BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Chicken Breeds › Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the Standard of Perfection › Farming and Homesteading Heritage Poultry
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Farming and Homesteading Heritage Poultry - Page 82

post #811 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashandvine View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow House Farm View Post

Technically they are, but they're eating games for sure.


Arielle always comes up with good questions!  There were lovely Cornish at the congress.  I always liken them to Harley Davidson birds.... they are stocky and their heads look like they are wearing skull caps and goggles to me.

When do most of you worm in the spring?  Right now I am getting just a few eggs IF I find them before they freeze.  I was considering worming before I get into eggs and incubating but then I also wondered if the stress of cold and being cooped in constantly was enough stress to warrant not worming. 

There's so much to consider working with a chicken and trying to make some 'worth' in it.  Sex links for money, meat for you or sale, selling to poo or feathers, egg decorating, breeds that are up to snuff for sale, preservation, pretty/comedy.  IDK how to ever make any of it work much less pick the magic combo. 

I have decided to get some manure from local horses delivered to the house.  I figure it can go in a pile and when the birds come out in spring they will be VERY happy to scratch at it.  I thought about putting it in the pens but I have to lime to keep it from smelling badly right now so no more additions beyond what is mandated by normal chicken activity.
I don't know about your area but where I'm at horse manure is free if you haul. When I leave mine in a pile in the spring (fresh from my horse) in about a month it's got fat, green grubs about as big around as my finger. Not sure what they are but the chickens love them. Later in the year doesn't work, don't know if its hatch cycle, compost heat, or what.
post #812 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow House Farm View Post

 But if you want them, [Buckeyes] go for it!  I believe Warren Carlow might have some.

 

Yes, Warren does indeed have Buckeyes, which I know because I sold him some. And knowing him, he's done a good job with what I sold him, crossed them with someone else's birds, and made them even better. Master breeder, that man is! Which reminds me, I need to get ahold of him and get him in the ABPC...

 

wink.png

post #813 of 2347
Thread Starter 

Well, the fertility check is in on our Dorkings and Anconas.  It has been f)reezing around here 6*-20* by day, nights substantially worse.  Our cops are uninsulated, and we're not using lighting for stimulating.  Both breeds are laying fairly well, and the eggs sit out in the boxes all day until I collect them around 5-5:30pm.  Admittedly on the 6*degree day, there was a good number of split eggs.  The 13* degree day was much better, and the balmy 21* day was smooth sailing.  Dorkings are at 82% fertility/viability; Anconas are at 90% fertility/viability.  I hope (fl.gif) this is a portend of good things to come; sometimes I fear that Murphy is too quick to show up and burst the bubble.  But here's to a January of results.

 

The first Ancona eggs are in the hatcher.  Talk about crossing your fingers.  I'm remembering someone posting about hatching their eggs in the bottom halves of egg cartons.  It is something that has peaked my curiosity.  Currently they're just in hatching trays.

 

Does anyone else have fertility data to share?

Heritage breeds poultry are a doorway to something more vast, something more beautiful.  When we choose to be dedicated to one or two breeds and breed them well, we save their utility for future generations.  Heritage fowl are a special resource.  To be safeguarded, they need breeders that are willing to breed them well, remembering always their heritage as useful farming fowl.  Pax et bonum.
Reply
Heritage breeds poultry are a doorway to something more vast, something more beautiful.  When we choose to be dedicated to one or two breeds and breed them well, we save their utility for future generations.  Heritage fowl are a special resource.  To be safeguarded, they need breeders that are willing to breed them well, remembering always their heritage as useful farming fowl.  Pax et bonum.
Reply
post #814 of 2347

  I have yet to eat a Sumatra egg that wasn't fertile. All 5 this morning were as usual.

post #815 of 2347
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonykill View Post

  I have yet to eat a Sumatra egg that wasn't fertile. All 5 this morning were as usual.

 

Do you do anything insulation-wise or light-wise to stimulate fertility or are they toughing it out?

 

Did you, perhaps, show SUmatras at the Northeastern Poultry Congress?  There is usually a nice bunch there each year.

Heritage breeds poultry are a doorway to something more vast, something more beautiful.  When we choose to be dedicated to one or two breeds and breed them well, we save their utility for future generations.  Heritage fowl are a special resource.  To be safeguarded, they need breeders that are willing to breed them well, remembering always their heritage as useful farming fowl.  Pax et bonum.
Reply
Heritage breeds poultry are a doorway to something more vast, something more beautiful.  When we choose to be dedicated to one or two breeds and breed them well, we save their utility for future generations.  Heritage fowl are a special resource.  To be safeguarded, they need breeders that are willing to breed them well, remembering always their heritage as useful farming fowl.  Pax et bonum.
Reply
post #816 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow House Farm View Post

 

Do you do anything insulation-wise or light-wise to stimulate fertility or are they toughing it out?

 

Did you, perhaps, show SUmatras at the Northeastern Poultry Congress?  There is usually a nice bunch there each year.

  none of the above. No insulation, no artificial light, no showing. Some ...about 30 by their choice live in tree's in the front yard. Rain, sleet, snow , -20 degree's F, they live outdoors like a wild bird. I don't like it, but when they can fly 25 feet up a tree, not much I can do about it. 

 

   I treat them like birds. Birds are built to withstand the elements


Edited by stonykill - 1/26/13 at 9:39am
post #817 of 2347
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonykill View Post

  none of the above. No insulation, no artificial light, no showing. Some ...about 30 by their choice live in tree's in the front yard. Rain, sleet, snow , -20 degree's F, they live outdoors like a wild bird. I don't like it, but when they can fly 25 feet up a tree, not much I can do about it. 

 

   I treat them like birds. Birds are built to withstand the elements

 

I mentioned them n this thread before, but when I was a kid, we had birds around here that e called "bantams", they we more on a game than anything else.  They preferred to live in the trees, too.  It was always fantastic to see them flying up and down from their roosts.  I envy you the spectacle; they must be lovely.

Heritage breeds poultry are a doorway to something more vast, something more beautiful.  When we choose to be dedicated to one or two breeds and breed them well, we save their utility for future generations.  Heritage fowl are a special resource.  To be safeguarded, they need breeders that are willing to breed them well, remembering always their heritage as useful farming fowl.  Pax et bonum.
Reply
Heritage breeds poultry are a doorway to something more vast, something more beautiful.  When we choose to be dedicated to one or two breeds and breed them well, we save their utility for future generations.  Heritage fowl are a special resource.  To be safeguarded, they need breeders that are willing to breed them well, remembering always their heritage as useful farming fowl.  Pax et bonum.
Reply
post #818 of 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow House Farm View Post

 

I mentioned them n this thread before, but when I was a kid, we had birds around here that e called "bantams", they we more on a game than anything else.  They preferred to live in the trees, too.  It was always fantastic to see them flying up and down from their roosts.  I envy you the spectacle; they must be lovely.

  it can be some sight in the morning. They see me and all come flying toward me....for food. Some land on my feet, some of the hens on me hmm.png. Hat and glasses a must 1st thing in the morning around here big_smile.png

post #819 of 2347
Quote:

Originally Posted by Yellow House Farm View Post

 

The first Ancona eggs are in the hatcher.  Talk about crossing your fingers.  I'm remembering someone posting about hatching their eggs in the bottom halves of egg cartons.  It is something that has peaked my curiosity.  Currently they're just in hatching trays.

 

I hatch all of my eggs in the bottoms of egg cartons.  I seems to work fine for me.  We found a great deal on a big commercial incubator that holds 275 chicken eggs.  He man we bought it from raised ostriches and did not have the original chicken egg trays.  So we just put the egg cartons in and they work well enough that we never have bought the replacement trays.  I don't know if this helps at all.

Small town, stay at home mom, with a wonderful husband, three darling young boys, four Catahoula Leopard Hounds, a Bluetick and an ever changing flock of chickens. 

 

Check out my swap page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/cfellows-swap-page

 

Reply

Small town, stay at home mom, with a wonderful husband, three darling young boys, four Catahoula Leopard Hounds, a Bluetick and an ever changing flock of chickens. 

 

Check out my swap page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/cfellows-swap-page

 

Reply
post #820 of 2347

 YHF, my first batch of Catalana eggs are 100% fertile. I candled them last night, and I never turned a light on. They were/are laying up a storm, so I tried it. These guys may be great layers. For such short days . . . I wonder if this will increase? Each are laying 5/6 per week. Large eggs, and they are pullets.

 

 Talking with others, this is typical (that they are real good layers). Even in the winter. Mine are in open pens, but I am in the South. Oh, if I can get a little more meat on these . . . . I just may have something that tickles my fancy. Anyone that knows me, knows that I do not like lazy. I like useful.

 

 They are not even eating that much. Giving them greens is like giving them candy. They eat out of your hands. So much for the flighty idea.

 

 I want to try hatching in carton bottoms to. I want to see for myself. I never have, but the idea caught my attention. I have to come up with a way to seperate carton halves. I am single mating for here on out.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Chicken Breeds › Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the Standard of Perfection › Farming and Homesteading Heritage Poultry