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How do I keep next door neighbor's free range roosters away - Page 2

post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chemguy 

May I ask why the roosters are a threat?  In other words, what problems do you see as arising from their coming over?  Knowing this might help folk to provide you with some ideas.


its a bio hazard  **NOTE TO THE OP** allowing the other animals over from the neighbor is asking for troubles... even tho you are right next to one another... i would try and keep your flock and yard as secure / closed as you can.. there are all kinds of nasty stuff that can come from outside flocks
http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=9241
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=196261
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=181490
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=211485


its unwanted poop from an animal thats not theirs

its more feed because he will want to eat too

I could go on but you get the point


Edited by Dar - 1/2/12 at 1:59pm
i can come off a little strong...i tend to speak first then later put my foot in my mouth


Remember just because you read it on the internet does not make it true research everything carefully and act accordingly
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i can come off a little strong...i tend to speak first then later put my foot in my mouth


Remember just because you read it on the internet does not make it true research everything carefully and act accordingly
Reply
post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evelle 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregon Blues 

Cluckhaven ought to be able to have her own property without the neighbor using it without permission to graze his own animals.  It isn't about whether or not the roosters are doing any harm.  At issue is property rights and invasive inconsiderate neighbors who think they own and are free to use anything and everything that falls within their line of sight.


i could see if that WAS the issue but in a later post she wrote she likes to have the other animal over visiting.. has no problems with the goats or pigs just the roosters wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by CluckHeaven 

Well - we don't want the roosters getting the girls knocked up for one thing....  We have the ladies for egg laying....


In terms of free ranging on our property - I'm likely going to install some basic deer netting around the area where the chickens are likely to go into our neighbors yard - but I'm also hoping that we can figure out something else since the kids like the other animals coming to our place


see she just has an issue with the roosters getting her chickens "pregnant"


for some they dont like or for religious or personal reasons cant have the eggs they eat fertilized

i can come off a little strong...i tend to speak first then later put my foot in my mouth


Remember just because you read it on the internet does not make it true research everything carefully and act accordingly
Reply
i can come off a little strong...i tend to speak first then later put my foot in my mouth


Remember just because you read it on the internet does not make it true research everything carefully and act accordingly
Reply
post #13 of 33

that i also understand smile

it is better to have loved and loss then never loved at all..
no matter how small a pet maybe its always hard to lose one...
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it is better to have loved and loss then never loved at all..
no matter how small a pet maybe its always hard to lose one...
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post #14 of 33

Hens do not get 'knocked up'.  Doesn't work that way in non mammalian species.  And as others have already posted there is nothing wrong with eating fertile eggs.  Three possible solutions come to mind.  Ask the neighbor to keep his roosters home, put up fencing between the yards, keep your hens penned up.  The roosters will not stay away voluntarily.  The desire to pass on DNA (also known as sex) is a an indominatable force.

Friends are the family you make for yourself.
There are no coincidences- only providences.
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Friends are the family you make for yourself.
There are no coincidences- only providences.
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post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by sourland 

Hens do not get 'knocked up'.  Doesn't work that way in non mammalian species.  And as others have already posted there is nothing wrong with eating fertile eggs.  Three possible solutions come to mind.  Ask the neighbor to keep his roosters home, put up fencing between the yards, keep your hens penned up.  The roosters will not stay away voluntarily.  The desire to pass on DNA (also known as sex) is a an indominatable force.


X2


Edited by bobbi-j - 1/2/12 at 2:24pm

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #16 of 33

If I were in a similar situation, then fertile eggs would not be a concern in respect to consumption of eggs.  Since CluckHeaven indicates an interest in free ranging hens, hens will make every effort to visit rooster(s) if rooster(s) can not visit them.  I would ask neighbor to confine roosters for two weeks and get a very physically capable full adult rooster and introduce him to my flock of hens.  The after two weeks are over release birds. Watch make certain fights do nto get too serious.   I would expect my rooster through a variety of mechanisms to keep neighbor's roosters away from his hens.  With 10 acre plots you also have enough acreage where you and your neighbor can influence where the flocks range as a function of where feed is applied.  To incourage your flock away from direction of neighbors roosters, apply feed on side of your property away from those roosters.

Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it.
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post #17 of 33
Thread Starter 

I love that suggestion Centrachid!

Thanks everyone - lots of interesting discussion...

First flock of 14 one year old hens arrived Dec 24, 2011

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First flock of 14 one year old hens arrived Dec 24, 2011

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post #18 of 33

Cabela's sells an air rifle made by GAMO called the Silent Stalker Whisper IGT. It shoots a .177 caliber pellet and comes with a noise dampener. You could resolve your rooster problem and also use this gun to protect your flock from preditors and other harmful varmits.

Barred Rock Chickens, NZ Rabbits and an Austrailian Shepherd named "Cowboy"
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Barred Rock Chickens, NZ Rabbits and an Austrailian Shepherd named "Cowboy"
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post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by centrarchid 

If I were in a similar situation, then fertile eggs would not be a concern in respect to consumption of eggs.  Since CluckHeaven indicates an interest in free ranging hens, hens will make every effort to visit rooster(s) if rooster(s) can not visit them.  I would ask neighbor to confine roosters for two weeks and get a very physically capable full adult rooster and introduce him to my flock of hens.  The after two weeks are over release birds. Watch make certain fights do nto get too serious.   I would expect my rooster through a variety of mechanisms to keep neighbor's roosters away from his hens.  With 10 acre plots you also have enough acreage where you and your neighbor can influence where the flocks range as a function of where feed is applied.  To incourage your flock away from direction of neighbors roosters, apply feed on side of your property away from those roosters.


Very good advice!  It's hard to fight mother nature.  Don't worry about fertile eggs.  There is absolutely no difference btn fertile and non-fertile eggs.  I agree that having a rooster around is a big perk, they do a great job protecting hens!

Happily owned by 7 fluffy butt girls: 1 BO, 3 BA, and 3 Cochins.  Also have 11 hermit crabs, 2 giant african millipedes, a ball python, and a wonderful irish wheaten terrier!  2 awesome boys who love them all!

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Happily owned by 7 fluffy butt girls: 1 BO, 3 BA, and 3 Cochins.  Also have 11 hermit crabs, 2 giant african millipedes, a ball python, and a wonderful irish wheaten terrier!  2 awesome boys who love them all!

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post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by sourland 

Hens do not get 'knocked up'.  Doesn't work that way in non mammalian species.  And as others have already posted there is nothing wrong with eating fertile eggs.  Three possible solutions come to mind.  Ask the neighbor to keep his roosters home, put up fencing between the yards, keep your hens penned up.  The roosters will not stay away voluntarily.  The desire to pass on DNA (also known as sex) is a an indominatable force.


Thank you. What is a knocked up hen??

"The Bluebird of Happiness long absent from his life, Ned is visited by the Chicken of Depression." -- Gary Larson
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"The Bluebird of Happiness long absent from his life, Ned is visited by the Chicken of Depression." -- Gary Larson
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