BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › How do I increase my chicken's protein?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How do I increase my chicken's protein?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

My chickens are apparantly picking each other's tail feathers due to low protein.  I thought it was molting.  Someone on here suggested mites which I checked for and they are all clear.  So that leaves picking.  How do I increase their intake so they quit that picking?  Thanks!

post #2 of 11

How old are they? Is it possible that they are molting?

Tressa

Certified Chicken Addict! 23 Hens, 8 Roosters, a Standard Poodle & two AMAZING kids.....

Living the good life at Rocking Horse Ranch!

Reply

Tressa

Certified Chicken Addict! 23 Hens, 8 Roosters, a Standard Poodle & two AMAZING kids.....

Living the good life at Rocking Horse Ranch!

Reply
post #3 of 11

Can cat food  is a great source of protein and dry cat food.

                             *Pure English Orpington Breeder *

* Spangle/Mottle Orpingtons* *Partridge Orpingtons* Jubilee Orpingtons *Silver Laced Orpingtons *BBS Orpingtons * English Lavenders* *LF Chocolates* *Chocolate bantam* *Red Orpingtons*

* Autumn Farm Orpingtons *

  

Reply

                             *Pure English Orpington Breeder *

* Spangle/Mottle Orpingtons* *Partridge Orpingtons* Jubilee Orpingtons *Silver Laced Orpingtons *BBS Orpingtons * English Lavenders* *LF Chocolates* *Chocolate bantam* *Red Orpingtons*

* Autumn Farm Orpingtons *

  

Reply
post #4 of 11

What type of feed are you currently feeding them?

BEAKTIME

Reply

BEAKTIME

Reply
post #5 of 11

I increase the protein content in my hens' feed during the winter and particularly after molting, since feathers are principally comprised of a protein called keratin.  I mix game bird food 1:1 with my laying crumbles.  The game bird food has more protein than laying rations, so when mixed, you get an increase in overall protein content without overloading on protein.  Also, I save eggs throughout the year and hard-boil them and mash them up, shell and all and freeze them for future use.  When the girls need extra protein, I thaw a large bag and mix with raw oatmeal and some flax oil.  They love it and it gives them extra nutrition in addition to their daily scratch and layer crumble.  I also increase protein in the hens' diet when I plan to incubate eggs for hatching.

I have a large flock and sell eggs to a health food store as well as private customers.  I love my birds and spend a lot of time with them,  I've raised most of them from chicks so they are very friendly and comfortable with people.  I keep them enclosed in a 60x60' pen that has two large coops for nesting and roosting.  Chickens are great entertainment!

Reply

I have a large flock and sell eggs to a health food store as well as private customers.  I love my birds and spend a lot of time with them,  I've raised most of them from chicks so they are very friendly and comfortable with people.  I keep them enclosed in a 60x60' pen that has two large coops for nesting and roosting.  Chickens are great entertainment!

Reply
post #6 of 11

there are lots of ways to increase protien...people raise mealworms, feed animal protiens, feed foods like black oil sunflower seeds, game bird feed also has more protien. That may help too. Oh! Mine love scrambled eggs and boiled eggs mashed up!

Permitted wildlife rehabber, specializing in the North American Bobcat

 

Reply

Permitted wildlife rehabber, specializing in the North American Bobcat

 

Reply
post #7 of 11

I have given my gals wet cat food, beans and rice, mealworms, and scrambled eggs to name a few.  There are some really great suggestions in this thread and I plan on trying a few myself.  I currently have a mealworm farm about 2/3 of the way to producing more mealies.  The girls just love the mealies!

post #8 of 11


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by misidawnrn View Post

My chickens are apparantly picking each other's tail feathers due to low protein.  I thought it was molting.  Someone on here suggested mites which I checked for and they are all clear.  So that leaves picking.  How do I increase their intake so they quit that picking?  Thanks!


Did you dust your bird or just check for mite also what type of feed are you feeding?

 

If you just checked and didn't dust I would dust them anyways, some mites can be hard to see.

Also check and see if your feed contains animal protein, a lot of people have problems with feather picking/eating when there birds are feed a vegetarian based feed. 

 

Chris

 

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

I feed them approximately an equal mix of layer crumbles,  hard winter wheat from our farm and scratch grains (the scratch grains because it is winter and cold and I thought they need extra corn for heat).  They also get table scraps about every other day or so.  I picked through their feathers at night with a flash light and also rubbed the bottom of their roosts with a white towel like I read to do to find blood...nothing.  I think it is a picker.  They are molting because they all look like the have new feathers growing in but some of them have very bald butts.  Thanks for the suggestions.  I will try that. 

011.JPG

post #10 of 11

My thought is to reduce the amount of scratch grains.  Scratch is maybe 8% protein, so if they fill up on that, they won't eat as much higher-protein layer pellets.  I think I've read that scratch grains should be no more than 10% of the diet, but I can't swear it.  (We give about two cups at the end of the day for 20 chickens and 5 turkeys.)

Hi!  I'm Bryan, and Smiles-N-Sunshine is my hobby farm.

 

Smiles-N-Sunshine Farm (Palominas, Arizona):  Black Australorp chickens, and mealworms.  Protected by Ottoman the Turkey.
 

Reply

Hi!  I'm Bryan, and Smiles-N-Sunshine is my hobby farm.

 

Smiles-N-Sunshine Farm (Palominas, Arizona):  Black Australorp chickens, and mealworms.  Protected by Ottoman the Turkey.
 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Feeding & Watering Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › How do I increase my chicken's protein?