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Green eggs

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

:/My wife just asked me if I had ever heard of chicken eggs having a real good egg yoke and the what is suppose to be white  around it green.I have never heard of it and am hoping that someone can give me some info.A friend of hers had told her today that she had been given some eggs and this is what she got.Need to know if this is normal of a degree and can they be eaten.Looking for an education.Thanks

Lil White House Home for my ladies  

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Lil White House Home for my ladies  

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post #2 of 12

Here's some info for you. smile

http://www.eggsafety.org/consumers/consumer-faqs#STRUCTURE6

Off-color such as pink, green or iridescent egg white:
Spoilage due to Pseudomonas bacteria, which produces a greenish, fluorescent, water-soluble pigment in the egg white
Black or green spots inside the egg Results of bacterial or fungal contamination of the egg.   

In contrast to what's safe to eat...
Green ring on HARD-cooked yolk: Caused by sulfur and iron compounds in the reacting on the surface of the yolk, result of overcooking.  (Perfectly safe to eat.)

post #3 of 12

If the anything in the egg other than the shell is green don't eat it! But it is normal for the shell to be a blue or green shade. If it is just the shell that's greenish go for it! The egg is just fine. I eat blue shelled eggs all the time. Chickens that lay greenish or blue shades are often found under the name Ameraucanas or Easter Eggers.

My favorite chicken breeds are Blue Wheaten Ameraucanas,  Black Copper Marans and Norwegian Jaerhons,  I love raising chickens and talking about them. I'm working on breeding projects to better improve my favorite breeds!  I admit... I'm addicted to hatching!
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My favorite chicken breeds are Blue Wheaten Ameraucanas,  Black Copper Marans and Norwegian Jaerhons,  I love raising chickens and talking about them. I'm working on breeding projects to better improve my favorite breeds!  I admit... I'm addicted to hatching!
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post #4 of 12

When you hardboil an egg there can be a green ring around the yoke. Ive read it some where in a chicken book that it is caused by too much iron in the water. Is that what your asking??

If its uncooked and its green that is not good!

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenegglover 

When you hardboil an egg there can be a green ring around the yoke. Ive read it some where in a chicken book that it is caused by too much iron in the water. Is that what your asking??

If its uncooked and its green that is not good!


From what I understand, if a hard boiled egg has the green or gray ring it's overcooked. I've managed to make a few without but somehow even when I get a couple out in time, by the time I get the rest out they are already ringed. I mentioned this to my MIL and she said she thought hard boiled eggs are supposed to have the gray/green ring.

It's supposedly sulfur or something...

My Chicken Blog
My NEW coop!
germophobic farmwife and mom to 3 homeschooled kids, 1 dog, 2 cats, 2 rabbits, and 15 chickens (5 red stars, 5 silver laced wyandottes, and 5 easter eggers)

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My Chicken Blog
My NEW coop!
germophobic farmwife and mom to 3 homeschooled kids, 1 dog, 2 cats, 2 rabbits, and 15 chickens (5 red stars, 5 silver laced wyandottes, and 5 easter eggers)

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post #6 of 12

My girls never had irony water at the old house and I never had a ring around hard boiled eggs, now the water I have you can smell the iron in the water and now I get the green ring.

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by gale65 
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenegglover 

When you hardboil an egg there can be a green ring around the yoke. Ive read it some where in a chicken book that it is caused by too much iron in the water. Is that what your asking??

If its uncooked and its green that is not good!


From what I understand, if a hard boiled egg has the green or gray ring it's overcooked. I've managed to make a few without but somehow even when I get a couple out in time, by the time I get the rest out they are already ringed. I mentioned this to my MIL and she said she thought hard boiled eggs are supposed to have the gray/green ring.

It's supposedly sulfur or something...


It is actually a reaction between the sulfur and the iron in the egg and it is caused by being cooked for too long. If you put the eggs in the water and bring it to a rolling boil and then remove the pot from the heat and let it sit for about 18 minutes the green won't be on the yolk.  smile  The reaction only occurs from being at a high temperature for too long. Still safe to eat though...just not as pretty. lol  smile  As for the OP, the egg shouldn't be green inside at all. I would say that is a bad egg and not to eat it.

I have a husband, two young children, two dogs: Miri and Mara, two EE's: Friendly and Ellie, one Black Australorp: Licorice, one Barred Rock: Cloud, one Red Sexlink: Too Sexy, one Rhode Island Red: Cinnamon
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I have a husband, two young children, two dogs: Miri and Mara, two EE's: Friendly and Ellie, one Black Australorp: Licorice, one Barred Rock: Cloud, one Red Sexlink: Too Sexy, one Rhode Island Red: Cinnamon
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post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloom_ss 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gale65 
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenegglover 

When you hardboil an egg there can be a green ring around the yoke. Ive read it some where in a chicken book that it is caused by too much iron in the water. Is that what your asking??

If its uncooked and its green that is not good!


From what I understand, if a hard boiled egg has the green or gray ring it's overcooked. I've managed to make a few without but somehow even when I get a couple out in time, by the time I get the rest out they are already ringed. I mentioned this to my MIL and she said she thought hard boiled eggs are supposed to have the gray/green ring.

It's supposedly sulfur or something...


It is actually a reaction between the sulfur and the iron in the egg and it is caused by being cooked for too long. If you put the eggs in the water and bring it to a rolling boil and then remove the pot from the heat and let it sit for about 18 minutes the green won't be on the yolk.  smile  The reaction only occurs from being at a high temperature for too long. Still safe to eat though...just not as pretty. lol  smile  As for the OP, the egg shouldn't be green inside at all. I would say that is a bad egg and not to eat it.


Actually I bring them to a boil, remove from the heat, and let sit 15-16 min and get the ring. The first one or two I take out of the water (to test for doneness) are perfect. The rest have the ring. So apparently that minute or two extra makes all the difference.

My Chicken Blog
My NEW coop!
germophobic farmwife and mom to 3 homeschooled kids, 1 dog, 2 cats, 2 rabbits, and 15 chickens (5 red stars, 5 silver laced wyandottes, and 5 easter eggers)

Reply

My Chicken Blog
My NEW coop!
germophobic farmwife and mom to 3 homeschooled kids, 1 dog, 2 cats, 2 rabbits, and 15 chickens (5 red stars, 5 silver laced wyandottes, and 5 easter eggers)

Reply
post #9 of 12

To avoid overcooking (and that green from overcooking, if it matters) I  bring the eggs just to barely a boil then instantly remove the pan from the heat and set aside for 15 minutes at the most, then immediately pour off the hot water and instantly cover the eggs with ice, and a little water, while crackling the shells all over in the icy water...the eggs rapidly chill that way in just a couple of minutes and the shells easily slip off in the cold water bath or under cold running water without denting the eggs and there's no green from overcooking.  Overcooking even 1 minute will create the green.  (Ease in peeling, even with an ice bath, applies to eggs aged at least a couple of weeks or more.  Eggs kept on the counter a few days may have the same results as eggs aged a couple of weeks in the frig since unrefrig'd eggs age very quickly.)


Edited by dewey - 11/2/11 at 2:11am
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by trooper 

:/My wife just asked me if I had ever heard of chicken eggs having a real good egg yoke and the what is suppose to be white  around it green.I have never heard of it and am hoping that someone can give me some info.A friend of hers had told her today that she had been given some eggs and this is what she got.Need to know if this is normal of a degree and can they be eaten.Looking for an education.Thanks


Some people inject food dye into eggs before hatching to cause the chick to be hatched out that color. If the white is green , I'd bet that's what she got, from someone being creative for green eggs and ham. I did it once for a preschool project. Dyed the ham too, hehe


Edited by wolftracks - 11/2/11 at 2:48am
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Learn About The Egg Train!   Egg Train State Coordinators  Join The Egg Train
Wife of Bill Riley 2/4/49-7/12/10 Save a spot for me!         Need hatching eggs?
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