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Wild Turkeys Breeding Domestic Turkeys?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I believe I do have a tom and a hen from my 2 RP mixes. I'm very happy about that! But I'm worried that the wild turkeys that I see here will interfere with breeding.

What would the poult of a wild x domestic turkey be like? Would it act much differently than a domestic breed? Does the wild turkey offer any genetic advantages to the domestic, or vice versa?

Oh I can't wait to have turkey eggs! These 2 turkeys are so friendly; it's amazing!

Loving Life in WV! Mom to 20 Buckeye, 3 Silkies, 2 Polish, 2 Turkeys, 5 dogs, 7 goats, and a llama. Wife to a great husband who puts up with a lot of poop!
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Loving Life in WV! Mom to 20 Buckeye, 3 Silkies, 2 Polish, 2 Turkeys, 5 dogs, 7 goats, and a llama. Wife to a great husband who puts up with a lot of poop!
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post #2 of 9

Try to keep the birds seperate, you don't want the call of the wild to get to your birds. If they were to mate you would probably end up with a ...... wait for it .....TURKEY. It would have 2 wings, legs and one beak. Not sure about much else, sorry. lol

God is good all the time.
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God is good all the time.
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post #3 of 9

About 8 or 10 years ago, when we moved into our new house, with us went a pair of Bronze turkeys..>A bout a week after moving in, our Tom disapeared...and so we were left with a hen.  After two months, the hen also disapeared-- about a month later she reappeared with a string of babies behind her... So either, she carried fertile eggs for over 2 months from the gobbler that disapeared, or she was bred by a eastern wild...

Now, since this time, our bronze birds have lost breast, and feed efficiency (later maturing- but more efficient since we feed them nothing), or course with these two negitives, we've gained so much in natural maternal behavior, egg laying, poult hatching, poult survival, and instinct like athletic ability...

I'm a believer that our hen was in fact bred by an Eastern Wild gobbler, which in the long run saved our Bronze flock.  We've had these birds for over 15 years now, atleast this line, and this spring's hatch I believe is 2 generations away from the wild tom.

I have pictures on the share you turkey pic page, of our next step.. a trio of young bronze birds that we hatch out in May.

Offerring high quality 'Backyard' Cornish hatching eggs for sale, and breeding stock from time to time!  The ultimate backyard meat bird!  Inquire today for a flyer of info!

 

If you want to know my thoughts on:
Cornish: Cornish bantams: Cornish X: or my "ideal" meat bird project-- check out my BYC page.  http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=99923

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Offerring high quality 'Backyard' Cornish hatching eggs for sale, and breeding stock from time to time!  The ultimate backyard meat bird!  Inquire today for a flyer of info!

 

If you want to know my thoughts on:
Cornish: Cornish bantams: Cornish X: or my "ideal" meat bird project-- check out my BYC page.  http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=99923

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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Awesome story!

I would rather my birds not disappear for long periods of time, but I'm glad to know that it can all work out OK if they do. I'm going to try my hardest to keep them here on the property, just in case wink I don't want any accidents! lol

Loving Life in WV! Mom to 20 Buckeye, 3 Silkies, 2 Polish, 2 Turkeys, 5 dogs, 7 goats, and a llama. Wife to a great husband who puts up with a lot of poop!
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Loving Life in WV! Mom to 20 Buckeye, 3 Silkies, 2 Polish, 2 Turkeys, 5 dogs, 7 goats, and a llama. Wife to a great husband who puts up with a lot of poop!
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post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by adoptapitbull 

Awesome story!

I would rather my birds not disappear for long periods of time, but I'm glad to know that it can all work out OK if they do. I'm going to try my hardest to keep them here on the property, just in case wink I don't want any accidents! lol


Almost every time, when a hen disapears, she's setting on eggs...just take a few days of walking around, and we'll find her... either take and build a pen over her, or move her back home...

guineas are the same way, but almost impossible to move. 

Our turkeys have become awesome mothers now, that the wild is in them... This spring, two hens hatched out 12 and 15 poults each.. then one disapeared, and the other one just hatched out 12 more about 3 weeks ago.  During a hens' first year, they'll almost always hatch out b/w 8 and 20 poults, and during the second and later years... they'll hatch two times a year... especially if you steal the babies the first time around after a week or so. 

We plan to keep back 2 young trios from the spring hatch for next year, along with another project pair and trio.

Offerring high quality 'Backyard' Cornish hatching eggs for sale, and breeding stock from time to time!  The ultimate backyard meat bird!  Inquire today for a flyer of info!

 

If you want to know my thoughts on:
Cornish: Cornish bantams: Cornish X: or my "ideal" meat bird project-- check out my BYC page.  http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=99923

Reply

Offerring high quality 'Backyard' Cornish hatching eggs for sale, and breeding stock from time to time!  The ultimate backyard meat bird!  Inquire today for a flyer of info!

 

If you want to know my thoughts on:
Cornish: Cornish bantams: Cornish X: or my "ideal" meat bird project-- check out my BYC page.  http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=99923

Reply
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kfacres 

I have pictures on the share you turkey pic page, of our next step.. a trio of young bronze birds that we hatch out in May.


Where is the turkey pic page? idunno

RIP my son, Michael Bonham, Jr. 1972-2013

A son, brother, friend, wrestler, father, Army Airborne Ranger, wrestling coach, and so much more....

A memorial video with some of his (too short) life HERE.

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RIP my son, Michael Bonham, Jr. 1972-2013

A son, brother, friend, wrestler, father, Army Airborne Ranger, wrestling coach, and so much more....

A memorial video with some of his (too short) life HERE.

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post #7 of 9

I think we, as turkey growers, should make every effort not to let our birds breed with wild birds.  The genetics for behaviour are certainly different, and while some may tolerate the poorer domestication of the cross, it's much worse if the genes in the wild population are diluted with the domestic genes that we bring there.  The wild birds have been selected for the diet available and predator avoidance for a long time.  It doesn't take too much influence from domesticated crossing to damage these traits.  There are excellent examples of this documented for a number of fish species.

We also wouldn't want to introduce any domestic diseases to wild flocks.

Just my 2 cents.

Chickens were fun...until I got turkeys!
Narragansetts, Golden Narragnasetts, Royal Palms, Calico, Standard Bronze, Red Bronze, (and a few BB Bronze..but don't tell anyone!)
Mixed flock of laying hens
Mixed-stock pigs

Two-many horses

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Chickens were fun...until I got turkeys!
Narragansetts, Golden Narragnasetts, Royal Palms, Calico, Standard Bronze, Red Bronze, (and a few BB Bronze..but don't tell anyone!)
Mixed flock of laying hens
Mixed-stock pigs

Two-many horses

Reply
post #8 of 9

I seen a pic several years ago in ''Georgia Outdoor News '' of a turkey that a man had shot during a turkey hunt. It looked like a bourbon red. Don't know if was a domestic gone wild or there was some mix breeding going on between wild and domestic turkeys. My uncle had some turkeys that left with some wild turkeys once.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagerdogger 

I think we, as turkey growers, should make every effort not to let our birds breed with wild birds.  The genetics for behaviour are certainly different, and while some may tolerate the poorer domestication of the cross, it's much worse if the genes in the wild population are diluted with the domestic genes that we bring there.  The wild birds have been selected for the diet available and predator avoidance for a long time.  It doesn't take too much influence from domesticated crossing to damage these traits.  There are excellent examples of this documented for a number of fish species.

We also wouldn't want to introduce any domestic diseases to wild flocks.

Just my 2 cents.


thumbsupwink

Most states it is also illeagle to let your pets breed with wilds.  It does make the wilds bigger, slower and dumber.  It can destroy a wild population.

Black Copper Marans, BLRW, SLW, GLW, B,B,S Ameracaunas, EE chickens, Guineas(Pearl, Royal Purple & Lavender), Royal Palms,Standard Bronze, Sweetgrass, Narragansett, Golden Narragansett, Bourbon Red turkeys,  Red Golden, Yellow Golden, Ringneck Pheasants, A&M quail, Black Shoulder, Bronze, White, Pied & IB Peafowl!
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Black Copper Marans, BLRW, SLW, GLW, B,B,S Ameracaunas, EE chickens, Guineas(Pearl, Royal Purple & Lavender), Royal Palms,Standard Bronze, Sweetgrass, Narragansett, Golden Narragansett, Bourbon Red turkeys,  Red Golden, Yellow Golden, Ringneck Pheasants, A&M quail, Black Shoulder, Bronze, White, Pied & IB Peafowl!
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