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Frizzle Thread ~ PICS ~~ Must Read Info On Page 4!!! - Page 4

post #31 of 170
Thread Starter 

this is a copy and past thing. read!big_smile








Frizzle
Frizzles are rarely passed by the general public without comment; Is that a real chook or OMG theyve permed the poor thing! are likely reactions but there is more to Frizzles than meets the eye.


Breed: Frizzle
Origin: Asia and Africa
Colours: Black, Blue, Buff, or White, a pure even shade throughout in the self-coloured. Brown-Red, Partridge, Cuckoo and many other OEG colours are recognised, along with Red (as per Rhode Island Red) and Columbian (as per Wyandottes). Beak and leg colour is to correspond with plumage; yellow in Buff, Columbian, Pile, Red and White varieties. White in Spangle, Black-Red and Cuckoo. Dark willow, black or blue in other varieties. Variation is leg colour occurs, and Blacks are often seen with yellow legs.
Eggs: tinted to white in colour, although really depends on the strain. Frizzles have caught a bad name as layers go, and even though theyre an exhibition breed, they are good layers and excellent broodies despite the rumours.
Comment: Frizzles may become ragged looking as the end of the season wears on, their plumage is often quite brittle and will snap or fray if the perches are too high, males are mating vigorously or because of their environment. Generally they make great pets for children and even the males will allow you to pat them and will eat out of your hand. One thing that exhibitors of Frizzles see as constant battle is the knockers; some people regard Frizzles as crossbreds or feather dusters, and dismiss them without further comment. This is often due to frizzled crossbred birds being sold or shown as Frizzles, for example a Silkie, Pekin or Belgian frizzled bird is not a Frizzle, just a frizzled crossbred. And although these may appeal to backyarders and are very attractive, the only frizzled breeds recognised in Australia are Polish and Japanese (along with the breed, the Frizzle).

Cost: Frizzles can range in price depending on quality and age. They can range from $5-$30ea for pet quality, and $25-$100ea (or more) for show specimens.
History: Frizzles are believed to have originated in Asia, although little is known about the exact place. Charles Darwin first discovered them and classed them as Frizzled or Caffie fowl, he discovered the bantams and they are still more popular today than their large counterparts.

Exhibition:
Frizzles rarely win at poultry shows, due to their rare stature and difficulty to breed a perfect bird. Having said that, many judges are very fair and put up Frizzles for sectional awards or higher, its just with a lot of rare breeds, some judges feel pressured by breeds like Australorps or OEG that are known winners and often award a more common breed.
Weights for Frizzles are:
FOWLS
Male 3.20 3.60 kg (7 8 lb)
Female 2.25 2.70 kg (5 6 lb)
BANTAMS
Male 960 1075 g (34 38 oz)
Female 790 910 g (28 32 oz)

A good Frizzle is an eye-catching bird, and a flock of well curled, evenly coloured Frizzles in a pen or on a green lawn is spectacular.


Suitability:
Despite their fragile appearance Frizzles are pretty tough when it comes to wet and cold whether, but stay cleaner and happier in a dry pen. Frizzles are great for pets as they are soft, and lovely natured, and their back-to-front feathers often fascinate kids. To avoid plumage breaking and birds roosting on the ground, perches shouldnt be too high, and although they can fly, its not as well as they think, and may injure themselves flying up to roost.


Selecting birds:
When purchasing birds, take the time to handle each bird and thoroughly run over each bird.
What you should be looking for is nice broad, soft plumage. Well curled for exhibition birds* with the tips of the feathers ideally pointing at their base. Plumage takes up 25 points (one ¼) of the standard so obviously a very important feature. Size is also important as some Frizzles sold are often too big for bantams, or too small for large, a result of a cross usually. Earlobes should be red, legs free from feathers or stubs, no tufts or top knots and not of a Light Breed type.
Type is ideally a well-balanced fowl, nothing type wise is exaggerated on a Frizzle. Legs should be medium length, but still showing when a bird is standing, and shouldnt be so short the feathers touch the ground. Tails need to be medium or short, and not carried too high, wings should be tucked up neatly but sometimes they appear loose because of the feathers curl. Colour is also worth 25 points so a uniform recognised colour is a must.
*Read below about breeding frizzling.

Breeding:
Frizzles are not always frizzled, which is very important to remember. When 2 exhibition Frizzles are mated 25% will be smooth feathered fowl, 50% frizzled (of varying quality), and 25% will be extremely frizzled.
Smooth feathered birds are very important in the breeding pen as they will often soften and broaden the feathers within a line after years of Frizzle-to-Frizzle matings. This is often a problem when the flights, and wing feathers become brittle, a smooth feathered, Frizzle-bred male or female will usually fix the problem.
It should be remembered that a Frizzle (the breed) MUST have clean legs (no feathers), single comb, red lobe and be of a heavy breed type.

Extremely frizzled birds have many names; Wispies, Double-curleds, Extremes, Wireys, etc. They are usually, to say the least schizophrenic! Especially males. They are birds that are born extreme, both in the curl of their feathers and their nature. Most males seem to be nervous and usually small. This year (2009) is the first year i am keeping 3 F/F pullets, as they have proved themselves as more calm and collected birds, although i know breeders who always keep a pen of F/F females and an f/f male (smooth male) to produce 100% F/f exhibition Frizzles.

Feeding:
Frizzles eat as per normal fowl, and are great foragers. They should be fed a variety of grains plus layer pellets and grit to keep them from becoming bored with pelleted food. Greens provide stress relief, entertainment and great health.

An interesting note is that frizzling has been introduced to broiler chickens to help overcome heat stress.



WEBSITES TO DO WITH FRIZZLES:

http://www.thefrizzlesocietyofgreatbritain.co.uk/index.php?    The Frizzle Society of Great Britains homepage, with the complete standard for British and Australian birds, photos, and news etc.

http://www.feathersite.com/Poultry/CGD/Friz/BRKFrizzles.html   an American site so many Frizzled Cochins, but also some good photos and further links.

http://web.archive.org/web/20030602183800/www.webcom.com/777/nfcoa.html    National Frizzle Club of America website.

http://gallery.backyardpoultry.com//showgallery.php?cat=519   Backyard Poultry Frizzle photo section

http://www.pekincorner.co.uk/   A UK breeder of Pekins and Frizzle Bantams


Edited by silky_3699 - 9/20/11 at 12:05am

Some Best Buds are ray's two cents, DuckLover2399, guinea fowl galore & Christie Loves Silkies!
            My RP My RP Empire's of Salendia   Follow me on Twitter: @Silkie_breeder
I am Homeschooled!I AM FROM AUSTRALIA!!! 

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Some Best Buds are ray's two cents, DuckLover2399, guinea fowl galore & Christie Loves Silkies!
            My RP My RP Empire's of Salendia   Follow me on Twitter: @Silkie_breeder
I am Homeschooled!I AM FROM AUSTRALIA!!! 

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post #32 of 170

Umm, that info I believe is only referring to the common Cochin type and Cochin cross frizzles. wink You see, back in the day, frizzles used to be a breed and were shown separately, but now, frizzle is the term for the feather type, and as shown with my bird, can be found on a number of breeds still true to type but for the feathers and can lay a number of egg colors.

Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

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Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

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post #33 of 170

what if you  breed a normal feathered  that came from a frizzled mom and normal feathered dad to a normal feathered bird. will you only get normal feathered chicks? I know it's a dominate gene but I have heard of those breeding normal to normal and getting frizzled.

If you love your chicken, thank a breeder. NPIP tested

 

visit the Maine Chicken Stocks swaps and shows thread to see what's going on in your part of Maine

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/maine-chicken-swaps-stocks-and-shows-2014

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If you love your chicken, thank a breeder. NPIP tested

 

visit the Maine Chicken Stocks swaps and shows thread to see what's going on in your part of Maine

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/maine-chicken-swaps-stocks-and-shows-2014

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post #34 of 170

You should get normal feathered ones. Frizzling is carrying only one frizzled allele, just like blue or tufted, a non-frizzled has no frizzled genes. If someone crossed two normals and got a frizzled, perhaps they just aren't aware that they have a frizzled but not quite as drastic as most? After all, I've seen a Polish cockerel with frizzling so amazing his crest had curly Q's. So, it might vary.

Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

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Araucanas, Polish, Shamos, Olive Eggers, and a handful of Finn Sheep, Wensleydale Sheep, Gotland Sheep, Kinder Goats, a Yak, and various rare breed Turkeys, Ducks, and Pigs.

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post #35 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Illia 

You should get normal feathered ones. Frizzling is carrying only one frizzled allele, just like blue or tufted, a non-frizzled has no frizzled genes. If someone crossed two normals and got a frizzled, perhaps they just aren't aware that they have a frizzled but not quite as drastic as most? After all, I've seen a Polish cockerel with frizzling so amazing his crest had curly Q's. So, it might vary.


I have some babies that have almost kinky feathering (silkie feathered) and as tiny babies they were curled then lost it. so geneticly they are frizzled, correct?

If you love your chicken, thank a breeder. NPIP tested

 

visit the Maine Chicken Stocks swaps and shows thread to see what's going on in your part of Maine

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/maine-chicken-swaps-stocks-and-shows-2014

Reply

If you love your chicken, thank a breeder. NPIP tested

 

visit the Maine Chicken Stocks swaps and shows thread to see what's going on in your part of Maine

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/maine-chicken-swaps-stocks-and-shows-2014

Reply
post #36 of 170

I want to thank everyone for all the advice and/or facts.  It was greatly appreciated.  smile

So far Lady Gaga, my frizzle-feathered bantam Cochin (white in color BTW) has hatched two out of three of her eggs.wee  .  She started out with four eggs and a golf ball, but one week in an egg was broken; not sure how.  The golf ball has since been removed so Lady Gaga will get off the nest eventually . The papa, Jay-Z,  is a smooth feathered black bantam Cochin.  They are actually from the same momma who was a black frizzle.  Their papa was a black smooth feathered Cochin.   They are about 18 months old and usually free range.

I moved Lady Gaga to a private area with her babies.  Jay-Z just hangs around, never going farther than ten feet away or so.  They are my only chickens.  The twenty-one day mark will be in two days for the last egg.  I am worried about the first two though.  She is not letting them out of the nest to eat or drink.  I took them out once and put their beaks in the water and they both drank but Lady Gaga immediately put them back.  Should I just leave them alone?  What can I expect now? hu Thanks ahead of time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27rino6N7To    <<<<-------------- Video of my chickens.
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27rino6N7To    <<<<-------------- Video of my chickens.
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post #37 of 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoppy 

what if you  breed a normal feathered  that came from a frizzled mom and normal feathered dad to a normal feathered bird. will you only get normal feathered chicks? I know it's a dominate gene but I have heard of those breeding normal to normal and getting frizzled.


don't know anything about the specifics of frizzle genes, but if frizzle is a dominant gene, then if the bird contains either 1 or 2 copies of the gene, it will exhibit frizzle characteristics... this is because dominant genes override the expression of the normal gene.  of course, this simplest case is true only if it's a single gene creating the frizzle effect.

so if you have a non-frizzle (normal bird) it can only have two normal genes and no frizzle genes.

breeding would, theoretically, work like this:

Normal parent (nn) x frizzle parent (Fn - one frizzle gene)
50% nn - normal, no frizzle chicks
50% nF - frizzle chicks

Normal parent (nn) x frizzle parent (FF - both copies are frizzle)
100% frizzle (nF) chicks


for frizzle x frizle crosses it would work like this:

Frizzle parent (Fn) x frizzle parent (Fn)
25% FF frizzle chicks
25% nn normal chicks
50% Fn frizzle chicks

Frizzle parent (FF) x frizzle parent (Fn)
50% FF frizzle chicks
50% Fn frizzle chicks

Frizzle parent (FF) x frizzle parent (FF)
100% FF frizzle chicks

to get a frizzle chick from normal (non frizzled) parents, you'd have to have a first generation mutation of the gene in the chick.  thiis is rare, but could occasionally happen.

the percentates above are theoretical because there might be other factors, modifying genes, or environmental conditions which might affect the viability of one genetic combination or another, and result in skewing the numbers.

isn't science fun?  hehee!

----------
chickens, geese, turkeys, ducks, guineas, sheep, goats, draft and light horses, cats, herding dogs, livestock guard dogs, bees, mealies... (what, no cows? no llamas?), a very cool hubby who takes it all in stride and builds what they need.
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chickens, geese, turkeys, ducks, guineas, sheep, goats, draft and light horses, cats, herding dogs, livestock guard dogs, bees, mealies... (what, no cows? no llamas?), a very cool hubby who takes it all in stride and builds what they need.
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post #38 of 170

I believe as far as genetics go, frizzled birds have to have one dominant and one recessive gene(Ff) to have the desired frizzled effect on the feathers. If the bird has to dominant genes(FF), they become known as frazzles. So if the bird has two recessive genes(ff) it is a smooth. And if you breed a frizzled bird to a smooth you will get some percentage of frizzles no matter that one of the parents carries the gene for frizzling or not. It is just prefered when breeding frizzles to breed with birds that already carry the frizzling gene. And if you were to (in theory) breed a frazzle or curlie to a smooth, you will get 100% frizzled birds. But I have tryed this and it isnt true, not in my case anyhow.

And as far as frizzles, it itself here in the US is not considered a breed itself. Any breed of chicken can be frizzled, as well as any pattern. Here in the US a frizzle is referenced to the feathers, not the breed itself. And frizzles have been recognized here in the US since the very first SOP was published, in the exact same way that it states today. But in Europe and Australia frizzles are considered a breed in itself. And if not mistaken, they as well have been one of the first recognized breeds in those countries.


~Casey

~When I count my blessings, I always make sure and count each chicken twice.~

 

Buff & White Cochin Bantams; frizzle/smooth

Project Black Tailed Red; frizzle/smooth

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~When I count my blessings, I always make sure and count each chicken twice.~

 

Buff & White Cochin Bantams; frizzle/smooth

Project Black Tailed Red; frizzle/smooth

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post #39 of 170

http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/93695_img_1244.jpg
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/93695_img_1264.jpg
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/93695_img_1267.jpg
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/93695_img_1265.jpg
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/93695_img_1260.jpg
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/93695_img_1245.jpg
A few of my babies.

I live with my partner and our daughter in the foothills of NC. We LOVE our critters!
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I live with my partner and our daughter in the foothills of NC. We LOVE our critters!
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post #40 of 170

Brandy Dandy New to Me beautiful lil Frizzle Cochin Bantam! She is very chatty!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/92508_dscn5254.jpg

The Neighbors call me the Crazy Chicken Lady.
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The Neighbors call me the Crazy Chicken Lady.
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