New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

finisher vs. grower feed

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I went to the feed store and asked for grower and the lady corrected me and called it finisher. I bought the 50lb bag and am now wondering if I got the wrong thing. Is there a difference between the 2 feeds? I thought I read where the finisher is for the chickens who end up as meat. I'm raising mine to help me in the garden and provide eggs. My girls are only 3 1/2 weeks old. Also, when should I start introducing their new feed? When do I give them grit? And, when do I give them oyster shell? Thanks!

post #2 of 5

Typically a starter/grower is higher protein (20-24%)for the 1st 8 weeks and the grower/finisher from 8 weeks to about 17 weeks (~18% protein), then I start them on the layer feed.  They need the extra protein as chicks. 

I don't provide grit while they are chicks, it's really not necessary while they are on the commercial feed.  You can put it out in the run later, however if they are free ranging, they won't need grit at all. 

For oyster shell, put that out when they start to lay.  It's not the end of the world if you don't use oyster shells...  I've gone awhile without it and the eggs were fine - but only when using the commercial layer feed. 

I'm thinking you need to save that finisher until they are older.  Go back and get some starter or start and grow.  But, if you happen to give them the finisher for a few days, again not the end of the world.  Just get the starter when you can. smile


welcome-byc


Edited by Gallusfarm - 6/10/11 at 3:25pm
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Great-thanks for the advice.

post #4 of 5

Starter --
A balanced feed meant as the sole ration for chicks from hatching to twelve weeks of age.
At 12 weeks of age the birds can be changed to Grower or Developer. Starter can be Medicated or Non-Medicated when Medicated it is with either Amprolium or Lasalocid. Starter is available in Mash, Crumble or Pellet form

Stater/ Grower --
A balanced feed meant as the sole ration for chicks from hatching to chickens begin to lay, this feed can be Medicated or Non-Medicated. If medicated it will be with either Amprolium or Lasalocid. Starter/ Grower is available mostly in Crumble or Pellet form.

Grower --
Feed as the sole ration to chicks 12 weeks of age as a finisher. Grower feed is meant to feed until the chickens begin to lay, then bird can be switched to a complete Laying. Most Grower feed is Non-Medicated but some are Medicated with Bacitracin. Grower is mostly available in available in Crumble or Pellet form.

Finisher  -- See above for Grower

Layer --
Feed as the sole diet to laying hens maximum production of eggs. Do not feed Layer feed to poultry, which are not in production because of the high calcium levels in the diet. This is particularly true of young growing birds. Layer is available in Mash, Crumble or Pellet form.

Layer/ Breeder --
Feed as the sole diet to laying hens and breeders for maximum production and for improved hatchability. Do not feed Layer feed to poultry, which are not in production because of the high calcium levels in the diet. This is particularly true of young growing birds. Layer/ Breeder is available in Pellet form.

* Note -- Amprolium - which goes by the trade names Corid and Amprovine, Amprolium, Amprol, Anticoccid and is a thiamine analog, competitively inhibits the active transport of thiamine (B1).   
The second type of medication used is,
Lasalocid - goes by the trade name Bovatec. Bovatec (lasalocid) is a coccidiocide that kills coccidia. It is an ionophore that moves potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium into the cell causing the cell to burst. Bovatec works primarily on a single developmental stage of coccidia, providing a more narrow range of action than Deccox.
Bacitracin -  Bacitracin can also go by the names Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate and BMD. Bacitracin in Broiler And Replacement Chickens is an aid in prevention and control of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens susceptible to bacitracin methylene disalicylate.

Scratch Grain/ Corn (Maze) --
Is mostly used as a treat and should for the most part be feed separate from there sole feed (example - there Layer feed). Scratch should not exceed 40% of there diet when feeding a high protein feed. (Sole feed 20% protein or better) You may start feeding Scratch Grain at around 12 weeks of age.

Oyster Shells --
A Calcium supplement used to increase intake of laying fowl. Oyster Shells should not be offered to Non-Laying Fowl (Chicks, Growers, Non-Laying Hens and Roosters).

Sprouts --
Sprouts may be fed as a treat. There are many "Recipes" for Sprouting Grains some better than others but most work in the same way, to improve forage.

Now with that being said I feed Kent Feed Game Bird feed (28% protein) from hatch to laying then I switch to Buckeye Layer Breeder.
When chicks are 12 weeks old I start mixing in some Pigeon Grain, and Black Oil Sunflower Seed in to the Game Bird feed to drop the protein some.

Chris


Edited by Chris09 - 6/10/11 at 5:12pm

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

My chickens thank you and I thank you too.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Feeding & Watering Your Flock