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A sure-fire cure to all respiratory illness in chickens - Page 4

post #31 of 38

I don't understand the need to "sugar coat" the realities of life to children.  My daughter has been around poultry since she was 2 y.o. and she has seen some things I wish I could have spared her, but the reality of the situation is that these things have made her a stronger person.  She is now a 5 y.o. with a very practical attitude.  She knows about the "circle of life" from first hand experience.  It has not damaged her in any way.  She fully appreciates life, accepts responsibility for the lives of creatures in her care, and understands what is lost when we shirk our responsibilities.  As far as I can see, children deal with these life situations with more aplomb than we as adults do.

post #32 of 38

Well, I'm one of those people with 10 named  lap chickens, and while I'm not offended by the title, or the content of this post, I do have some honest questions someone might be able to answer, is the respiratory illness mentioned here (all over BYC) a virus? or a bacteria? or is it a generic name for a number of possible infections, like what in humans, we call a "cold"? Are there preventive measures that can be taken? And lastly, how quickly does it spread through the flock?

I understand the point that the OP was making, and it is the most reasonable, yet heartbreaking decision to make in that kind of circumstance. I think I'd much rather know how to prevent it, than to ever have to deal with having to make that decision.

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post #33 of 38

Preventing respiratory illness in your flock is mostly a matter of keeping a closed flock, which means bringing in no adult birds from outside sources.  Keeping your flocks away from other chickens and wild birds goes a long way towards preventing any acquired illnesses.  "Colds" are generally bacterial in nature.  Although they are treatable, the mere presence of them renders any exposed birds carriers for life.  Once your flock has had a "cold" they are usually carriers of the disease forever.  Any birds that are brought in from that point on will be exposed to the disease, and either survive it (to become carriers themselves) or die from it.  Any point in the future when your birds are under stress (molting, winter, old age, injuries) the disease will rear its ugly head. 

This why it is important to be responsible about respiratory illnesses.  If your flock has a "cold" it is fine if you have no intention of ever acquiring any new birds or giving away/selling any old birds.  Treat them if you want.  But, if you are wanting to sell/trade/give away birds or hatching eggs, then you need to cull birds that have had a "cold" or have survived being in a flock that has had a "cold".  Period.  The risk of infecting someone else's flock with a dangerous illness is too great, otherwise.

post #34 of 38

Actually I think most chicken respiratory illnesses are caused by viruses, and are not bacterial.  That is why most often it does no good to treat them with antibiotics.  It might mask the symptoms, but doesn't really cure them.  The only way to know for sure what illness you're dealing with is to have one of the sick birds tested.

I'm a Farmer/Rancher  Wife,Mom & Grandma  No Farms, No food. 
If you want house chickens and ducks in diapers then this is the forum for you.
I've got 50+ years of poultry experience, but this 'poultry' forum isn't for me anymore.
If you're going to complain about farmers, don't do it with a full belly or a mouthful.
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I'm a Farmer/Rancher  Wife,Mom & Grandma  No Farms, No food. 
If you want house chickens and ducks in diapers then this is the forum for you.
I've got 50+ years of poultry experience, but this 'poultry' forum isn't for me anymore.
If you're going to complain about farmers, don't do it with a full belly or a mouthful.
Reply
post #35 of 38

Very good to know. Thank you! Is it airborne? Or is it spread through food/water contamination? Fecal exposure?

I'm surprised to hear it passes through the eggs. Very interesting.

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Wild West Serama Club    Bringing Serama Table Top Shows to a CA venue near you!

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my website:  TLC Seramas

 

Wild West Serama Club    Bringing Serama Table Top Shows to a CA venue near you!

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post #36 of 38

Yes, unfortunately culling is just a grim reality.  I don't like to do it, but I've done it for the health of the flock.



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Check out my adventures in homesteading/self sufficiency!:
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post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyCalifornia 

Very good to know. Thank you! Is it airborne? Or is it spread through food/water contamination? Fecal exposure?

I'm surprised to hear it passes through the eggs. Very interesting.


Whether bacterial or viral, most of the diseases still make the bird a carrier, able to infect others even when asymptomatic. Most viruses are airborne and yes, they can also spread through feces or secretions that end up in the food and water. Some diseases can pass down through the egg to the chick, though not all, which means even a newly hatched chick can be a carrier. That is why all newly acquired birds should have a quarantine period, though even that is not a guarantee of health.

This thread has much discussion about disease and quarantine. http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=12751

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Shop our www.blueroocreations.com web store, where every artisan is a veteran or the spouse of a veteran.

The BRC Mascot, Lancelot, says, "Support Our Troops!"

 

Mountain View Heritage Poultry, Home of Nazi Rooster & The One Spur Wonder
Follow Along with The Evolution of Atlas

 

~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 
 

 

 

 

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post #38 of 38

A lot of really good information here. Thanks for broadening my understanding.
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