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For the new folks that haven't experienced a molt yet. - Page 5

post #41 of 329
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by centrarchid 

It would be nice to have a series of photographs showing progression of molting cycle, especially where it is taken place at the usual rate.  I am developing one on progression of feather sets in young wild-type chickens showing three feather sets before adulthood.  Progression will include second adult feather set which is distinguishable from first in at least some breeds.  I will not have same for more typical production breeds and they do progress differently, especially in respect to how flight feathers are replaced.  Suggestions relating to molting cycle and nutrition that have long been a concern amoung game chicken folks could also be addressed.  Such an effort might be worthy of a sticky status since molt questions are so frequent.


My production red lost all of her flight feathers except the outer 3 on each wing.  They are growing back in now (about 1/2 way in) and she hasn't yet lost the outer 3.

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.

I have zero chicken willpower.

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Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.

I have zero chicken willpower.

Reply
post #42 of 329
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedDrgn 

OMG, that poor chicken! ep

If a chicken has a rough molt like that and it's in a colder climate, how much of an issue can thermoregulation become?  If that was one of my hens right now, I'd feel obligated to get her a sweater and some fuzzy socks because it's been darn cold at night. :o


X2!!

*~*~*Marcy*~*~*~*
Owned by a senior citizen Chocolate Lab lady, two Rhode Island Reds, two Columbian Rocks, and four Barred Rocks. Married to my best friend for 37 yrs, three grown kids, two grandkids. Loving life!  "And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." - A. Lincoln
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*~*~*Marcy*~*~*~*
Owned by a senior citizen Chocolate Lab lady, two Rhode Island Reds, two Columbian Rocks, and four Barred Rocks. Married to my best friend for 37 yrs, three grown kids, two grandkids. Loving life!  "And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." - A. Lincoln
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post #43 of 329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Chooks 
Quote:
Originally Posted by centrarchid 

It would be nice to have a series of photographs showing progression of molting cycle, especially where it is taken place at the usual rate.  I am developing one on progression of feather sets in young wild-type chickens showing three feather sets before adulthood.  Progression will include second adult feather set which is distinguishable from first in at least some breeds.  I will not have same for more typical production breeds and they do progress differently, especially in respect to how flight feathers are replaced.  Suggestions relating to molting cycle and nutrition that have long been a concern amoung game chicken folks could also be addressed.  Such an effort might be worthy of a sticky status since molt questions are so frequent.


My production red lost all of her flight feathers except the outer 3 on each wing.  They are growing back in now (about 1/2 way in) and she hasn't yet lost the outer 3.


That sounds like the rapid replacement pattern typical of production breeds where progression goes in step of three on wing flight feathers.  My games and red jungle fowl replace feathers singly over a much longer stretch of time.  The rapid feather change I think is more demanding on birds in respect to protein requirements during feather replacement.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #44 of 329
Thread Starter 

Even though she's still growing in some hackle feathers, her comb is brightening up and looking less shriveled now.  Eggs coming again soon! woot

http://i822.photobucket.com/albums/zz145/new2chooks/IMG_4532.jpg

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.

I have zero chicken willpower.

Reply

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.

I have zero chicken willpower.

Reply
post #45 of 329

She's a pretty girl.  She looked really pitiful in the middle of molting!  Thanks for this thread, it may save me a freak-out someday! smile

post #46 of 329

Thank you so, so much for starting this thread! I would have had a heart attack had I seen this in one (or more) of my girls. I am aware of the molt, but was unaware that it could get that bad! I probably would have had that chicken sleeping in the house with me, so I could keep an eye on her. And also as with one of the posts above, would definitely be putting little sweaters and booty's on her. Thankfully mine all love to be handled. Still may do that for my girls especially if they molt during the winter. They are still pullets yet, so I have a bit of a wait.

I wonder if anyone else has ever tried doing the chicken booty thing?! I know it sounds silly, but my girls REALLY hate to have cold feet. They walk around picking up and shaking their feet (like a cat does) for awhile when they first come out of the coop in the morning and usually after their naps. Also sweaters?! I'm a crafter, and was wondering for one, my own chickens, and two, whether there was a market for such a thing? Thanks in advance!

Kitty

Proud Animal Mama of 2 pups (a Chi/Rat Terrier Mix & a Chug); 2 Tabby Cats & 1 Feral Kitten; 2 Cockatiels; 15 Hens (5 Ameraucana's, 4 Golden Sex Links, 4 Buff Orpingtons, 1 Buff Laced Polish & 1 Blue Orpington), 2 Unknown Bantam Chicks, 1 Blue Orpington Rooster; 8 Chinese Brown/Swan Geese (2 Gander & 6 Geese); 2 Peahens & 1 Peacock, 1 Quarter Horse Gelding & 1 Morab Horse Gelding
http://www.hock...

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Proud Animal Mama of 2 pups (a Chi/Rat Terrier Mix & a Chug); 2 Tabby Cats & 1 Feral Kitten; 2 Cockatiels; 15 Hens (5 Ameraucana's, 4 Golden Sex Links, 4 Buff Orpingtons, 1 Buff Laced Polish & 1 Blue Orpington), 2 Unknown Bantam Chicks, 1 Blue Orpington Rooster; 8 Chinese Brown/Swan Geese (2 Gander & 6 Geese); 2 Peahens & 1 Peacock, 1 Quarter Horse Gelding & 1 Morab Horse Gelding
http://www.hock...

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post #47 of 329
Thread Starter 

No problem. smile

The first winter I did worry about her being cold as we had a really bad couple of weeks in the 20's at night when she blew her feathers.  I went out to check on her and found her squished between 2 of the fluffiest girls all nice and toasty. lol

Funny, nobody noticed her mega spurs in the first picture. lol  She's one of my original girls when I started with chickens.

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.

I have zero chicken willpower.

Reply

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.

I have zero chicken willpower.

Reply
post #48 of 329

Lol, I didn't notice the spurs, they are scary looking!  My little banty game hen has just lost all the feathers on her head and neck, looks like a turken!

post #49 of 329

funny but sad story about people seeing a molt for the first time. This is our first year of raising chickens so I am very excited about them and I talk about them with my mom. My Mom works as a cashier and has lots of people come through her line and they always chit chat. Well this one lady was talking chickens with her and the lady said that her son had to move home recently and was helping out around the house including feeding, watering a gathering eggs. He noticed one of the chickens looked sick and was losing a lot a feathers so he killed it thinking it was "sick". When his mom came home he told her that he had to kill a chicken because it was sick and he didnt want it getting the other sick too. Poor guy felt so bad when his mom told him that was her best layer and she was molting.

Hi my name is Niki I have 1 awesome Hubby, 2 great boys, 1 brown Beagle, 1 Jack Russell Mix and 5 Speckled Sussex, 2 Welsummers

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Hi my name is Niki I have 1 awesome Hubby, 2 great boys, 1 brown Beagle, 1 Jack Russell Mix and 5 Speckled Sussex, 2 Welsummers

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post #50 of 329

Mine just started to molt last week.  There are not as bad as your girl in the first pic.  How long does it take to them to finish molting?


Edited by hunterblu123 - 12/16/11 at 5:55pm
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