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How can i scare off a HUGE owl?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

It must be a great horned owl, because it is HUGE! Never saw one in real life... i am just amazed how big these guy are...
Anyways...its taken a sudden interest in my chicken pen... we saw him the other day perching close by and just watching them.
NO attacks yet... but i'm sure it wont be long. sad

I prefer an ugly truth to a pretty lie. If someone is telling me the truth that is when i will give my heart. ~ Jack Nicholson 

Look! A ladder!! Maybe it leads to heaven, or a sandwich... 

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I prefer an ugly truth to a pretty lie. If someone is telling me the truth that is when i will give my heart. ~ Jack Nicholson 

Look! A ladder!! Maybe it leads to heaven, or a sandwich... 

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post #2 of 28

If you have a paintball gun or  pellet gun the next time you see it just go outside and either put a few in him or put some right next to him and just do that everytime you see him. Eventually he should realize he isnt welcome and leave your chickens alone.

post #3 of 28

I'd be very careful about shooting anything at a Great Horned owl that could kill it (like a pellet gun) - they are protected. How secure is your coop? Do you have an enclosed run? Do your chickens go in at night? Some solutions - Make sure they're in the coop well before dusk and don't let them out too early in the day. Beef up your run. Beef up your coop. There is always some risk to free ranging (if you're doing that). If they're safely in a coop and run, they should be fine.

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #4 of 28

Hide in the bushes and jump out and yell HOO



or is that Boo?



Nevermind, onward Clyde......  hide

I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. - Mark Twain

Whippoorwill Creek Farm, St Cloud, Florida

Hatching eggs, chicks and started birds available in season. CSA garden forming now.

 

 

My Barn and Coop Page

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I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. - Mark Twain

Whippoorwill Creek Farm, St Cloud, Florida

Hatching eggs, chicks and started birds available in season. CSA garden forming now.

 

 

My Barn and Coop Page

About Me

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post #5 of 28

Foxhunter is right. It is obviously there for free meals and you need to convince it that your chickens aren't worth it. Personally, I am growing weary of the idea that everything that attacks or threatens to attack my chickens, whether by land, sea, or air is protected, but my chickens are not. I am just supposed to take a lawn chair, crack a can of beer, and sit back to watch this "wonder of nature" tear one of my chickens to shreds.

One DW (very patient!), one Shih Zhu, one Golden Retriever, 6 koi, 24 goldfish, countless wild birds of many species at the feeders, and 4 partridge rock, 5 plymouth rock, and 5 silver laced wyandottes!!
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One DW (very patient!), one Shih Zhu, one Golden Retriever, 6 koi, 24 goldfish, countless wild birds of many species at the feeders, and 4 partridge rock, 5 plymouth rock, and 5 silver laced wyandottes!!
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post #6 of 28

The short answer is that you probably can't.  You'll just have to protect your birds in such a way that it can't get at them and hope it gives up.  They are Federally and State protected so shooting at or harming them in any way can lead to fines so don't advertise it if you do.

I live on 7.5 acres in the western Catskill foothills where I have a 3200 sq.ft veggie garden, 100-plant blueberry patch as well as strawberry and raspberry patches, 4 cats and over 4 dozen chickens: Black Stars, RIR's,  EE's, Brown leghorns, BR's, Buff Orpingtons, Black Australops (including one very happy EE rooster) plus 16 guinea fowl. I've been keeping chickens since I was in high school...



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I live on 7.5 acres in the western Catskill foothills where I have a 3200 sq.ft veggie garden, 100-plant blueberry patch as well as strawberry and raspberry patches, 4 cats and over 4 dozen chickens: Black Stars, RIR's,  EE's, Brown leghorns, BR's, Buff Orpingtons, Black Australops (including one very happy EE rooster) plus 16 guinea fowl. I've been keeping chickens since I was in high school...



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post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mississippifarmboy 

Hide in the bushes and jump out and yell HOO



or is that Boo?



Nevermind, onward Clyde......  hide


X 2  barniebarniebarniebarniebarniebarniebarniebarnie

Friends are the family you make for yourself.
There are no coincidences- only providences.
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Friends are the family you make for yourself.
There are no coincidences- only providences.
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post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbi-j 

I'd be very careful about shooting anything at a Great Horned owl that could kill it (like a pellet gun) - they are protected. How secure is your coop? Do you have an enclosed run? Do your chickens go in at night? Some solutions - Make sure they're in the coop well before dusk and don't let them out too early in the day. Beef up your run. Beef up your coop. There is always some risk to free ranging (if you're doing that). If they're safely in a coop and run, they should be fine.


I agree.
I have one perched next to my house every morning looking toward the field where the mice, rabbits and squirrels roam but he's always gone by sun up. Birds kept in from before dusk to after dawn aren't in much danger from an owl being night hunters.

God bless the entire world - no exceptions.
Honey Bees, Black Penedesencas, among others

 

NPIP 43-813

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God bless the entire world - no exceptions.
Honey Bees, Black Penedesencas, among others

 

NPIP 43-813

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post #9 of 28

This may not help you at all; I have never been able to figure out how to implement it here myself.  I visited a farm in Alaska last year where they raised chickens.  Eagles are very prevalent there and there is no such thing as SSS where they are concerned.  This was near the coast in Kenai Pennisula area (beautiful country) where a lot of fishing is done.  They had a large pole in the center of their coop and attached a large fishing net from the pole to the sides of the pen tent fashion.

There are predator guards that flash lights that are supposed to work with night predators including owls.  Would a light in the area help?  Can you put bird netting over the pen.  I hung a sturdy string with multiple shiney objects attached (alluminum pie pans, etc) across my pen and it seemed to help deter hawks but you would need a light source for it to reflect to be effective at night.

While owls are nocturnal don't feel that your chickens will be totally safe if you lock them in at night.  I have seen owls perched in my yard mid day.  Like other predators that are nocturnal sometimes they get hungry enough to hunt in day light.

post #10 of 28

Put out a few crow decoys. The owl will leave for sure. I feed the crows here and they keep all the hawks and owls away.

DO NOT shoot the owl. Federally protected and you will have big trouble ifen they catch you.

17 acres in rural NJ 19 chickens..7 pigs...dog..bunnie...cat. Life is Good.
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17 acres in rural NJ 19 chickens..7 pigs...dog..bunnie...cat. Life is Good.
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