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Corn stalks for Rabbits - Page 2

post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dewey 

Lookie what I found, a pic of something planted in bag: http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/4396/try-soil-bag-planting-for-no-dig-beds

That
plant's kinda big since it's a mater, but I bet you can find lots of pics online.  I started planting in bags over 30 years ago...at first with regular bags of soil upright, then later discovered that laying the "boxed" bags flat so the soil is shallow works as well while providing more surface area to plant in.  My peeps laugh at my garden of bags since we have many hundreds of acres that we raise alfalfa...meh, they laugh & I'm a good tease taker, but they love to eat from what grows in them bags. big_smile


OHHHHH

This makes since to me now. I was picturing upright. And for some reason I recognize the bag better too. LOL

That is so doable!

OMG, now what else can I plant. LOL  Still time for green onions for the kitchen. hehe

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post #12 of 23

A funeral instead of an anniversary celebration.  hugs  You've been through so much.

And thank you, and yes, insomnia must be to blame for the power surges, lol.

For my sister it was 15 days shy of the 1st anniversary if I counted right.  That was several years ago and my sis never recovered.  I take care of her to this day.  I'm the baby in the family but always have taken care of all of my family.  (My sibs are almost 15 years older than I am, except my dorkie bro lol that I love beyond measure and have always taken care of...he's just a couple of years older than me and a really great guy.)  Understandably my sis wasn't able to function at that time so I took care of everything.  Still can't talk about it even to close family.  Less than 6 months later my mamma died, then about 3 months after that I was diagnosed with a few different types of cancer.  When it rains it pours. lol  We all carry on as best we can. thumbsup

I sure hope this thread survives!LOL

Your GB's sound adorable.  If at all possible, yes, wait til you have your little helpers.  That's so precious and something they will they cherish years from now.  My GB's love that grandma loves to play outside & lets them get all dirty in gardens & with fishing, etc....my kids should know better than to think anything less...they were raised the same...I always told them that skin is wash & wear so have a blast.  If my kids weren't really messy after being outside I'd take their temp. big_smile

OK, now that'd be really cool if you add pics and if others do, too.  Nothing makes "ugly yard" into fantastic yard like a garden growing.  Oh, and if there's weeds where you might place the bags, I used to put down some cardboard that extended a bit away from the sides of the bags...keeps weeds from growing right up next to them...but that might lead into the thought of layered gardening. cool

Oh, and duck weed here is available from backyard aquatic growers, as one source.  It can be purchased but many will give it away.

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolftracks 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dewey 

Lookie what I found, a pic of something planted in bag: http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/4396/try-soil-bag-planting-for-no-dig-beds

That
plant's kinda big since it's a mater, but I bet you can find lots of pics online.  I started planting in bags over 30 years ago...at first with regular bags of soil upright, then later discovered that laying the "boxed" bags flat so the soil is shallow works as well while providing more surface area to plant in.  My peeps laugh at my garden of bags since we have many hundreds of acres that we raise alfalfa...meh, they laugh & I'm a good tease taker, but they love to eat from what grows in them bags. big_smile


OHHHHH

This makes since to me now. I was picturing upright. And for some reason I recognize the bag better too. LOL

That is so doable!

OMG, now what else can I plant. LOL  Still time for green onions for the kitchen. hehe


LOL, I know, huh?  Just be sure it's garden soil and not topsoil or mulch!  haha

Years ago I did that upright thing and it's a waste of space.  Some will say you need 12-18" of soil....not so for most veggies.  Oooh, one thing to watch for in any type of "container" garden is knats...gotta go easy on the water with the bags especially when getting seeds to sprout (I also punch hole in the sides with a screwdriver).

post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 

I've done lots of container gardening over the years. Wood have been so nice to throw some boards and bags of soil out and grown that way, but I've always had a garden, just never got the chance here. I haven't tried growing much other than herbs in winter though.

Oh and I have chard seeds. Don't know why I do, but I do, so that was a surprise.

I need to find some really cheap plastic and see what I can rig up. Won't be fancy or anything people who know me would except, but I guess priorities really do change sometimes.

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post #15 of 23

My suggestion is that if you are going to feed home grown, that you plant a large variety of things for the rabbits.

My biggest success has been snow peas.  My family eats most of the pea pods (stir fry) and the ducks, geese, and rabbits get the plants. 

The plant grows well and quickly.  It is tender, and it has a good high protein content.  On top of that, everybody really loves it. So it's a winner all the way around.

I think that if you were careful, you could dry the pea plants.  They make hay out of field pea plants for cattle, so dried pea plants have a history as winter feed. 

If you have room, you can grow sunflowers.  I don't think the rabbits will eat the plant, but the seeds are very nutritious and easy to grow.  Once dried, the seeds seem to last for years.

Any of the winter squash and pumpkins can be stored fresh well into winter.  Not a complete diet, but they are something that rabbits will eat.

My rabbits are eating the green leafs of the corn.  I don't know how they'd feel about dried cord stalks.  My corn plants will all be eaten as they come out of the ground still green.

If you take plants from someone else, be sure to ask if the plants have been sprayed with anything.


Edited by Oregon Blues - 10/3/11 at 9:59am

Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

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Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

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post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregon Blues 

My suggestion is that if you are going to feed home grown, that you plant a large variety of things for the rabbits.

My biggest success has been snow peas.  My family eats most of the pea pods (stir fry) and the ducks, geese, and rabbits get the plants. 

The plant grows well and quickly.  It is tender, and it has a good high protein content.  On top of that, everybody really loves it. So it's a winner all the way around.

I think that if you were careful, you could dry the pea plants.  They make hay out of field pea plants for cattle, so dried pea plants have a history as winter feed. 

If you have room, you can grow sunflowers.  I don't think the rabbits will eat the plant, but the seeds are very nutritious and easy to grow.  Once dried, the seeds seem to last for years.

Any of the winter squash and pumpkins can be stored fresh well into winter.  Not a complete diet, but they are something that rabbits will eat.

My rabbits are eating the green leafs of the corn.  I don't know how they'd feel about dried cord stalks.  My corn plants will all be eaten as they come out of the ground still green.

If you take plants from someone else, be sure to ask if the plants have been sprayed with anything.


I was thinking peas. Snow peas are so much better. Guess I'll grow both.

Sunflowers are a given. I'm planting them down on side of the yard. It's a 4ft cyclone and the only one that takes away from privacy, so I'm trying to come up with things that grow high and cover as well as things that can be used for the animals.

I thought I was actually too late for for winter sqash and pumkins, but f I'm going to cover them, I'll make sure I add both.

They like the corn stalks. Not exactly going crazy over them, but I figure it's someone for them to chew on too and they are nawing on them.

They neighbors haven't sprayed. They are using mostly organic things and since the corn was for their family, they were pretty careful.

I can still use more ideas. I want to see if broccoli and cauliflower will work under the plastic. Hope so, those are the most eatten veggies in this house.

Don't know how well it will work, but I'm planting tomatoes in buckets as well as the raised beds. I'll try wrapping them in plastic.

Thanks for the suggestions, keep em coming. Late start, but hopefully I still have a nack with plants after a year and a half of rarely seeing on, much less growing any.

Any other ideas from out there????

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post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 

Oh looky what I found!

http://www.cityfarmer.org/coldframe.html#coldframe

I'll have to find freebie stuff for them, but I can do these later on too.

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post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 

This was helpful too

163 Things You Can Compost
http://www.plantea.com/compost-materials.htm

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post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolftracks 

Oh looky what I found!

http://www.cityfarmer.org/coldframe.html#coldframe

I'll have to find freebie stuff for them, but I can do these later on too.


Built-out cold frames are nice. 

Also, the clear "rubbermaid-type" storage tubs, lid side down, can be used as cheap, instant cold frames.  Homedepot has them on sale for about $6 several times a year.  I used to sow seeds directly in the dirt then put removable row covers made of clear plastic sheeting over the rows/beds...mini greenhouses!  Those work great here and I used them a lot.  Plastic jugs with the bottoms cut off are a basic mimi-me form of those.

Hopefully you can find a local to you planting guide that'll list lots of veggies & crops for you to choose from. 

Pasted from a local to me planting guide (in the subtropical desert)....
*October: plant artichokes, beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, garlic, lettuce, peas, radishes 
*November: artichokes, beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, peas, radishes 
*December: artichokes, beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, peas, radishes 
*January: bare roots asparagus and strawberries, cabbage, carrots, lettuce, potatoes, radishes 
*February: beets, bush beans, cantaloupe, carrots, corn, eggplant, lettuce, peppers, potatoes, radishes, summer squash, tomatoes, watermelon

Row covers greatly extend (and jump start!) seasons. wee


Edited by dewey - 10/4/11 at 6:46am
post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 

So far I can plant
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Kale
Lettuce
Spinach

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