.

Christopher Rathman

Self-Employed Automotive Restorer who should be working, not chatting about chickens
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Christopher Rathman

Self-Employed Automotive Restorer who should be working, not chatting about chickens
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post #8 of 8

Get them out of the box real soon.  Put your chicks in a protected 6 sided quarter inch wire box with a lid, and attach the brooder light in one corner.  They can either be under it if cold or away if too warm. Give plenty of fresh food and water, because medicated chick starter feed makes them eat and grow!!!  Remember, chicks don't stay little teenie very long.  By 3 or 4 weeks, the strong guys will be flying.  Hence, you need the lid. Keep them in the brooder box for up to 6 weeks if you need too, before putting them in a warm protected coop environment.  Don't think it's ok to put them in with older hens until they're 3 months old. Good Luck.  Be Smart. Enjoy.
Irene

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