BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Geese › Antibiotics for geese
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Antibiotics for geese

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

My goose was attacked by my dog.  sad  She has a puncture wound on the inside of her thigh.  I've cleaned it up and put lots of neosporen on it.  Vet said that if it gets infected there are daily antibiotic injections I could give her.  Isn't there something else, something to put in water maybe?  I think I have read that on here.

This could have been so much worse.  Thankfully my teenage daughter was able to get the dog to let go of goose.  These dogs are Akitas so I knew this could happen.


Edited by SouthernPride - 12/13/11 at 6:28pm
post #2 of 6

My Avian vet prescribed Baytril for one of my geese.

I have: Bantam Naked Necks, Barred Bearded Olive Eggers, Mini Cheviot Sheep, Mini Rex, Jersey Wooly & Lionhead Rabbits

Selling Locally: Mini Cheviot Lambs, Mini Rex, Jersey Wooly & Lionhead Baby Bunnies

 

Re-homing: (free to BYC'rs) Mini Rex Rabbits: Black Otter Sr. Buck, Broken Castor Doe

Swaps: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/rhranchs-member-page

Contact: byhookorbycrookfarm@yahoo.com

Reply

I have: Bantam Naked Necks, Barred Bearded Olive Eggers, Mini Cheviot Sheep, Mini Rex, Jersey Wooly & Lionhead Rabbits

Selling Locally: Mini Cheviot Lambs, Mini Rex, Jersey Wooly & Lionhead Baby Bunnies

 

Re-homing: (free to BYC'rs) Mini Rex Rabbits: Black Otter Sr. Buck, Broken Castor Doe

Swaps: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/rhranchs-member-page

Contact: byhookorbycrookfarm@yahoo.com

Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks.  I also did a search on here and found Duramycin was used as well.  Duramycin sounds like a general all around antibiotic used for all sorts of animals.  I think I will check my local co-op and see if they have it.

post #4 of 6

Duramycin is cheap and easy to use. We had a toulouse gander get attacked by our old dog and I was sure he was going to die. He lost sooo much flesh you could see his lungs and organs moving sickbyc We kept him in the house in a great dane-sized dog crate and even let him walk around after a few days. His first few baths were in the cement tub with Oxine AH in the water.  I sprayed his wounds daily with Bactine plus pain relief.
He never did get an infection, and except for the huge wave of feathers that runs down his entire chest, you'd never know he was injured. big_smile

The secret of happiness, you see, is not found in seeking more, but in developing the capacity to enjoy less
-Socrates
Reply
The secret of happiness, you see, is not found in seeking more, but in developing the capacity to enjoy less
-Socrates
Reply
post #5 of 6

Baytril should not have been prescribed by a bird vet for a duck, goose, chicken, or other food/poultry bird.  Baytril is a high-powered antibiotic which may NOT be legally used in food animals except under very strict limits - and those limits don't include poultry.

Antibiotics in general are restricted in meat/egg animals - even if you can get them over the counter, one is not supposed to use them in animals for which that drug isn't labeled (if the label on the drug says 'for use in poultry for infection' for example, then it is labeled for poultry.)  This is to prevent drugs getting into the meat and eggs we eat.

If you have more questions, please see a farm vet or check out farad.org

"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares."

- George Washington
Reply
"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares."

- George Washington
Reply
post #6 of 6

Go down to the feed store and buy one of the powdered antibiotics that go into the drinking water.  Several of them are labeled for use in poultry.

You will probably have to carefully measure the contents of the envelop and figure out how much to use in a gallon of water, because the usual use is to put the entire envelope into many gallons of water for a large number of animals. Make a note on the packet and store the excess in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

Any feed store will at least have Terramycin or tetracycline.  Either one will be good for treating wounds.  Both are good for respiratory, so it doesn't hurt to keep them on hand if you've got poultry.

Always give a complete course of antibiotics.  Don't stop as soon as it looks better. Complete the course.

I would continue to clean the wound and apply the topical antibiotic, too.

Tylan is labeled for poultry and it is a very strong antibiotic, but also very expensive and must be ordered on-line.  There is very little chance your feed store will carry it.  I seem to remember that I paid $50 for the bottle of Tylan that I've got in my fridge. If your feed store does have it, it is used for intestinal problems, so you are still probably better off with the much cheaper terramycin or tetracycline.

Yes, you can give antibiotic injections and you should certainly consider getting something from the vet if the ointment and the oral antibiotic don't work. If you don't know how to give shots, time to learn.


Edited by Oregon Blues - 12/15/11 at 11:45am

Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

Reply

Exhibition quality Blue Swedish Ducks and Gray Saddleback Pomeranian Geese,   Hatching eggs available in late winter and spring. NPIP

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Geese
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Geese › Antibiotics for geese