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Chicken Moat

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Saw this on my Facebook page this morning.

 

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/1988-05-01/Garden-Pest-Control.aspx

 

 

What a great idea....

 

Irene

post #2 of 13

Very interesting article. Thanks for sharing thumbsup.gif

 Say NO to Crested Ducks!                     Common Chicken Practices          Learn more about Avian Influenza

 

 

"Don’t be into trends. Don’t make fashion own you, but you decide what you are, what you want to express by the way you dress and the way you live."

— Gianni Versace

 

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 Say NO to Crested Ducks!                     Common Chicken Practices          Learn more about Avian Influenza

 

 

"Don’t be into trends. Don’t make fashion own you, but you decide what you are, what you want to express by the way you dress and the way you live."

— Gianni Versace

 

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post #3 of 13

Neat article.  I would be interested if anyone has done this and had pictures of their setup.

 

Cheers!

 

Jim

post #4 of 13

There's someone around that has done this on BYC because I've asked about a mote.I'm probably gonna do it around my garden soon. Only, concern I'm having is its so dang hot here how effective will it really be. My garden gets full sun so the chickens will use a few hours in the am & then it will be to hot.

I'm out of eggs. But I know where some brown ones are. I now raise big Ol' Honkin' Bob Whites & Layed back Coturnix. Pray For Rain In Texas!

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I'm out of eggs. But I know where some brown ones are. I now raise big Ol' Honkin' Bob Whites & Layed back Coturnix. Pray For Rain In Texas!

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post #5 of 13

I am planning on building a "moat" around my existing garden which already has 8' high deer fencing. To solve the "hot" problem, I plan to clasp the wiring about halfway up the deer fence and simply bend the fencing and secure it to the ground, essentially making a tunnel for the chickens. This should protect them from predators AND I can plant things like peas and other climbing plants outside the tunnel to grow over the tunnel, providing them with some fresh stuff to nibble on and more importantly, shade.

Also, their coop is inside the deer fencing raised up on cinder blocks so they can huddle under the coop for shade as well. I am going to fence off the half of the garden that is inside the deer fencing and allow the chickens to fertilize and eat all the weeds on the un-planted side, so I can use it for next year. We will cut a little opening in the deer fence that will feed into the tunnel moat.

Any expert advice out there for this plan? I think it will be pretty great, but it is an experiment.

post #6 of 13

I think it's a great idea. A whole lot of work, but a great idea for all the reasons listed. Seems like it would be worth all the trouble. I wish I had an area big enough for it.

3 young Silkies, 1 Brittany bird dog, 1 Chihuahua mix, a ferrel kitty and me!

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3 young Silkies, 1 Brittany bird dog, 1 Chihuahua mix, a ferrel kitty and me!

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post #7 of 13

We did it on Sunday and finished in one day! I love it. It looks great and I can't wait to move the chicks out there. I think they will be very happy.Here is a view of the veggie garden side. As you can see, the chicks will eat all the grass and weeds around the veggies with no access to the veggies themselves.We built a gate and fence with chicken wire inside the deer fencing to divide the veggies from the inside chicken run. The A-frame coop is to my right.Here you can see the coop.The view from inside the veggie garden.This is the side behind the coop. They will enter the tunnel through a small hole we will cut into the deer fencing. They will be able to circle around the whole garden and re-enter through a hole we cut on the other side. We don't want them to get confused or feel trapped on the other side!The tunnel on the opposite side of the coop where they can re-enter the main run area. As you can see, we are securing the additional 6 inches of 2x2 fencing we laid on the ground with leftover firewood. There are angled landscape staples where the fencing first hits the ground, then the fence is bent at about 90 degrees and laid on the ground. Eventually grass and weeds will grow between the logs and through the fencing, protecting the tunnel from predators (in theory, at least;)Chicken's eye view.The big picture. We can lounge on our deck and be entertained by the chickens all day!Another chicken's eye view from the spacious back side (veggie side).This picture illustrates how we so easily linked the fence together at the corners and to the existing deer fencing with hog rings. You can buy a box of 100 for about $3 at your local Grange or hardware store and spend around $10 on the special pliers made for clamping them together. It was worth the purchase! By the end of the day, we had all kinds of silly ideas about projects we could make with hog rings, including jewelry!

 

I will try to remember to post some updates as things progress. In a perfect world, we will move the chicks out here and nothing will go wrong and we will live happily ever after! We are keeping our fingers crossed that this will be the case. If not, we will learn and adjust and I will share what we learned. Please leave comments with any advice or recommendations for us. We are new at this and want to be as successful as possible. Thanks!

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicachica View Post

We did it on Sunday and finished in one day! I love it. It looks great and I can't wait to move the chicks out there. I think they will be very happy.

I will try to remember to post some updates as things progress. In a perfect world, we will move the chicks out here and nothing will go wrong and we will live happily ever after! We are keeping our fingers crossed that this will be the case. If not, we will learn and adjust and I will share what we learned. Please leave comments with any advice or recommendations for us. We are new at this and want to be as successful as possible. Thanks!


In case some of you are not familiar with this site (like me), if you click on each photo and then click again (or just hover your mouse over it), you can read the comments I attached to each photo. I hope this will be helpful to someone, or entertaining at the least!


Edited by nicachica - 5/30/12 at 9:51am
post #9 of 13

Seems pretty awesome. I'd do it if I had a fenced garden. Alas I just have a few bath tubs that discourage ground diggers but do nothing to prevent the **** rabbits.

Loving my poultry. Have Guineas as well!

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Loving my poultry. Have Guineas as well!

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post #10 of 13

That is fantastic NicaChica! I love what you've done. I think your chicks will be very happy and I heard that they moved into their coop today. I hope that was successful and you aren't worrying about the rain tonight. They will be just fine. Khalila looked adorable helping you with their move. I'm super happy for you guys!

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