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bleeding out

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I see lots of folks use the hatchet or otherwise dispatch by cutting off the head. But when i tried that I had blood collect in the backs and shoulders while I plucked their bellies. This after using the kill cone and bleeding them out thoroughly. At least I thought I did. So I went back to throat slitting, which allows the heart to keep bleeding them out longer. At least that's my thoughts. Much like cutting a fish's gills before bonking them on the head.

Anyone else experience same? Thoughts?
post #2 of 6

Same here, Gscott.  I prefer puncturing the jugular, holding the feet, and letting them flap all they can.

Hi!  I'm Bryan, and Smiles-N-Sunshine is my hobby farm.

 

Smiles-N-Sunshine Farm (Palominas, Arizona):  Black Australorp chickens, and mealworms.  Protected by Ottoman the Turkey.
 

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Hi!  I'm Bryan, and Smiles-N-Sunshine is my hobby farm.

 

Smiles-N-Sunshine Farm (Palominas, Arizona):  Black Australorp chickens, and mealworms.  Protected by Ottoman the Turkey.
 

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post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Well, thanks.  I had used the kill cone for the "calming effect".  Calming effect on me, mostly.  Not a big fan of all the flapping about.  I remember my grandfather lopping off their heads with an axe and wiring them to the coop fence by the feet with wire to bleed out.  There was a whole lot of mess going on, and I was pretty young.  Something I won't forget.

 

Maybe that is part of the solution, the muscle spasms help bleed it out.  I really hoped for more input, but I guess that's not gonna happen with 36 views and 1 response...

post #4 of 6

I so want to try bleeding them out in a killing cone, but for some reason in my mind this is too personal.   So I continue to chop their heads off and hang them to bleed out by gravity.  

Keeper of 6 Big Girls ( barred rock, partridge rock,  EE, 2 slw) a Cairn Terrier and Calico Cat

Visit my blog at http://lookingoutthewindow.wordpress.com/

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Keeper of 6 Big Girls ( barred rock, partridge rock,  EE, 2 slw) a Cairn Terrier and Calico Cat

Visit my blog at http://lookingoutthewindow.wordpress.com/

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post #5 of 6

if i ever get the guts to kill a bird (haven't gotten my first one yet) i intend to use the cone (i think).  i'm hoping i can sever the jugular & not too much so i can achieve the bleed out you are talking about.  not a big fan of the gore, so them flapping blood everywhere isn't my cup of tea.  however, i can see the possible benefit of them flapping - it probably gets the most blood out of any of the processes.

 

post #6 of 6

I feel it's more human to both break their necks and slit the throat, so I do it that way. I killed a cockerel last night by breaking his neck by hitting the back of the knife I had holding against the back of his neck, then slit the throat. Sometimes I cut the head off in one cut if I can, depending on what tools I'm using. I find a hatchet works well for meaties, but it just bounces off those tough hackles on cockerels and roosters, even if it's sharp enough to shave with! I soaked him in salted water overnight, that takes care of any excess blood. I wish I was strong enough to break the neck with my hands, then slit the throat, I think that would be less traumatic, but I haven't been able to do it. I don't know if I'm not strong enough or if I'm simply not doing it right. by the way, it was a 5 month old hatchery Blue Andalusian. I was very disappointed by all the red in his feathering and complete lack of black lacing, so I wasn't going to breed him so he had to go. Scrawniest bird I have EVER butchered! LOL! He was every bit as tall as my old Delaware rooster, but weighed only 2.5 lbs after cleaning the carcass! SCRAWNY! I hope he at least tastes good! lol. I think that Dellie roo was 8lbs after cleaning. I need to get some more of those. He was the best tasting chicken ever, too.

Wendy, chemist, mama to 4 human children, a crazy Husky/Australian Shepherd cross dog, a cat, several fish, bunnies, 17 goats,and our ever growing flock of chickens, ducks, turkeys, and geese.

My oldest son is breeding BBS Orps! Looking for breeding stock!

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Wendy, chemist, mama to 4 human children, a crazy Husky/Australian Shepherd cross dog, a cat, several fish, bunnies, 17 goats,and our ever growing flock of chickens, ducks, turkeys, and geese.

My oldest son is breeding BBS Orps! Looking for breeding stock!

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