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Neutering Roosters - Page 10

post #91 of 100

I will have to agree with you, not because I want to, I have to.  I would have had this done if it was a safe medical procedure but it is not.  After checking with my vet, who had tried it once on one of his wife's roos & it was not successful.  He said the testes were extremely hard to locate since they are up by the backbone & the surgery took way to long & he lost the rooster.  I then checked with the vet department at OSU, Okla. State University, & was told the same thing.  They do not do it nor do they approve of  the procedure for the same reasons that my vet had told me.....it is very unsuccessful.

 

I would have loved to keep my 5 boys out of a hatch of 7 but that is not possible.  I can't have 6 roos & 4 hens.    I am so attached to them & they are so sweet, so I am trying to find good homes for them.  I have 2 placed.  So I can only hope they will be loved & took care of by someone else as well as I love & take care of them.  And it will probably be a long time, if ever, that I hatch out anymore.

 

In mammals spaying & neutering is essential & neutering males that will never be used for breeding is doing the responsible thing. At well over 1 million dogs who are put to death every year because there are not homes for them people should be responsible not to let this happen.  It does alter aggression in dogs but more importantly it would save the unwanted from being put to death.   It does alter aggression  in horses as all of my performance horses were geldings & I wouldn't have had a stud horse on my place.   

post #92 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by newhamplover View Post

I will have to agree with you, not because I want to, I have to.  I would have had this done if it was a safe medical procedure but it is not.  After checking with my vet, who had tried it once on one of his wife's roos & it was not successful.  He said the testes were extremely hard to locate since they are up by the backbone & the surgery took way to long & he lost the rooster.  I then checked with the vet department at OSU, Okla. State University, & was told the same thing.  They do not do it nor do they approve of  the procedure for the same reasons that my vet had told me.....it is very unsuccessful.

I would have loved to keep my 5 boys out of a hatch of 7 but that is not possible.  I can't have 6 roos & 4 hens.    I am so attached to them & they are so sweet, so I am trying to find good homes for them.  I have 2 placed.  So I can only hope they will be loved & took care of by someone else as well as I love & take care of them.  And it will probably be a long time, if ever, that I hatch out anymore.

In mammals spaying & neutering is essential & neutering males that will never be used for breeding is doing the responsible thing. At well over 1 million dogs who are put to death every year because there are not homes for them people should be responsible not to let this happen.  It does alter aggression in dogs but more importantly it would save the unwanted from being put to death.   It does alter aggression  in horses as all of my performance horses were geldings & I wouldn't have had a stud horse on my place.   
1 million dogs being put to death because they don't have homes is a people problem not dog. Most people who actually do spay and neuter their pets don't let them run free to breed anyway. It's a feel good measure that does nothing to stop the problem of irresponsible owners.
Besides the fact that neutering doesn't always stop aggression there are plenty of other negative side affects. Imo for males the pros do not outweigh the cons.
Edited by roosterhavoc - 6/29/16 at 9:23pm
post #93 of 100

I stated that spaying & neutering is a responsibility thing.  Owning any animal is a responsibility thing.  I don't know what part of the country you live  but here in the country in Okla. I really can't think of anyone who does have a yard fence, we always have. Of course to keep our own animals in & safe but equally to keep the neighbors animals out.  The majority seem to think that the country is "free roaming rights".  The neighbors that used to live to the east of us, city people & they only lasted 4 years in the country, had horses, donkeys, chickens, rabbits, dogs, cats, a pig, & goats.  They never realized that stuff had to be fed  & watered let alone "fenced in".  I was so tired of their stuff on our property all the time we even ran another property fence over the barbed wire fence.  It helped but still didn't solve the problem.   But they are the rule...not the exception.  So I sure don't agree that "most" people who do not spay or neuter don't let their animals run free & even if they don't all of the neighbors animals trying to get in your yard to breed your animals.

post #94 of 100

My rooster is damaging 4 of 8 hens, to the point that their wingjoints are bald and reddened. Also, their backs are getting bald too.

 

 I can stand the crowing, but the damage is just awful. I have made little capes/aprons for the girls, but the wingjoints are still exposed and get damaged.

 

So, wondering if he get neutered, will he still go through the motions of mating?  anyone know?

 

I have sanded down his spurs , but his feet are so big, and he weighs quite a bit. 

post #95 of 100

Where is your vet? I just called all the vet around here and nobody does it - I'm in NH

post #96 of 100

I was thinking of doing the same, however since they will still crow, I found another option.

It's a collar that keeps the rooster from being able to crow loudly and usually cuts done the crowing by 50%.

I am just starting the fitting process with my Rooster Bob, he is now about 6 months old and just started trying out his lungs. 

I don't want to put him on craigs list, etc because he may just be butchered and he is a very nice rooster. 

I will collect eggs every morning and afternoon as usual to keep them from starting the incubation process.

My hens are louder than he is so I don't think I'll have a problem keeping him as I don't want chicks either.

 

http://www.mypetchicken.com/catalog/No-Crow-Rooster-Collar-c89.aspx

 

You may also want to read this article about how eggs develop, it is very interesting.

 

http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/search?q=how+eggs+develop

 

Good luck, I hope this info helps. I'm a vet tech and people spay and neuter all sorts of "cheap" pets as some people call rats, hamsters, bunnies and such.

 

This video is Bob (was Sweet Pea) trying out his lungs, this is before using the anti-crow collar.

 

post #97 of 100
I got the collar, it didn't work for my rooster, he was still as loud, but for a while it cut the number of times he was crowing. After he got used to it, he went back to his habit. I tightened it until it couldn't get any tighter, was afraid I was going to strangle him. Lucky someone at work lives in a rural area and has 10 chickens, he was happy to take my rooster. So happy ending for him, glad he has a good home now.

Good lick with the collar, maybe I bought the wrong size? (Large)...hmm.png
post #98 of 100

I'm hoping to get mine rehomed also, he's a very nice rooster.

It's hard to find anyone in my area that want them though.

Happy things worked out for your guy!

:cd

post #99 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by mickchick View Post

For those that are interested, here is what the Vet from the Cornell Exotic Animal Hospital had to say.

Cost - $400 to $500

Surgery is very difficult and painful even for very young birds (less than 1 mo old)... now that he has reached sexual maturity (he is 4 mos) his testicles are large and difficult to remove though it can be done.  There are no guarantees that he will return to his gentle ways since he has already learned how to be a rooster.

And, we would need to wait until the breeding season is over because his testicles are very large during this time...  which just means he will have more time to learn the rooster way.

We are not doing it.... we will find him a happy home where he can have his way with lots of girls.  Hate to see him go - but what else can you do other than eat him:-( 
post #100 of 100
Wow I just had it done from a vet who owns and has slaughtered many chickens . Nicest guy in the world. His first time doing it too! 'My roo is 6 'months old so far he's doing ok it's only been 24 hours . He only charged me $50! Inc anti biotics
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