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Caponizing

post #1 of 166
Thread Starter 

I am going to try caponizing for the first time this year since I am going to have way too many cockerels to be keeping them around.

I want to ask those who have done this before,

How long to get a capon to a good enough size to butcher, dressing out around 6-pounds?  I know the purebreds just don't put on the meat by the time I need to get rid of them, so I want to find out how long I can expect them to take.

Also, I am sure it says in the book I ordered, but just asking experienced people too, at what age do you caponize them?

Thanks.

 

3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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post #2 of 166

Depending on the breed (Orp's or Del's) 8 - 10 months for absolutely the best tasting bird you'll ever experience! They also continue to grow a bit larger with time, and do not require the freezer until they are needed. I think the most advantageous time to caponize is between weeks 4 and 5, when the chicks are about one pound (early broilers).  If this is to be your first go at it, expect to lose a couple. If you do, then process them for the broiler.  Practice the technique on any chick that dies (even pullets) so that you can safely identify the first pair of ribs, become more acquanted with chick anatomy, and get accustomed to your tools. I have 20 day old cockerals arriving in the morning for the purpose of capons.  Good Luck. 

Raising Capons for our families consumption.  Teaching, coaching, and encouraging both caponizing and home processing of poultry on the Olympic Peninsula.

On-site Processing available  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Poultry-Processing-Olympic-Peninsula/282197605263857

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Raising Capons for our families consumption.  Teaching, coaching, and encouraging both caponizing and home processing of poultry on the Olympic Peninsula.

On-site Processing available  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Poultry-Processing-Olympic-Peninsula/282197605263857

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post #3 of 166

Good luck, let us know how things work out.

These aren't your Grandfather's chickens.

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These aren't your Grandfather's chickens.

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post #4 of 166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by naillikwj82 View Post

Depending on the breed (Orp's or Del's) 8 - 10 months for absolutely the best tasting bird you'll ever experience! They also continue to grow a bit larger with time, and do not require the freezer until they are needed. I think the most advantageous time to caponize is between weeks 4 and 5, when the chicks are about one pound (early broilers).  If this is to be your first go at it, expect to lose a couple. If you do, then process them for the broiler.  Practice the technique on any chick that dies (even pullets) so that you can safely identify the first pair of ribs, become more acquanted with chick anatomy, and get accustomed to your tools. I have 20 day old cockerals arriving in the morning for the purpose of capons.  Good Luck. 


THANKS!

I was hoping to process earlier than that though.  How many pounds are they at 8-10 months?  I have the breeds listed in my signature line.  I am sure my Cornish will be ready earlier than the others, if I even bother caponizing them.  They dress out pretty good in 4-5 months without, but I wouldn't mind trying it to get some with more meat on them.  I also want to avoid having a bunch of teenagers scrapping over the girls in the pasture too.  They get to that point of about 4 months and they all want to attack each other and overbreed the girls like crazy.

I appreciate you sharing your experience.

Theri

 

 

3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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post #5 of 166

Yes, you can process earlier, but you will not see the increase in weight yet. At 8 -10 months your birds (Orps, Aust, and Cornis) will dress out at about 8 pounds.  The other plus of capons is without the testosterone in the system the birds have a laid back attitude. They still scratch about, and free range, but don't waste energy with aggressive behavior, which equates to more energy in growing bigger! The body fat is distributed through out the meat, instead of between the meat and skin for a much juicier bird.  Comparable ie would be a bull versus a steer. I would speculate that the bantams would also have attitude changes, but would still be a small bird (no experience with bantams). Give it a try and after you taste one, you'll want more! Delicious! 

Raising Capons for our families consumption.  Teaching, coaching, and encouraging both caponizing and home processing of poultry on the Olympic Peninsula.

On-site Processing available  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Poultry-Processing-Olympic-Peninsula/282197605263857

Reply

Raising Capons for our families consumption.  Teaching, coaching, and encouraging both caponizing and home processing of poultry on the Olympic Peninsula.

On-site Processing available  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Poultry-Processing-Olympic-Peninsula/282197605263857

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post #6 of 166

Good luck.  I caponized one chicken in an animal management class at MSU 30 + years ago, that took care of any desire to have capons. Of course I got too close to the ether and was really sick from it.  I later learned over 80% of the chickens ( we did young chicks) died.  But of course they were all "first attempts".  I don't know if its still available, but there was a pellet on the market that you implanted that chemically did it.  I have to believe the survival rate would be much enhanced.

post #7 of 166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by naillikwj82 View Post

Yes, you can process earlier, but you will not see the increase in weight yet. At 8 -10 months your birds (Orps, Aust, and Cornis) will dress out at about 8 pounds.  The other plus of capons is without the testosterone in the system the birds have a laid back attitude. They still scratch about, and free range, but don't waste energy with aggressive behavior, which equates to more energy in growing bigger! The body fat is distributed through out the meat, instead of between the meat and skin for a much juicier bird.  Comparable ie would be a bull versus a steer. I would speculate that the bantams would also have attitude changes, but would still be a small bird (no experience with bantams). Give it a try and after you taste one, you'll want more! Delicious! 



I should have clarified, my Cornish are Standards.  I am thinking about getting some bantams, but no room for more banties at this time, but if I get any more I may try some WLRCornish banties.

I certainly understand what differences I should expect.  I am just going to feel terrible if I go and caponize the best boys.  That is a chance to take though, I can't keep 100 cockerels around for the wait and see.  I will try it on my crosses and my obvious culls.  It sounds like a fantastic way to eat those extras.  I am not squeamish about doing that sort of thing, so I will be fine.  It is funny, I never wanted to be a doctor because I didn't ever want to cut into a person.  I have no problem doing it with animals, but still can't even watch the fake cutting on movies like Grey's Anatomy. lol.png

3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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post #8 of 166

caponized at 6 weeks old, butcher after 20 weeks....better check your laws , you may need a vet to do it.

 

if doing the cornish X do at 3 weeks old...because of their size


Edited by deerman - 2/11/12 at 5:19pm
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post #9 of 166

you will need spreader,hook,ans forceps.........of coarse a knife..make sure you get all the testicle...if not you will have a "slip"  neither a rooster or a capon.

 

 

again 6 lbs at 20 weeks....9 to 10 lbs at 25 weeks ...their peak weight....if you keep them longer still be tender ..but they eat alot more those last few weeks

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post #10 of 166
Thread Starter 

Thanks, deerman.

I bought the caponizing kit that should have everything it in.

I had read where someone uses a straw and fishing line to actually extract the testes.

I was hoping that caponizing would allow for a short finish time, but I guess I was wrong.

Thanks for the info.

 

3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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3 children,1 AMAZING best friend/husband. 3 Std Poodles, lots of rabbits. Owner/Operator of Prairie Chick Poultry. Breeding toward the Standard of Perfection on the following breeds: Buckeyes, New Hampshires, Welsummers, BBS Cochins, White & Blue Silkies, and Easter Eggers.  NPIP MN#41-1143  Hatching and sales of all these.  Also, breeding Dark and WLR Large Fowl Cornish(limited sales). ON FB!
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