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post #11 of 16

I know this post is from FOREVER ago but maybe there's someone else like me only looking at this now. I recently had an issue with mastitis in our new Jersey cow. The milk tasted very salty. YUCK! I tried using penicillin but it didnt seem to work for me. I went to my local store and they had natural products that work for mastitis. I thought I'd give them a try. The product was called Yellow Jacket...weird right? This stuff worked great! It only took a week to get rid of her mastitis and I didnt have to dump any of the milk. This is what I did...

 

I milked out my cow then put 30 ml of the Yellow Jacket in the bad teat.

The next milking a squirted out all the bad milk which was about 10-15 squirts.

Then I milked her out again and put another 30 ml in. 

I did this for 4 milkings in a row then I stopped!

I gave her a full week to the mastitis to clean out.

Of course I kept milking her for that period. I just squirted the mastitis out before each milking. The gentleman at the store said it will look worse before it gets better because it is cleaning out the infection. It sure did look worse at first but it worked great and I didnt have to dump any of the milk!

 

They also had a good herbal cream that I rubbed on the udder and that has been very helpful. They have a website where you can buy all of this. Give it a try! www.synergyanimalproducts.com

post #12 of 16
If anyone has read James Herriott's books ( the veterinarian in England) he has a story about a cow with mastitis. That's what the treatment was, to use warm compresses, and grease....some kind of lard I think the farmer used..to make the udder more pliable. The farmer milked the cow all night, and most of the milk was pretty nasty, but She was cured by morning.
Humankind has not woven the web of life.  We are but one thread within it.  Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.  All things are bound together.  All things connect.

Chief Seattle
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Humankind has not woven the web of life.  We are but one thread within it.  Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.  All things are bound together.  All things connect.

Chief Seattle
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post #13 of 16
Being an ex dairy farmer you can't cure mastitis over night, it's an infection that requires antibiotics. I did enjoy reading James Herriot though.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

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Some of my birds.
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #14 of 16

The case of mastitis Herriot outlined had a very unexpected and atypical outcome. It surprised him and that is the reason he wrote about it at all. That particular  farmer had spent the entire night milking out and massaging the udder with goose grease. The goose grease wasn't important.  The fact that he kept massaging the affected quarter and stripping out the infected milk was. The organism which causes the so-called summer mastitis, which that cow had, is carried by flies and is not one we typically see here. At least I never have. Maybe other people have. As I remember it was a corynebacterium, but I may be wrong about that.  It has been quite a few years since I last read that book. I have treated a number of animals with mastitis, but I have never tried massaging and stripping the udder the whole night through, nor have I ever met anyone who did. Except for that one farmer, I don't think Herriot ever did either.  Like oldhenlikesdogs, I just infused the appropriate antibiotics and let them do their job.

The obscure we understand eventually. 
The obvious takes a little longer.
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The obscure we understand eventually. 
The obvious takes a little longer.
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post #15 of 16
I do remember that about the flies now. . Anyway, it was an interesting story, and thankfully we do have antibiotics now. We don't have cows but I can't imagine all that stripping and milking is a whole lot of fun for the cow or the person miking either.
Edited by chicknmania - 4/9/16 at 8:16pm
Humankind has not woven the web of life.  We are but one thread within it.  Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.  All things are bound together.  All things connect.

Chief Seattle
Reply
Humankind has not woven the web of life.  We are but one thread within it.  Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.  All things are bound together.  All things connect.

Chief Seattle
Reply
post #16 of 16
Most milking is done by machines now, though a cow with mastitis needs a bit of rubbing on the bad quarter to help break stuff up.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
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