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Neutering Roosters - Page 2

post #11 of 79

Maybe you could just keep them until you can find good homes for them. I saw roosters listed on craigslist in our area and they  sold really fast. Just a thought.

Wife to 1 very patient husband, 4 precious children, 1 golden retriever, 1 border collie australian shepherd mix , 3 cats, 13 tropical fish, 1 snake, Mixed flock of brown egg layers (12), and 3 guineas .
"The earth is the Lord's and everything in it."  Psalm 24:1
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Wife to 1 very patient husband, 4 precious children, 1 golden retriever, 1 border collie australian shepherd mix , 3 cats, 13 tropical fish, 1 snake, Mixed flock of brown egg layers (12), and 3 guineas .
"The earth is the Lord's and everything in it."  Psalm 24:1
coop page:  http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=9455
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post #12 of 79
Thread Starter 

Thank you!  I will post more information as I get it.  I'm talking further with the vet later today.

post #13 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by fullhouse 

Chickens aren't like dogs and cats in that if they mate you don't just "get" babies.  You get eggs, which you can eat.


fullhouse,
I have been curious about this too. I have a single 13 week roo right now in a suburban area that I would like to keep (he has so much personality) along with my 4 pullets. I don't think there are any specific ordinances in the county I live in against roosters, just noise. I had another roo that I gave away a few weeks ago because I knew for sure 2 was out of the question, but I will be so sad if I have to let this one go too sad If I can keep his crowing under control, do I need to do anything special to make sure I don't get baby chicks? Will my hens be broody knowing their eggs are fertilized? I had no idea you could neuter a rooster, but I would be interested in learning more about this as well. Is there an age cut off for being able to do the procedure?

post #14 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by archmichelle 

do I need to do anything special to make sure I don't get baby chicks? Will my hens be broody knowing their eggs are fertilized?


All you need to do is fridgerate the eggs (or, really, just *don't* incubate them, but refrigerating them is better). The embryo only develops if sat on by a warm hen or hen-like object such as an incubator.

Broodiness does not AFAIK have anything to do with fertilized vs fertilized - hens can go broody even without any roo around. Just depends on the breed, the individual, and the time of year.

Good luck,

Pat

post #15 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by archmichelle 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fullhouse 

Chickens aren't like dogs and cats in that if they mate you don't just "get" babies.  You get eggs, which you can eat.


fullhouse,
I have been curious about this too. I have a single 13 week roo right now in a suburban area that I would like to keep (he has so much personality) along with my 4 pullets. I don't think there are any specific ordinances in the county I live in against roosters, just noise. I had another roo that I gave away a few weeks ago because I knew for sure 2 was out of the question, but I will be so sad if I have to let this one go too sad If I can keep his crowing under control, do I need to do anything special to make sure I don't get baby chicks? Will my hens be broody knowing their eggs are fertilized? I had no idea you could neuter a rooster, but I would be interested in learning more about this as well. Is there an age cut off for being able to do the procedure?


Yep, just eat the eggs or stick them in the fridge. 

I am also in the same grey area and hope for a quiet roo out of our chicks.

Andrea
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Andrea
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post #16 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by archmichelle 

I have been curious about this too. I have a single 13 week roo right now in a suburban area that I would like to keep (he has so much personality) along with my 4 pullets.


There are several things to keep in mind. First, the personality of your cockerel at 13 weeks is likely to change dramatically once he matures. This is not to say that he will turn into a monster, just that he has not fully matured and his hormines have not kicked in fully. Second, neutering, caponizing, castrating, whatever you want to call it, will very likely change the personality of the rooster entirely. It will not "keep" him in any state as you are removing one of the most important hormones in his body. He will not keep looking like a rooster as the lack of sex hormones will no longer produce the secondary sex characteristics. I am not saying that it is cruel or wrong. I think that as long as the surgery is done in a safe and appropriate way it would not necessarily be a problem but I think the owner should not have any misconception of what the resulting animal will be like.

Richard

Copper Black Marans, Silver Sebrights, Dutch Bantams, LF Buff Cochins, BLRW, Showgirls and a few Odds and Ends
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Copper Black Marans, Silver Sebrights, Dutch Bantams, LF Buff Cochins, BLRW, Showgirls and a few Odds and Ends
My BackYardChickens Page
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post #17 of 79

I have been wondering the same thing, so thanks for posting this question.  Let me make sure I understand the responses:
1.  Neutering the rooster does not guarantee that he will remain sweet.
2.  It does not guarantee he will not crow.
3.  It does not guarantee he will not fight with other birds.
3.  He may not get his pretty rooster feathers because his hormones are altered.

Am I correct in my understanding?  If so, boo hoo.  I won't try it.  I was hoping I might find a way to keep my sweet rooster without the crowing, fighting, and I want the roo plumage!
ps. anyone need a sweet, gorgeous, speckled sussex roo 8 weeks old?

Renee
Sam the Dog, Sam the Cat, Quasimodo (Silver-laced Wyandotte), Blanched (Columbian Wyandotte) Marie Curie (Gold Comet), and Mikey.
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Renee
Sam the Dog, Sam the Cat, Quasimodo (Silver-laced Wyandotte), Blanched (Columbian Wyandotte) Marie Curie (Gold Comet), and Mikey.
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post #18 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by patandchickens 

All you need to do is fridgerate the eggs (or, really, just *don't* incubate them, but refrigerating them is better). The embryo only develops if sat on by a warm hen or hen-like object such as an incubator.

Broodiness does not AFAIK have anything to do with fertilized vs fertilized - hens can go broody even without any roo around. Just depends on the breed, the individual, and the time of year.

Good luck,

Pat


I am so glad this was said...we have a rooster...we are keeping him, and my young son will be selling eggs once the 22 girls start laying (we have a list of people wanting them a mile long) Any way we keep looking at one another saying  "how do we sell eggs that are fertil, or that could be". We dont want to sell an egg to someone and have them crack it open and find a baby <shudder>
So...we just need to colect them daily and put them in the fridge???

(sorry didnt mean to  http://www.runemasterstudios.com/graemlins/images/hijack.gif

GopherBoy, and ~Tiff~
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GopherBoy, and ~Tiff~
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post #19 of 79

I'd say keeping them together growing up would reduce fighting. I've got two roos in the same dog kennel cage with four hens. They grew up together and never fight only standing by to take turns with the hens but, from past experience if i take one out and put him back in the other roo will no longer recognize him.

Yes there will be six more hens added soon as they are approaching adulthood so the four will get a small break from the roos.

post #20 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Chicken 

I'm not neutering to prevent reproduction.  I'm neutering to reduce unwanted aggressive behavior and so that I can keep the two roosters together with less fighting.  Otherwise the roosters don't have many options other than death which is not an ethical option for me.


This is coming from a woman who paid $75.00 to have a $8 male pet rat neutered because we rescued a female and did not want babies or for them to be living separately because they are social animals.  So go for it!  I think it is a responsible thing to do for them to have a well cared for and peaceful existence existence together.


Edited by Cetawin - 5/22/08 at 12:50am

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Member of SDWD  RIP My Precious Thor 9/7/09 - 7/14/10 

RIP to the Love of Speckledhen's Life, Zane 2007 - 2012
Life shouldn't be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty, well-preserved body. but rather, to skid in sideways, totally worn out and exhausted while shouting loudly "WOW! What a ride!"

For Sale: http://ladyhawksmenagerie.webs.com/forsale.htm
http://ww...

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