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to worm or not to worm? - Page 2

post #11 of 32
Thread Starter 

ok so I used wazine,  I am a bit worried because it says on the bottle not to use on egg layers.  can I not eat or sell the eggs ever now?  I have in the past used this then hit with ivermectin and then kept an eye out for paste butts.  I am not even sure any more it that is really from worms...

I am going to go online and get some of the black walnuts and plant a tree so when our son is like 50 he will have a black wall nut tree gee they grow slow....

post #12 of 32

They really do grow slowly, lol.  You can buy the walnut powder though. Online and in health food stores. I have been thinking about selling it myself. Just don't wanna go through the trouble f no one wants to buy it, lol.

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Seemeth it a small thing unto you to have eaten up the good pasture, but ye must tread down with your feet the residue of your pastures? and to have drunk of the deep waters, but ye must foul the residue with your feet?

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post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCourson05 

If you use fenbendazole, or another -zole wormer, you don't have a withdraw period for eggs. If you use -ectins like ivermectin, you have to discard the eggs. Wazine is another wormer that you have to withdraw eggs, but it is probably the most thorough wormer...

I worm at least twice a year at the time changes... Did it this past weekend.


Gosh, I thought fenbendazole - Safeguard/Panacur- had a two week withdrawal.

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post #14 of 32

I hope I did this right. I think that you should check out this link to a previos thread. It will answer most if not all of your questions.  There seems to be some mass confusion on worming.  I know when I was learning I found it very confusing.


http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=576036&p=1

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One very understanding husband, two wonderful daughters, 1 Chocolate Lab (Olie Bear), 2 cats (KC & Charlie) a flock of 34 chickens (and counting  ) and 5 ducks.

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post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurelRidgeDreams 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCourson05 

If you use fenbendazole, or another -zole wormer, you don't have a withdraw period for eggs. If you use -ectins like ivermectin, you have to discard the eggs. Wazine is another wormer that you have to withdraw eggs, but it is probably the most thorough wormer...
I worm at least twice a year at the time changes... Did it this past weekend.


Gosh, I thought fenbendazole - Safeguard/Panacur- had a two week withdrawal.


It's not even labled for chickens, how could it have a withdrawal period for their eggs?
Panacur (fendendazole) will kill ALL worms except tapes and is super easy to find. Valbazen (albendazole) will kill ll in addition to tapes. Both need repeated 10 days later. I don't throw out eggs no matter what ai use. But to each his own.
CCourson-Wazine is NOT a thorough wormer at all! Why would you say that with checking your facts 1st? I'm sorry but this is how all the misinformation gets passed around. Wazine ONLY kills roundworms, that it, no other kind of worm. It's about as worthless of a wormer as they come but happens to be the *only one labeled specifically for poultry because of government red tape.

post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by CluckyJay 

I am not sure that the DE would work as a dewormer. I think it has to be dry to kill insects. It is still really awesome to use in their feed to keep it fresh though. And I think it may be good for their feather as well.

I use black walnut and some other natural stuff. I did do an autopsy on some of my ladies that got murdered throughout the year. No worms I could see! I have never used a synthetic dewormer and they are always freeranging.




Ditto this statement.  Been keeping chickens off and on for 35 years and never used chemical deworming methods.  Been eating those same chickens and have never seen worms in their intestines(and, yes, I do look~I examine all their organs for healthy appearance).

You can also use a drop or two of Dawn detergent every now and again for deworming.  Pumpkin seeds, walnut hulls([preferably green when obtained), soap, charred wood, wood ashes...any of these or combination of any can keep your birds cleaned out.

post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beekissed 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CluckyJay 

I am not sure that the DE would work as a dewormer. I think it has to be dry to kill insects. It is still really awesome to use in their feed to keep it fresh though. And I think it may be good for their feather as well.

I use black walnut and some other natural stuff. I did do an autopsy on some of my ladies that got murdered throughout the year. No worms I could see! I have never used a synthetic dewormer and they are always freeranging.




Ditto this statement.  Been keeping chickens off and on for 35 years and never used chemical deworming methods.  Been eating those same chickens and have never seen worms in their intestines(and, yes, I do look~I examine all their organs for healthy appearance).

You can also use a drop or two of Dawn detergent every now and again for deworming.  Pumpkin seeds, walnut hulls([preferably green when obtained), soap, charred wood, wood ashes...any of these or combination of any can keep your birds cleaned out.


Wow, dawn soap? I had no idea. I have read about pumpkins and we've been giving at least 1 a week right now. Can't use walnut whatever as my dd has a life threatening allergy to walnut and I won't have it on the property at all. We have lots of wood ashes though...do you feed them? Or put in the water? Or...??

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My Chicken Blog
My NEW coop!
germophobic farmwife and mom to 3 homeschooled kids, 1 dog, 2 cats, 2 rabbits, and 12 chickens (4 red stars, 2 golden comets, 3 black australorps and 3 easter eggers)

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post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ksane 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurelRidgeDreams 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCourson05 

If you use fenbendazole, or another -zole wormer, you don't have a withdraw period for eggs. If you use -ectins like ivermectin, you have to discard the eggs. Wazine is another wormer that you have to withdraw eggs, but it is probably the most thorough wormer...
I worm at least twice a year at the time changes... Did it this past weekend.


Gosh, I thought fenbendazole - Safeguard/Panacur- had a two week withdrawal.


It's not even labled for chickens, how could it have a withdrawal period for their eggs?
Panacur (fendendazole) will kill ALL worms except tapes and is super easy to find. Valbazen (albendazole) will kill ll in addition to tapes. Both need repeated 10 days later. I don't throw out eggs no matter what ai use. But to each his own.
CCourson-Wazine is NOT a thorough wormer at all! Why would you say that with checking your facts 1st? I'm sorry but this is how all the misinformation gets passed around. Wazine ONLY kills roundworms, that it, no other kind of worm. It's about as worthless of a wormer as they come but happens to be the *only one labeled specifically for poultry because of government red tape.


I'm sorry, I understand Wazine is not a thorough wormer. It's just I thought eggs shouldn't be eaten for two weeks after using fenbendazole or Wazine.

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post #19 of 32

I've never had to worm my chickens. I do fecal samples on my flock and only once had any signs of parasites, and that issue was taken care of with a slight change in management. I urge people to only treat when there is a problem. If you routinely worm with the same chemicals, eventually you'll develop resistant parasites. I've written more about parasites and worming here:
http://www.hencam.com/henblog/2010/01/worms/

Terry Golson

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Terry Golson

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post #20 of 32

We have lots of wood ashes though...do you feed them? Or put in the water? Or...??


Just provide some in the coop in a sturdy wooden box or pan in which they can dust and peck out their own...I've seen my birds do this and also the local barn swallows will really eat up an ash pile.

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