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Can Dogs Have Oreos? - Page 3

post #21 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickyLove 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyChickenLady 

From what I have learned, it's DARK chocolate that's bad for dogs. And I've also heard 7 grapes can kill them LoL very random what WE. They can have milk chocolate in moderation. I've actually found (and hope to find again) doggie brownie treats - chocolate made especially for dogs smile I actually think I found them at TSC or Wal-mart.


Feeding dogs grapes can actually cause kidney damage and renal failure. I'm glad you mentioned this! I have a friend who insists that "raisins aren't the same thing!" fact is, BOTH contain toxins that are not safe for our canine friends.


A raisin is just a dried out grape so I agree, it IS the same thing!

The littlest chicken wrangler in the Northeast
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post #22 of 71

Our neighbors had a Beagle who ate ONE Oreo, was rushed to the vet, and still died from chocolate toxicity.  So nope, I will NEVER give chocolate in any form to a dog.  I know some dogs do fine with chocolate in low amounts and some are never sick.  I know the Beagle was a rare case.  But none the less, I saw it once, saw the dog in the vets office and watched the dog go further and further down hill.

If I can't be a good example, I'll just have to be a horrible warning.
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post #23 of 71
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the replies. I have never given any of our dogs chocolate or grapes, but I must say I have never heard about the turkey skin. It surprised me that people where saying to give them oreos, so I thought it would be best to ask first. I guess there is more for me big_smile

Thanks


 
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Chickens are like potato chips
     You can't have just one 
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post #24 of 71

I'm not sure on the turkey skin issue.  Ours have had it before in very limited amounts.  I think it's pretty fatty, usually - or at least the bits the dogs get are.  Which thus leads towards panceitis (sp?) with all the other "treats" the dogs usually get around turkey time.

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post #25 of 71

I also heard on publis radio that dogs aren't supposed to eat pure cocoa.. 75% and up. My pound puppy was about 55# when we got him and he ate a whole bag of Andes candy plus a box of homemade candy we got for Christmas. He just got sick all over his kennel. I'm sure you wouldn't use oreos as its main diet,but as a treat sparingly It won't hurt it. Besides, that is probably a giant of a dog. It won't hurt him/her.

post #26 of 71

Someone never told my Cocker Spaniel that chocolate was bad. One christmas he ate a Chocolate Pecan Pie and 2 lbs of Fudge. Called the vet, we gave him Benadryl for about 4 days and other than some runs, he was fine. In fact he lived another 12 years after that......

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post #27 of 71

dogs should not have anything with chocolate in it because chocolate is really bad for dogs

post #28 of 71

Apart from the turkey skin being too fatty and causes pancreatitis, It also contains tryptophan which builds up in the liver or kidneys (I forget which) same thing with grapes and chocolate.....it builds up over a period of time and then.....poof   very sick or dead dog or cat.  Cooking the turkey skin changes it's chemical structure so it contains more tryptophan than raw (so I was told) I say...why take chances? There is plenty of other healthy treats to give your dogs.

Something else all pet owners should know is that most Vets don't get nutritional training except from the dog food manufacturers (I used to work for a vet and I asked them)
This is taken directly from a package of Iams dog food     

Chicken By-Product Meal (Natural source of Chondroitin Sulfate and Glucosamine), Corn Meal,


Chicken by-product meal is ground up heads feet feathers etc.
 
From Science diets web site   - ingredients for their adult dog food 

Ground Whole Grain Corn, Chicken By-Product Meal,


A large percentage of dogs are allergic to corn! This food lists corn as the first ingredient (which means it has a whole bunch in it.)

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Dianne
Don't worry about the world coming to an end today.....It is already Tomorrow in Australia
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post #29 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChooksinChoppers 

Something else all pet owners should know is that most Vets don't get nutritional training except from the dog food manufacturers (I used to work for a vet and I asked them)
This is taken directly from a package of Iams dog food     

Chicken By-Product Meal (Natural source of Chondroitin Sulfate and Glucosamine), Corn Meal,


Chicken by-product meal is ground up heads feet feathers etc.
 
From Science diets web site   - ingredients for their adult dog food 

Ground Whole Grain Corn, Chicken By-Product Meal,


A large percentage of dogs are allergic to corn! This food lists corn as the first ingredient (which means it has a whole bunch in it.)



X2!!! I also used to work as a vet tech...

1. Chocolate should NEVER EVER be given to animals. I have seen cats get sick and die from one Hershey's kiss. I've seen dogs get sick and die from 1/2 a candy bar. IT IS A MYTH THAT ONLY THE 75% AND UP CHOCOLATE IS POISONOUS. All chocolate is poisonous, but like people dogs have varying capabilities to handle the toxicity. PLUS even if you feed your dog chocolate and don't SEE any symptoms, that doesn't mean the chocolate isn't affecting the organs. In fact most cats and dogs will not show symptoms of kidney or pancreas failure until the organ is past 60% of non functioning ability.

2. Why would you want to give your dogs something their body was not designed to be fed. Processed simple carbs and sugar and VERY bad for ANY animal to be eating. Including US. And I agree with the above poster about the dog food. Try researching dog food at www.dogfoodproject.com or www.dogfoodanalysis.com.

3. Just as a note since it was mentioned... I have NOT heard about the tryptophan toxicity... The turkey is often cited as the culprit in afterdinner lethargy, but the truth is that you could omit the bird altogether and still feel the effects of the feast. Turkey does contain L-tryptophan, a very large essential amino acid. Animals must take it in through their diet as the body does not produce it on their own. Tryptophan and 5-HTP have been used to decrease aggression and impulsivity in dogs and cats. They also have both mood stabilizating and calming effects.  L-tryptophan is used in the body to produce the B-vitamin, niacin. Tryptophan also can be metabolized into serotonin and melatonin, neurotransmitters that exert a calming effect and regulates sleep. However, L-tryptophan needs to be taken on an empty stomach and without any other amino acids or protein in order to make you drowsy. There's lots of protein in a serving of turkey and it's probably not the only food on the table. It's worth noting that other foods contain as much or more tryptophan than turkey (0.333 g of tryptophan per 100 gram edible portion), including chicken (0.292 g of tryptophan per 100 gram edible portion), pork, and cheese. As with turkey, other amino acids are present in these foods besides tryptophan.

HOWEVER, fatty "treats" and human food can EASILY lead to Pancreatitis in Dogs, which I have seen a lot of, here is more info on that; 

Canine pancreatitis is usually divided into chronic and acute cases. Symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are milder and are often mistaken for other illnesses. While chronic pancreatitis in dogs is the milder form of the two, it's a continuing inflammatory disease that's often accompanied by slow, irreversible damage. Acute pancreatitis is usually more severe, but when it's over, there's no remaining damage to organs. So basically, canine pancreatitis can be acute and only occur once in a dog's lifetime or it can become chronic and keep returning over and over again. It can be a rapidly life threatening illness or a mild attack of pain that resolves in a few hours or a day or so. There's another very severe form of this condition called necrotizing pancreatitis, in which the damage is so severe that portions of the pancreas are actually destroyed. Some authors refer to this as hemorrhagic pancreatitis. This form of pancreatitis in dogs can be fatal and requires early intervention and aggressive treatment.

Causes of Pancreatitis in Dogs;

In a large number of cases, the cause of pancreatitis in dogs remains unclear. However, there are certain things that we know are associated with the disease.

The most important factor is what your dog eats.

Dogs with diets high in fat, and dogs who have recently gotten into the trash or have been fed greasy table scraps, seem to have a higher incidence of the disease.

A single high fat meal can cause canine pancreatitis in a dog whose normal diet is moderate or low in fat.

That's why there's a rash of pancreatitis cases at vet clinics around Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter every year. People just can't resist sharing their high fat leftovers with the family dog.

Some other factors contributing to the development of pancreatitis in dogs include:
Obesity
Trauma
Liver disease
Lack of exercise
Certain medications
Cushing's disease
Chronic kidney disease
Recent abdominal surgery
Blood clotting disorders
Long-term use of corticosteroids
High calcium levels in the blood
High triglyceride and/or cholesterol levels in the blood

Hope this was informative!


Edited by WhiteMountainsRanch - 8/29/11 at 12:51pm
post #30 of 71

My vet works with pets, livestock and zoo animals, one of the best ones around in Mid Central......I normally don't argue with him. Vet techs don't have the rigourous testings, up to date information and thousands of people have been feeding their dogs chocolate. Its like Adam's flea stuff or Sargeant flea stuff, that killed alot of animals...right up there with Hartz products.  Collies are more prone to heartguard pills.

Feeding chocolate has their own risks and the owners would be informed of the risk and it is up to them to make their judgement on how much chocolate to feed their animals. Eventually it would kill the pets or it never did harm them. My hubby's mom feeds her Poodles chocolate kisses and they never did suffer any ill effects which at that time I told her chocolate will kill them...well, it didn't harm them, lived to be OLD. Some dogs have a sensitivity to chocolates more than others.

Common sense prevails...before you know it, in five or ten years, the next thing you will know something we were told it was harmful was not really harmful, its another chemical ingredients that is killing them and so on.

Would I feed my dogs chocolate? No, but if they accidently got into one, laxatives and a trip to the vet or call the vet would be the most sensible thing to do.

BYC Member since 4/11/2002 
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