New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

TINY egg

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

This morning when I let the girls out, one nest contained an egg less than an inch long.  It was beautiful and absolutely perfect - no shell weirdness or funky shape.  It seems a little heavy for its size, but it's too darn cute to crack open.  These hens are Black Stars - their normal eggs range from large to jumbo.  I don't know who laid it, but I do have one hen who has had the bald bulging butt problem http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=120841&p=1  though it seems to be easing.  Any ideas what's going on?  They're slowing down on laying a bit (season?), and may be molting - they're not bare but I see more feathers around the past couple of weeks.


Edited by MiddleChild - 10/16/11 at 8:46am
post #2 of 3

Called a fart or wind egg, they happen from time to time.  Nothing to worry about.  Most but not all of these tiny eggs don't contain a yolk, only a white.

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people. 

A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, runner ducks, call ducks, two geese that are my feathered children, and a crossbeak silkie X named Dragon. 

Reply

If there ever comes a day when we can't be together keep me in your heart, I'll stay there forever - Winnie the Pooh
I'll never develop a thick skin.  Thick skin leads to a hard heart and I never want to be one of those people. 

A slave to LF brahmas, seramas, runner ducks, call ducks, two geese that are my feathered children, and a crossbeak silkie X named Dragon. 

Reply
post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 

I heard the "fart egg" from someone around town.  "Pointless egg", maybe.  The weight makes it feel as if it's mostly shell.  I've put it aside and don't intend to open it - maybe set it in silver and make a necklace ...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying