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Does incubation temperature affect sex of developing chick embryo

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

I'd read something on this before but wasn't sure if the higher temp makes a girl or a boy.  I incubated 23 silkie eggs in 2007, 19 hatched and 17 would be cockerels.  I think maybe temperature at incubation might've been a factor?

post #2 of 20

Wrong temp will kill more males than females so in a way yes but no it wont turn boy eggs in to girl eggs.

post #3 of 20

Nope.... Birds aren't like reptiles that way. The sex of mammals is determined immediately upon fertilization. A result like yours must have been due to genetics. That's a large percentage that hatched... and say they all hatched and the rest were female.. that would be 17 males and 6 females. 75% male to 25% female. A more normal ratio would be 50%/50%.  If you don't want yet more Roos, maybe you shouldn't let them fertilize anything? lau

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         I sought to hear the voice of God,
                                                                        And climbed the topmost steeple.
                  But God declared:
                                                         "Go down again, I dwell among my people."
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post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy 

Nope.... Birds aren't like reptiles that way. The sex of mammals is determined immediately upon fertilization. A result like yours must have been due to genetics. That's a large percentage that hatched... and say they all hatched and the rest were female.. that would be 17 males and 6 females. 75% male to 25% female. A more normal ratio would be 50%/50%.  If you don't want yet more Roos, maybe you shouldn't let them fertilize anything? lau


no , birds sex determined like mammals not reptiles

normal % are 50 /50 thats over very large number, so make you few bad somewhere , somebody got mostly pullets lol

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post #5 of 20

Isen't that what I said? LOL

         I sought to hear the voice of God,
                                                                        And climbed the topmost steeple.
                  But God declared:
                                                         "Go down again, I dwell among my people."
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         I sought to hear the voice of God,
                                                                        And climbed the topmost steeple.
                  But God declared:
                                                         "Go down again, I dwell among my people."
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post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy 

Nope.... Birds aren't like reptiles that way. The sex of mammals is determined immediately upon fertilization. A result like yours must have been due to genetics. That's a large percentage that hatched... and say they all hatched and the rest were female.. that would be 17 males and 6 females. 75% male to 25% female. A more normal ratio would be 50%/50%.  If you don't want yet more Roos, maybe you shouldn't let them fertilize anything? lau


No not what you said.....birds aren't like reptile.......but BIRDS ARE NOT MAMMALS.....unless they have fur(hair).....no biggie didn't see where you said birds sex was at fertilization..........

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post #7 of 20

My understanding is unlike mammals. The female (hen) determines the sex at fertilization.  I've heard so many wives tales about how to get more hens than roos but it's ultimately going to be whatever the hen produces. I did hear somewhere that the ph level in their drinking water could affect the sex ratio however I'd think if anythings been scientifically proven we'd have heard about it by now.

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Plymouth Barred Rocks, Delawares, New Hampshires, Rhode Island Reds,  Bantam Barred Rocks and Bantam Buff Brahmas. But love my mutt bantams too.

 

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post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barred Rocker 

My understanding is unlike mammals. The female (hen) determines the sex at fertilization.  I've heard so many wives tales about how to get more hens than roos but it's ultimately going to be whatever the hen produces. I did hear somewhere that the ph level in their drinking water could affect the sex ratio however I'd think if anythings been scientifically proven we'd have heard about it by now.


Yes sex chromosome are switch from mammals and birds,,,reason albino is carried hiden my women humans and male birds.


Oh just get EE , eat the blue eggs those are the males....lau

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post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by deerman 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barred Rocker 

My understanding is unlike mammals. The female (hen) determines the sex at fertilization.  I've heard so many wives tales about how to get more hens than roos but it's ultimately going to be whatever the hen produces. I did hear somewhere that the ph level in their drinking water could affect the sex ratio however I'd think if anythings been scientifically proven we'd have heard about it by now.


Yes sex chromosome are switch from mammals and birds,,,reason albino is carried hiden my women humans and male birds.


Oh just get EE , eat the blue eggs those are the males....lau


yuckyuck

What color eggs are the girls?

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Picnic thread is up at this location: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/849751/2014-new-york-chickenstock#post_12665106

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post #10 of 20

I read recently, (I think on this forum) of someone doing a study to determine if feeding sorghum increases the ratio of pullets.  One would have to raise a lot of fowl to have a significant sample size.

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