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Cream Legbars - Page 1076

post #10751 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fire Ant Farm View Post
 

Update:  I drove to Gonzales this morning to the Texas A&M Poultry Diagnostic Lab (it took about 1.5 hours to get there). The director/vet, Dr. Ficken, came out to get the info and history from me while the person behind the desk was getting my other info. He was great - we talked through what I had seen in Paula's necropsy, and then he told me what findings he would look for that would indicate Avian Leukosis vs. Mareks. He started on it right when I left, and he called me on my phone with results before I even made it back to San Antonio! (That's quick!). 

 

Preliminary findings indicate it was Avian Leukosis (NOT Mareks). I need to digest this and its implications for my flock, and do some more reading. What a drag - but I'm very glad to have gotten the necropsy and to know that I was wrong and it's not Mareks. 

 

- Ant Farm 


I am very sorry.

 

This says that this virus is in almost every poultry flock

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/poultry/neoplasms/lymphoid_leukosis_in_poultry.html

Quote:
 the infection is known to exist in virtually all chicken flocks except for some SPF flocks from which it has been eradicated. Tumor mortality commonly accounts for ~1%–2% of birds, with occasional losses of ≥20%. Subclinical infection, to which most flocks are subject, decreases several important performance traits, including egg production and quality. The frequency of infection has been reduced substantially in the primary breeding stocks of several commercial poultry breeding companies, particularly egg-type breeders. In recent years this control program has expanded, and infection has become infrequent or absent in certain commercial flocks. The frequency of lymphoid leukosis tumors even in heavily infected flocks is typically low (<4%), and disease is often inapparent. As much as 1.5% excess mortality per wk has been reported in commercial broiler-breeder flocks naturally infected with subgroup J avian leukosis viru

Diane

 

D's Birds & Bees

Working Class Canine Wildlife Recovery

Frontier Rottweilers

Dogs by Diane Portraits

 

Barnevelders, Crested Cream Legbars, Delawares

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Diane

 

D's Birds & Bees

Working Class Canine Wildlife Recovery

Frontier Rottweilers

Dogs by Diane Portraits

 

Barnevelders, Crested Cream Legbars, Delawares

Reply
post #10752 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fire Ant Farm View Post
 


I will refer you to the Marek's article on BYC to explain more in depth, but some breeds/strains/birds are more susceptible - including some Cream Legbars. I had never had chickens before, nor did any occupants of the property for 30 years before I owned it, but there are chickens in the neighborhood. My first birds were Cream Legbars, and two of three got it. (They were vaccinated as chicks.) It tends to become symptomatic at POL most frequently. 

 

All my other non CL birds are totally fine - in a yard with a couple birds that in retrospect were massively shedding the virus while ill - so they are likely resistant. I have one CL hen who has not gotten sick, and rooster is fine, so I'm pinning hopes of my backyard CLs on this pair. If that doesn't work out, I may need to back out of keeping CLs...

 

I will point out that because it wasn't collected quite ideally, while my personal necropsy results indicated Mareks, I didn't send a sample off from Paula to get tested. If/when this girl passes, I will get a necropsy and testing performed to ensure it is not avian leukosis (just so I know, as they're a bit different). 

 

- Ant Farm 


My vet didn't bother wasting my $$$ to do blood tests, x-rays, or necropsy on 2 hens I took to him this past year and I didn't insist.  He says the results many times indicate cancer but not always conclusive as to what the cause might be.  He also said that Marek's is not a disease that every chicken in the flock will display symptoms but that birds that survive the symptoms may still die later in 2-3 yrs from cancer growths yet other hens may never contract the disease or have symptoms.  Sometimes a report states Marek's "suspected" but nothing conclusive - so frustrating since so many other maladies display the same outcome.  Marek's vaccinations as chicks have to be followed up with "booster" shots but I don't know the details.  It is difficult but the best route seems to be trying to breed for disease-resistance since the Marek's vaccination is not guaranteed to deter all 5 different strains of Marek's.

post #10753 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylvester017 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fire Ant Farm View Post
 


I will refer you to the Marek's article on BYC to explain more in depth, but some breeds/strains/birds are more susceptible - including some Cream Legbars. I had never had chickens before, nor did any occupants of the property for 30 years before I owned it, but there are chickens in the neighborhood. My first birds were Cream Legbars, and two of three got it. (They were vaccinated as chicks.) It tends to become symptomatic at POL most frequently. 

 

All my other non CL birds are totally fine - in a yard with a couple birds that in retrospect were massively shedding the virus while ill - so they are likely resistant. I have one CL hen who has not gotten sick, and rooster is fine, so I'm pinning hopes of my backyard CLs on this pair. If that doesn't work out, I may need to back out of keeping CLs...

 

I will point out that because it wasn't collected quite ideally, while my personal necropsy results indicated Mareks, I didn't send a sample off from Paula to get tested. If/when this girl passes, I will get a necropsy and testing performed to ensure it is not avian leukosis (just so I know, as they're a bit different). 

 

- Ant Farm 


My vet didn't bother wasting my $$$ to do blood tests, x-rays, or necropsy on 2 hens I took to him this past year and I didn't insist.  He says the results many times indicate cancer but not always conclusive as to what the cause might be.  He also said that Marek's is not a disease that every chicken in the flock will display symptoms but that birds that survive the symptoms may still die later in 2-3 yrs from cancer growths yet other hens may never contract the disease or have symptoms.  Sometimes a report states Marek's "suspected" but nothing conclusive - so frustrating since so many other maladies display the same outcome.  Marek's vaccinations as chicks have to be followed up with "booster" shots but I don't know the details.  It is difficult but the best route seems to be trying to breed for disease-resistance since the Marek's vaccination is not guaranteed to deter all 5 different strains of Marek's.


As a follow up, I took the pullet to the Texas A&M Poultry Diagnostic Lab this morning, and preliminary results indicate Avian Leukosis - caused by a virus that causes lymphomatous tumors like Mareks, but somewhat different in cell type and distribution. It's important to know the difference because Avian Leukosis is transmitted in hatching eggs (and then the chicks are infected), while Marek's is not. When they are infected at a very young age, it leads to the tumors, as I understand (still have more reading to do, but that's what I've gleaned so far). 

 

I'm very happy to have access to such a good lab and vet pathologist...

 

- Ant Farm 

post #10754 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by rottlady View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fire Ant Farm View Post
 

Update:  I drove to Gonzales this morning to the Texas A&M Poultry Diagnostic Lab (it took about 1.5 hours to get there). The director/vet, Dr. Ficken, came out to get the info and history from me while the person behind the desk was getting my other info. He was great - we talked through what I had seen in Paula's necropsy, and then he told me what findings he would look for that would indicate Avian Leukosis vs. Mareks. He started on it right when I left, and he called me on my phone with results before I even made it back to San Antonio! (That's quick!). 

 

Preliminary findings indicate it was Avian Leukosis (NOT Mareks). I need to digest this and its implications for my flock, and do some more reading. What a drag - but I'm very glad to have gotten the necropsy and to know that I was wrong and it's not Mareks. 

 

- Ant Farm 


I am very sorry.

 

This says that this virus is in almost every poultry flock

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/poultry/neoplasms/lymphoid_leukosis_in_poultry.html

Quote:
 the infection is known to exist in virtually all chicken flocks except for some SPF flocks from which it has been eradicated. Tumor mortality commonly accounts for ~1%–2% of birds, with occasional losses of ≥20%. Subclinical infection, to which most flocks are subject, decreases several important performance traits, including egg production and quality. The frequency of infection has been reduced substantially in the primary breeding stocks of several commercial poultry breeding companies, particularly egg-type breeders. In recent years this control program has expanded, and infection has become infrequent or absent in certain commercial flocks. The frequency of lymphoid leukosis tumors even in heavily infected flocks is typically low (<4%), and disease is often inapparent. As much as 1.5% excess mortality per wk has been reported in commercial broiler-breeder flocks naturally infected with subgroup J avian leukosis viru


Yep, I had read that as well. But not all birds breeds are affected - there's susceptibility, and also how young they were infected. I have a group of CLs approaching POL that were infected in the egg. I've got some hard decisions ahead of me...

 

- Ant Farm 

post #10755 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fire Ant Farm View Post
 


As a follow up, I took the pullet to the Texas A&M Poultry Diagnostic Lab this morning, and preliminary results indicate Avian Leukosis - caused by a virus that causes lymphomatous tumors like Mareks, but somewhat different in cell type and distribution. It's important to know the difference because Avian Leukosis is transmitted in hatching eggs (and then the chicks are infected), while Marek's is not. When they are infected at a very young age, it leads to the tumors, as I understand (still have more reading to do, but that's what I've gleaned so far). 

 

I'm very happy to have access to such a good lab and vet pathologist...

 

- Ant Farm 


Good to have a lab nearby.  Our nearest college has an agricultural department for livestock studies but hasn't expanded research to poultry yet but have plans to expand so I keep following their agricultural studies until they start a poultry division.  The next county over about 1.5 hrs drive has Redlands University that does necropsies but they want a sick chicken to study/monitor in the laboratory until it dies and then do a necropsy.  With my pets I don't have the heart to leave it in a cold laboratory environment with strangers to poke and prod at it daily until it finally dies sick, confused, and alone.  My vet worked in the poultry industry before he was a vet and has a broad knowledge of the types of diseases/symptoms common with meat and layer chickens - I am comfortable when he talks "chicken" as it verifies research I've already done on my own.  When he or I mention a disease to each other its like neither of us has to explain what it is to the other.

post #10756 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bantambird View Post



His crest is getting crazier and crazier!


That's good!

post #10757 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by laseterlass View Post

May I ask which is prefered on a roo?



Or


The first one looks like he has better type and better barring.

The second one has more correct cream color with matching saddle and hackle feathers.

They are both workable for breeding groups if you have hens to help balance specific elements that you would like to work on.

With time, you may be able to then cross the two groups.

post #10758 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by mellcrowl View Post

I was able to get some pics of my birds this morning. Any critiques are welcome:) I'm pretty happy with my little roo right now and I've been surprised by how straight his comb has stayed considering how large his crest is. The girls are doing good too, and looking good. They are 10 weeks old now.




Not the best picture but you can really start to see the cream coming in in the little rooster's saddle.

Yes, he looks cream, with some chestnut.

post #10759 of 10992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylvester017 View Post
 


Good to have a lab nearby.  Our nearest college has an agricultural department for livestock studies but hasn't expanded research to poultry yet but have plans to expand so I keep following their agricultural studies until they start a poultry division.  The next county over about 1.5 hrs drive has Redlands University that does necropsies but they want a sick chicken to study/monitor in the laboratory until it dies and then do a necropsy.  With my pets I don't have the heart to leave it in a cold laboratory environment with strangers to poke and prod at it daily until it finally dies sick, confused, and alone.  My vet worked in the poultry industry before he was a vet and has a broad knowledge of the types of diseases/symptoms common with meat and layer chickens - I am comfortable when he talks "chicken" as it verifies research I've already done on my own.  When he or I mention a disease to each other its like neither of us has to explain what it is to the other.


Hi, are you aware of the UC Davis labs?  They will provide a necropsy for free.  While it won't save the chicken, it may help with the rest of the flock.  Let me know if you need the info.  The bird can be shipped or you can deliver.

post #10760 of 10992
Hi all
I breed and show cream legbars
And this is the best hen of this years hatching.
What do you think of her
Would you think she is good enough to to show?
And tell me where I would get marks and loose etc
Thanks in advance
Just to say she is 17 weeks.

I breed and show
Gold partridge pekin bantam
Coronation Sussex bantam
Barbu d'Anver quail colour
Black bantam silkie
Cream legbar
Reply
I breed and show
Gold partridge pekin bantam
Coronation Sussex bantam
Barbu d'Anver quail colour
Black bantam silkie
Cream legbar
Reply
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