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Inbreeding. Good, bad, doesn't matter?? - Page 2

post #11 of 23

Little info , lot of inbreeding goes on in wild flocks , just like wild animals......i have even seen buck fawn breeding their sister ,and try to mate with his mother.

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post #12 of 23

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Edited by Steve_of_sandspoultry - 7/20/11 at 10:27am
post #13 of 23

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Edited by Steve_of_sandspoultry - 7/20/11 at 10:26am
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_of_sandspoultry 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deerman 

Little info , lot of inbreeding goes on in wild flocks , just like wild animals......i have even seen buck fawn breeding their sister ,and try to mate with his mother.


But Deerman, how can those wild animals ever survive without our help? LOL

Steve


A few do......but not as many as we can raise.



Inbreeding does happen all the time in the wild.........just think a peahen raise 7 peachicks in a area , then don't leave....so sure alot of brother sister mating goes on.......they don't remember their brother ,sister,father ,or mother.

Line and inbreeding ,work if a person culls the faults when they surface........like the bald head gene in the lutino cockatiel.....not many breeders cull those at first....so anytime you line or inbreed you need to cull for faults......most show stock birds are line bred, same with show dogs and etc.

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post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 

I'm talking about brothers and sisters breeding together. One pair will have babies, but then the babies could have babies together. Of course i can sell the babies, but I wouldn't want to sell brothers and sisters to people who want to breed them, is that correct? For breeding using unrelated birds would be best right.

Chickens, turkeys, ducks, peafowl, and doves.
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post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenbird 

I'm talking about brothers and sisters breeding together. One pair will have babies, but then the babies could have babies together. Of course i can sell the babies, but I wouldn't want to sell brothers and sisters to people who want to breed them, is that correct? For breeding using unrelated birds would be best right.


Yes best to not breed brother and sister, unless you have a good purpose like locking in a new color,........just let people you sell them to that they are from same parents.

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post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 

Ok, thanks deerman

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post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by deerman 

Little info , lot of inbreeding goes on in wild flocks , just like wild animals......i have even seen buck fawn breeding their sister ,and try to mate with his mother.


on my property i know the deer are in breeding i have 20+ buck skulls with horns over the last 14 years an i bet 17 of them look identical very cool how the gene has stayed for that long the only diff one i shot from my back stand an i fell it is a diff heard of deer out there pretty cool how it all works.

we work with black,blue,buff,lavender,an white orpingtons,,blue slate turkeys, siver pied  an white peacocks an 2 alpine dairy goats we raise them all on horseshoe hill poultry farm in mansfield connecticut.
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we work with black,blue,buff,lavender,an white orpingtons,,blue slate turkeys, siver pied  an white peacocks an 2 alpine dairy goats we raise them all on horseshoe hill poultry farm in mansfield connecticut.
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post #19 of 23

Inbreeding with chickens and turkeys is different than with peafowl. Chickens and turkeys are not kept for very long, so if inbreeding results in shorter lifespans, it's not noticed. In the wild, there are many mechanisms which work to reduce inbreeding. One is differential sex dispersal -- one sex remains, the other wanders off. Inbreeding in the wild is not a normal, regular, common occurrence. It happens when habitats are fragmented, populations are reduced, etc. I'll go into it more when I have time, but here's something to think about -- peafowl are not chickens. While they have some similarities with regards to care, they live long lives and are not consumed for food (generally). Chicken keepers are looking for maximum productivity with minimal input. This is understandable when raising a species for food, but since peafowl aren't raised for that purpose, perhaps they'd be better off from an aviculturist or zoologist perspective. With this, animals are bred for long-term captive populations in mind, not for cranking out as many as possible.

Ack, have to get to lab....be back later.

post #20 of 23

Not all chickens are raised for meat..... have a heck of a time getting anything out of all my fancy bantam chickens, especially my Silkied Seramas.. LOL. Most of the people I sell to do not eat their birds either, they enjoy having fancy chickens, showing etc.... so same goals are being used as breeding peafowl... good type, attitude, color. With any breeding program, and like stated closed flocks, their are line and inbreeding going on somewhere, yes even in the wild. Like deerman stated.. in wild many chicks stay around momma, and are bound to breed to someone related. They are not like horses that drive off young males etc... but it occurs there to. the best thing is to know what your goal is, know what you have, do not use those with genetic faults that will hinder what you are after, be honest to who you sell your birds too and strive to better your breed. big_smile

My Heart is Broken... I miss you my Sweet Sophie Puff Diva Chicken....
Living and working on a Zoo farm - 300 plus chickens, fancy pigeons, Sebbies geese, turkey, crested ducks, peafowl, ornamental pheasant and ducks, Black swans, Egyptian geese, African Crowned Cranes, Emu, fainting goats, mini zebu, mini horses,mini donkey, alpacas, llamas, horses, 5 Great Pyrenees and a cat.
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My Heart is Broken... I miss you my Sweet Sophie Puff Diva Chicken....
Living and working on a Zoo farm - 300 plus chickens, fancy pigeons, Sebbies geese, turkey, crested ducks, peafowl, ornamental pheasant and ducks, Black swans, Egyptian geese, African Crowned Cranes, Emu, fainting goats, mini zebu, mini horses,mini donkey, alpacas, llamas, horses, 5 Great Pyrenees and a cat.
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