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Show Off Your American Gamefowl!!! - Page 7

post #61 of 539

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by centrarchid View Post

 

 

Yes, like in picture.

 

 

When only one hen bred by a rooster he stays with her around the clock.  With up to three hens rooster is rotated daily between pens at end of day so he is with a given hen every second or third day.  Roosters used as such are very tame and walk between pens on their own.  Takes time to get that down ahead of breeding season.  You gotta be on toes to make certain he goes to proper hen pen and not to another rooster.  With a more wiley cock used to cover two hens, I let him and both hens free a few minutes before dark.  They feed before going roost on front porch.  After dark I collect them and put hens back in respective cages and rooster in with appropriate hen.  In reality he likely more than does job of covering hens during the 15-30 mminutes before going to roost but having him shack up with ladies keeps need for number of pens down.

 

sounds to me like youv'e got some pretty good boys there well thanks for all the info much appreciated

post #62 of 539

GEDC0448.JPG

marsh butcher and my daughter lol

post #63 of 539

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fowlfrenzy1029 View Post

 

 

sounds to me like youv'e got some pretty good boys there well thanks for all the info much appreciated

 

I do not think there is anything special about my birds.  Prior to a change in rearing technique a few years ago, many of my stags in particular were down right flighty and required an extended period of time to acclimate them to handling.  If they are tamed as chicks, whether hen raised or not, they are much easier to work with as adults even years after last handled.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #64 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by fowlfrenzy1029 View Post

GEDC0448.JPG

marsh butcher and my daughter lol

 

 

One of my bullstags on job last year.  He was trained for casual handling.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/41527_eduardo_and_kid_under_moms_watch.jpg

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #65 of 539

Hen shown earlier with 17 chicks, still has 17 chicks at 11 days post-hatch.

 

 

LL

 

 

 

LL

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #66 of 539

tongue.png

Getting - R - Done At Langdon's Fowl Farm: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/langdons-fowl-farm

 

My Wife's Swap Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/maryruthswaps

   (shhh... don't tell her I am swapping with her stuff... bahaha !)

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Getting - R - Done At Langdon's Fowl Farm: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/langdons-fowl-farm

 

My Wife's Swap Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/maryruthswaps

   (shhh... don't tell her I am swapping with her stuff... bahaha !)

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post #67 of 539
What a wonderful thread!

I am getting a flock of these tomorrow, but need to select which ones to get. Could some use pictures of their own birds to point out good points and flaws in that bird? I would also love to know how to pick good hens and pullets.

Thank you in advance!

Proud mom of 7 Archie Kehr Kelso and Hatches. Holiday and Wyatt (cocks) and their ladies, Clemintine, Rosemary, Norma Jean (spangle), Calamity Jane, and Betty Sue (pea comb); as well as 5 Dominique Hens and One Dominique Roo (Basil).

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Proud mom of 7 Archie Kehr Kelso and Hatches. Holiday and Wyatt (cocks) and their ladies, Clemintine, Rosemary, Norma Jean (spangle), Calamity Jane, and Betty Sue (pea comb); as well as 5 Dominique Hens and One Dominique Roo (Basil).

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post #68 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poultry Friend View Post

What a wonderful thread!
I am getting a flock of these tomorrow, but need to select which ones to get. Could some use pictures of their own birds to point out good points and flaws in that bird? I would also love to know how to pick good hens and pullets.
Thank you in advance!

Generally, assessing quality of American games is based upon performance.  Prior to such assessments you can at least cull some based on how they feel in the hand, symmetry, quality of feather and overall signs of vigor.  SOP's exist but I think that is more of a southern thing.  Hens and pullets are selected very much based upon the quality of their father, brothers and male offspring (for hens).

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #69 of 539

OK...how do I know what good feather quality is?

 

I did see somewhere that there are flaws to be avoided, like pigeon keel and beetle brow, but I have no idea what that looks like.

 

Also, how can you test performance when you can't (or refuse to) use these birds in the capacity they were breed for. (and I do! I like the eggs and the breed, but not their past)

Proud mom of 7 Archie Kehr Kelso and Hatches. Holiday and Wyatt (cocks) and their ladies, Clemintine, Rosemary, Norma Jean (spangle), Calamity Jane, and Betty Sue (pea comb); as well as 5 Dominique Hens and One Dominique Roo (Basil).

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Proud mom of 7 Archie Kehr Kelso and Hatches. Holiday and Wyatt (cocks) and their ladies, Clemintine, Rosemary, Norma Jean (spangle), Calamity Jane, and Betty Sue (pea comb); as well as 5 Dominique Hens and One Dominique Roo (Basil).

Reply
post #70 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poultry Friend View Post

OK...how do I know what good feather quality is?

 

I did see somewhere that there are flaws to be avoided, like pigeon keel and beetle brow, but I have no idea what that looks like.

 

Also, how can you test performance when you can't (or refuse to) use these birds in the capacity they were breed for. (and I do! I like the eggs and the breed, but not their past)

The you are setting out to do what others have done to develop many other production breeds whether they be for eggs, meat or fiber (feathers).  Looks will be based on what pleases your eye and egg production is based upon a combination of egg number, egg size, egg quality and if possible to determine the cost of getting those eggs produced.

 

A partial test of performance can be based upon free-range rearing and production.  Predators and disease seem to get unfit first.

 

The looks department of the animals as suggested by the SOP out there is very much a function of past breeding for performance.  Maintenance of such an appearane for a egg production will be decidely artificial.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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