BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Raising Baby Chicks › Does Apple Cider Vinegar Prevent Pasty Butt in Chicks?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Does Apple Cider Vinegar Prevent Pasty Butt in Chicks?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I know from nosing around here that lots of folks put ACV in drinking water for chicks and chickens. Does it prevent pasty butt?

CabinCrazyOne ... cc1 ...
Reply
CabinCrazyOne ... cc1 ...
Reply
post #2 of 16

I just put vitamins in the water and a dab of olive oil around the vent...  Very interested in the answer to this...  I have one that can't quite seem to get over the pasty...

pop

3 royally spoiled cats, 2 very spoiled hens (plus 2 more soon!); 1 exceedingly tolerant DH and 2 beautiful boys!

Brilliant Feathers Urban Farming, LLC
See my listing in the buy-sell-trade section for current availabilities!
Reply
3 royally spoiled cats, 2 very spoiled hens (plus 2 more soon!); 1 exceedingly tolerant DH and 2 beautiful boys!

Brilliant Feathers Urban Farming, LLC
See my listing in the buy-sell-trade section for current availabilities!
Reply
post #3 of 16

I think it does
I also noticed that I seem to get a 2 to 1 ratio in hatching - two hens to one roo
Definiteiyl makes a big health difference

The irony of life! One day you are the windshield and then the next - the bug!!

Reply

The irony of life! One day you are the windshield and then the next - the bug!!

Reply
post #4 of 16

Yes, it does help with pasty butt. I buy Spectrum organic unfiltered ACV from Ingles grocery chain. A couple teaspoons in each quart waterer is all you need.

Come See the ALL NEW Blue Roo Creations, where every artisan is a veteran or the spouse of a veteran!

BRC Web Store Purchases Now Include Shipping!

It Has Come to My Attention that Empathy for Others in Today's World Has Died...URGENT! Always Quarantine Newly Purchased Birds!
~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 
 

 

 

 

Reply

Come See the ALL NEW Blue Roo Creations, where every artisan is a veteran or the spouse of a veteran!

BRC Web Store Purchases Now Include Shipping!

It Has Come to My Attention that Empathy for Others in Today's World Has Died...URGENT! Always Quarantine Newly Purchased Birds!
~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 
 

 

 

 

Reply
post #5 of 16

No. It's a great product to use in other ways but unless it makes the chicks want to drink more, it won't help pasty butts. (If they like the taste it could be a different story.)

Anything that inhibits drinking will make the problem worse. So will a tiny bit too much heat in the brooder. Add the dry commercial feeds (which are fairly low in fibre) to the mix and some degree of pasting is almost guaranteed.

I often moisten the feed very slightly for the first few days, but of course it means a lot more cleaning (damp feed in a warm environment brings fungus etc). I also raise chicks in a long brooder unit with feed and water in the cooler section, so there's less chance of dehydration. I haven't had a chick with pasty butt in a long time so maybe it works. (But I don't use commercial mixes any more either.) A tiny bit of kefir or yoghurt put in a blender with finely chopped greens like kale (nothing that's been sprayed however) given as a treat with their usual feed can be a really good start for chicks and a good way to get past the danger time for pasting.

EDITED TO ADD: apologies, I didn't mean to contradict others (you both posted as I was typing). smile

I hope this helps.
Regards
Erica
http://naturalchicken.blogspot.com


Edited by Erica - 2/21/11 at 10:07am

http://www.permachicken.com Permaculture chicken blog: raising chickens with fewer industrial inputs.

Reply

http://www.permachicken.com Permaculture chicken blog: raising chickens with fewer industrial inputs.

Reply
post #6 of 16

I mix cornmeal with their food and that keeps it away.  With my first chicks I only had one chick in the whole batch get pasty butt.

Nova Scotian photographer and journalist. I've got maybe too many animals and one great husband who puts up with it all.

http://mycluckingchickens.wordpress.com/

Reply

Nova Scotian photographer and journalist. I've got maybe too many animals and one great husband who puts up with it all.

http://mycluckingchickens.wordpress.com/

Reply
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks all, great info.

Erica, you're obviously speaking from experience.

The low fiber in com. feeds makes perfect sense. In another thread, adding chopped oatmeal for chicks would be addressing the fiber thing.
It was mentioned that a pinch of baking soda in the water solves pasty butt. I don't know if it encourages more drinking or what it would do exactly.


editing to add: Comparing the labels on oatmeal and corn meal, the amount of fiber seems to be about the same. That would mean both are a good addition.

I like the idea of greens in yogurt.


Edited by cabincrazyone - 2/21/11 at 10:51am
CabinCrazyOne ... cc1 ...
Reply
CabinCrazyOne ... cc1 ...
Reply
post #8 of 16

Hi cabincrazyone,

Everyone has their methods! My experience definitely isn't huge (I'm still regretting my definite 'no' back there... Like probiotics generally, ACV may help the gut start working more effectively in the beginning so things move along better... I'm not sure but if others say it works I'd be inclined to give it a try).

At any rate though, lamp heat and dry commercial feeds are two known causes so there are many ways of intervening. Baking soda probably acts as a diuretic making the kidneys work harder and the droppings wetter... Not what I'd do, but maybe works? smile

Best of luck with it!

http://www.permachicken.com Permaculture chicken blog: raising chickens with fewer industrial inputs.

Reply

http://www.permachicken.com Permaculture chicken blog: raising chickens with fewer industrial inputs.

Reply
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erica 

Hi cabincrazyone,

Everyone has their methods! My experience definitely isn't huge (I'm still regretting my definite 'no' back there... Like probiotics generally, ACV may help the gut start working more effectively in the beginning so things move along better... I'm not sure but if others say it works I'd be inclined to give it a try).

At any rate though, lamp heat and dry commercial feeds are two known causes so there are many ways of intervening. Baking soda probably acts as a diuretic making the kidneys work harder and the droppings wetter... Not what I'd do, but maybe works? smile

Best of luck with it!


You must be a veterinarian? Or a chicken guru. I wouldn't like to over work the kidneys, so that's out. And really, the fiber and lots of liquids is surely the best answer ... at least from the view of a newbie like me with a bit of common sense.

CabinCrazyOne ... cc1 ...
Reply
CabinCrazyOne ... cc1 ...
Reply
post #10 of 16

I've noticed, over the years, not one chick raised by a broody, adopted or actual offspring, has developed pasty butt.  One batch not brooded by a hen yielded just one chick with pasty butt....ACV added to heat lamped chicks but none to broody hen raised batches. 

Same feeds given, same amount of water given with all chicks.  I'd say it has more to do with heat vs. less heat than it does with feeds or amount of water imbibed.  All my chicks raised by broody did not have supplemental heat in their brood pen...they used good ol' mama warmth as needed. 

I still think it's a good idea to add ACV to the water for the probiotic and vitamin benefits, regardless of prevention qualities for pasty rear.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Raising Baby Chicks
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Raising Baby Chicks › Does Apple Cider Vinegar Prevent Pasty Butt in Chicks?