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Another question about introducing new peas to free range flock

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello again pea experts,

I wrote previously asking about introducing some rescued peas into our flock.

Thank you for your excellent advice!

 

Now, having given this more thought, I'm wondering about the amount of space needed for free ranging peas.

Right now we have 8 peas (2 hens), on approximately 6 acres (a guess). (There are also 5 houses on these acres).

Will 3 more peas ( a hen and 2 young fellas) make this too crowded?

It seems to me as though they have plenty of space but I just wanted an opinion from those of you with more experience on this.

I don't want to upset the current pea residents...

 

Thank you for your thoughts!

 


Edited by new 2 pfowl - 1/28/12 at 9:30am

 

 

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post #2 of 12

Great question!  How much room do "free range peafowl" need before they move on to someone elses "free range"?

DH to beautiful wife!
22 Guineas, 2 Serama's, 1 Ameraucana, 5 Silkies, and 1 Cochins, 6 Peafowl, 4 Silver Appleyards, 6 Mandarin ducks, 4 Ringed Teal, 2 Cinnamon Teal, 5 Redgolden pheasant, 1 Siamese Manx, 1 mutt cat, 2 Great Pyrs.
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DH to beautiful wife!
22 Guineas, 2 Serama's, 1 Ameraucana, 5 Silkies, and 1 Cochins, 6 Peafowl, 4 Silver Appleyards, 6 Mandarin ducks, 4 Ringed Teal, 2 Cinnamon Teal, 5 Redgolden pheasant, 1 Siamese Manx, 1 mutt cat, 2 Great Pyrs.
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello again experts,

I realize that this is a difficult question to answer without seeing the area and the peacocks.

 

However, as I am to the point where I have to say "yes" or "no" to these new birds, I am really concerned about the impact they may have on the existing flock.

 

If any of you have thoughts about this, I would greatly appreciate it.

 

Or...any of you in Central Coast/Southern California and have room for rescued peas???

 

Thank you!

 

 

 

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post #4 of 12

Just to start off...My first pair I free-ranged for a month or so so I don't have much free-ranging experience but with that said mine would roost in a tree at the edge of the fence so they would fly down from their roost in the morning landing in the neighbor's backyard. The neighbors were fine with that and that was the only time my peafowl left our property except for the time they ran away that is...That is why I stopped free-ranging but I will do it again someday...Maybe when I live where I keep my peafowl and I have a yard dog...Anyways back on topic I have been to nearby breeders who have two completely different scenarios. One will at times have around 100 peafowl in his fenced in backyard that is an acre or less. The reason they all stay put is 1.) There are a lot of penned birds they hang around and 2.) All around the fence is woods with predators. If they leave the fence they get eaten by a coyote. Then the other breeder has a nice open backyard. Some days you will see her peafowl strolling around the backyard visiting peafowl in the pens and other days they are off in the woods somewhere. She lives near farmland and pecan groves and so some times of the year her flock will cross the street to visit a yard were the people have just cut the grass which in turn the mower cut up some pecans on the ground so the peafowl go to eat that and will be gone for around a month. Some times she has more peafowl then normal because other people's birds will visit hers from time to time. It varies. It is soo hard to say what will happen because anything could happen. There are so many factors like the birds themselves and so many other things. You could try to free-range them and see how it goes and if it doesn't work out you could catch them and sell them or something. You never can really be certain is the way I see it.wink.png Sorry I know you were looking for a yes or no.

7 peafowl: 1 India Blue, 1 blackshoulder, 1 pied, 1 split (pied or white), 3 whites.

Proud to be Native American and happy to have wonderful family & friends.
"Everything is possible with God."

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7 peafowl: 1 India Blue, 1 blackshoulder, 1 pied, 1 split (pied or white), 3 whites.

Proud to be Native American and happy to have wonderful family & friends.
"Everything is possible with God."

Reply
post #5 of 12
I think what MinxFox said is valuable information ... I assume by "rescued" these are peafowl that have not been raised or spent any length of time at your farm... In this case you might consider putting them in a pen for a few weeks before releasing them into the free ranging flock, otherwise they are likely to wander away... Of course you always stand a better chance of their sticking around if they were hatched and raised on site...
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thank you both so much for your thoughts about my situation.

 

Yes, you're right, MinxFox, I was hoping for a "yes" or "no" from someone who knows more than I do.

But at the same time I realize that every situation is different and that there is absolutely no way of predicting what will happen.

 

I guess my biggest fear is doing something that will be harmful to the existing flock of peas (I love them so!).

It seems that this is really unlikely, though.

Maybe the worst case is that the new guys might not like the situation and just leave...

 

Any other opinions are welcome.

I'll let you know what happens!

 

 

 

 

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post #7 of 12

Yes the worst case would probably be the new peafowl leaving, but I don't think you would have to worry too much about the established group of peafowl. Peafowl like to be near other peafowl, so the new birds might fit right in.

7 peafowl: 1 India Blue, 1 blackshoulder, 1 pied, 1 split (pied or white), 3 whites.

Proud to be Native American and happy to have wonderful family & friends.
"Everything is possible with God."

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7 peafowl: 1 India Blue, 1 blackshoulder, 1 pied, 1 split (pied or white), 3 whites.

Proud to be Native American and happy to have wonderful family & friends.
"Everything is possible with God."

Reply
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks!

That makes me feel better, definitely don't want to upset the gang...

 

 

The Gang.jpg

 

 

 

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post #9 of 12

THAT is an awesome Pea pic, LOVE IT! love.gif Sooooooooo El Naturale !!! Gorgeous gorgeous gorgeous!!! What a lucky lucky gang!

Thanks for sharing!!!! thumbsup.gif

... Flew the Coop, Twice.
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... Flew the Coop, Twice.
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post #10 of 12

Wow I was thinking it was pretty where you are but that is just beautiful! I just love big oak trees and I am sure those peafowl are roosting in those big trees at night. I love the stump the two young males are standing on. The tree I said my pair would roost in was a large oak tree like the ones in your photo. It was cool to get up early and watch them fly down from the tree.

7 peafowl: 1 India Blue, 1 blackshoulder, 1 pied, 1 split (pied or white), 3 whites.

Proud to be Native American and happy to have wonderful family & friends.
"Everything is possible with God."

Reply

7 peafowl: 1 India Blue, 1 blackshoulder, 1 pied, 1 split (pied or white), 3 whites.

Proud to be Native American and happy to have wonderful family & friends.
"Everything is possible with God."

Reply
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