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DIY Thread - Let's see your "Inventions". - Page 338

post #3371 of 3688
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Originally Posted by bruceha2000 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by appps View Post


Well bother.
Do you think only another week? I was counting down the reduce temp by 3c per week and thinking it's going to be another month? Or does it sort of plateau out when they feather up and you don't need the gradual decreases?

 

That whole "n degrees for the first week, n-x degrees the next week" thing is a bunch of malarky........

Ditto Dat^

 

 

Here's my notes on chick heat, hope something in there might help:

They need to be pretty warm(~85-90F on the brooder floor right under the lamp and 10-20 degrees cooler at the other end of brooder) for the first day or two, especially if they have been shipped, until they get to eating, drinking and moving around well. But after that it's best to keep them as cool as possible for optimal feather growth and quicker integration to outside temps. A lot of chick illnesses are attributed to too warm of a brooder. I do think it's a good idea to use a thermometer on the floor of the brooder to check the temps, especially when new at brooding, later i still use it but more out of curiosity than need.

 

The best indicator of heat levels is to watch their behavior:

If they are huddled/piled up right under the lamp and cheeping very loudly, they are too cold.

If they are spread out on the absolute edges of the brooder as far from the lamp as possible, panting and/or cheeping very loudly, they are too hot.

If they sleep around the edge of the lamp calmly just next to each other and spend time running all around the brooder they are juuuust right!

 

The lamp is best at one end of the brooder with food/water at the other cooler end of the brooder, so they can get away from the heat or be under it as needed. Wattage of 'heat' bulb depends on size of brooder and ambient temperature of room brooder is in. Regular incandescent bulbs can be used, you might not need a 'heat bulb'. You can get red colored incandescent bulbs at a reptile supply source. A dimmer extension cord is an excellent way to adjust the output of the bulb to change the heat without changing the height of the lamp.

 


Or you could go with a heat plate, commercially made or DIY:  http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/pseudo-brooder-heater-plate

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #3372 of 3688
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceha2000 View Post

.


I think the Sunbeam pad runs about 65W of power. That is per hour. I'm sorry to say that you won't run it with a 45w solar panel unless you have a HUGE bank of batteries already charged. And you need an inverter to convert the 12V to 120V. And you can't charge a battery while it is being used so you need automatic isolating technology to charge part while the other part is being used. Really, much as permanent extension cords are to be avoided, you can get waterproof connectors (if you have to link some together) for a LOT less than solar panels and batteries. Run your MHP off that for a few weeks then pull in the cords. And for the next time, if the ground allows, rent a trencher, make a minimum 18" deep trench between the house and the coop, thread 12-3 wire through underground rated conduit and wire up the coop permanently big_smile.png   Basic electrical work isn't hard but it MUST be done correctly. Reseach this if you are handy, get an electrician otherwise. 


Ahh, I hadn't gotten that far yet in the research, but no doubt you're right. Well I'll have the trencher rented anyway for all the other projects we've been holding off on....so why not....thanks Bruce .
I have aphasia. I edit. Manu Forti
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I have aphasia. I edit. Manu Forti
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post #3373 of 3688

Nice thread,marking it.

Scott

1 puts up with me DW, 3DD's, a few grand kids, a few chicks, a alot of pigeons, a few chicks, a few horses, a few  chicks,  a few dogs, a few more chicks, a few cats, alot of chickens,  alot more chicks, And only 2 acres for all of them to grow, thrive, and have fun on.

 

This time BYC chickens from early 90's, 1st time with Granddad and his layers on his dairy farm back in the 60's

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1 puts up with me DW, 3DD's, a few grand kids, a few chicks, a alot of pigeons, a few chicks, a few horses, a few  chicks,  a few dogs, a few more chicks, a few cats, alot of chickens,  alot more chicks, And only 2 acres for all of them to grow, thrive, and have fun on.

 

This time BYC chickens from early 90's, 1st time with Granddad and his layers on his dairy farm back in the 60's

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post #3374 of 3688
Wish I could have used a trencher to cover my electric line but no I was determined! Have a small Stihl tillerthat I removed the two end tines and used it to dig a 25 ftx 12 inch trench.That lil bugger can dig! Works great for turning over the run too! Crap need to do that again too.
post #3375 of 3688
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinchicky View Post

Wish I could have used a trencher to cover my electric line but no I was determined! Have a small Stihl tillerthat I removed the two end tines and used it to dig a 25 ftx 12 inch trench.That lil bugger can dig! Works great for turning over the run too! Crap need to do that again too.


OMG  I could do that... twelve inches deep is all I need.    Just enough to protect the lines from the  sun.  

 

deb "OFF to look at used tillers on Craigslist"

Past poultry: Buff Brhama, EE, Barred rock, Wellsummer,

Bantam mixes, Araucana, Turkeys, & Guinea Fowl.

Future poultry:  Guinea Fowl, Sumatra, Wellsummer, Muscovy

"A dream without a plan is just a wish" Katherine Paterson

Regarding the horses in our lives

 

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Past poultry: Buff Brhama, EE, Barred rock, Wellsummer,

Bantam mixes, Araucana, Turkeys, & Guinea Fowl.

Future poultry:  Guinea Fowl, Sumatra, Wellsummer, Muscovy

"A dream without a plan is just a wish" Katherine Paterson

Regarding the horses in our lives

 

Reply
post #3376 of 3688
The big outdoor feeder station looks great. How do you keep rodents out at night?
Edited by DeedeesInn - 11/3/15 at 9:02pm
Designer, builder, and now housekeeper of Deedee's Inn
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Designer, builder, and now housekeeper of Deedee's Inn
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post #3377 of 3688
Quote:
Originally Posted by perchie.girl View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinchicky View Post

Wish I could have used a trencher to cover my electric line but no I was determined! Have a small Stihl tillerthat I removed the two end tines and used it to dig a 25 ftx 12 inch trench.That lil bugger can dig! Works great for turning over the run too! Crap need to do that again too.


OMG  I could do that... twelve inches deep is all I need.    Just enough to protect the lines from the  sun.  

deb "OFF to look at used tillers on Craigslist"

My local Home Depot rents 18" deep trenchers for $66 for 4 hours... Here is a trick, rent it about 15-20 minutes before they close and you will have it overnight for the same 4 hour rate, as the hourly rental clock only runs during their business hours... So basically if you rent it about 20 minutes before they close you have it overnight and even for the first 3 1/2 hours the store is open the next day... I do this all the time with their rentals and plan an early morning or late night job, gives you several more hours for the base 4 hour rate and I stress a lot less about the wasted 'delivery' and 'return' time...

Of course anytime you trench have the area surveyed for buried pipes or wires just to be safe...
post #3378 of 3688
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepBeep View Post


My local Home Depot rents 18" deep trenchers for $66 for 4 hours... Here is a trick, rent it about 15-20 minutes before they close and you will have it overnight for the same 4 hour rate, as the hourly rental clock only runs during their business hours... So basically if you rent it about 20 minutes before they close you have it overnight and even for the first 3 1/2 hours the store is open the next day... I do this all the time with their rentals and plan an early morning or late night job, gives you several more hours for the base 4 hour rate and I stress a lot less about the wasted 'delivery' and 'return' time...

Of course anytime you trench have the area surveyed for buried pipes or wires just to be safe...

You can do the same thing with heavy equipment

You rent say, a backhoe for a day, and order it delivered on a Friday. They're not going to come pick it up on a Friday evening, nor Sat or Sun.

Fill a few cans with diesel. Run the machine the allotted 8 hours. Check the fuel level.

Then open up the fuse box, and find the fuse that runs the clock, and remove it.

Use the backhoe all weekend, and get as many projects done as you can. Put enough fuel back in it to bring it back up to where it was when you checked it after 8 hours of use.

Tada! Three days of use for the price of one day and some fuel.

 

Of course, I myself, would never do such a thing, I don't think. 

Well it's, alright now,

I learned my lesson well. See ya,

can't please everyone, so ya,

gotta please yourself.

 

The factory of the future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the man from touching the equipment. ~Warren Bennis~
 

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Well it's, alright now,

I learned my lesson well. See ya,

can't please everyone, so ya,

gotta please yourself.

 

The factory of the future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the man from touching the equipment. ~Warren Bennis~
 

Reply
post #3379 of 3688
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepBeep View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perchie.girl View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinchicky View Post

Wish I could have used a trencher to cover my electric line but no I was determined! Have a small Stihl tillerthat I removed the two end tines and used it to dig a 25 ftx 12 inch trench.That lil bugger can dig! Works great for turning over the run too! Crap need to do that again too.


OMG  I could do that... twelve inches deep is all I need.    Just enough to protect the lines from the  sun.  

deb "OFF to look at used tillers on Craigslist"

My local Home Depot rents 18" deep trenchers for $66 for 4 hours... Here is a trick, rent it about 15-20 minutes before they close and you will have it overnight for the same 4 hour rate, as the hourly rental clock only runs during their business hours... So basically if you rent it about 20 minutes before they close you have it overnight and even for the first 3 1/2 hours the store is open the next day... I do this all the time with their rentals and plan an early morning or late night job, gives you several more hours for the base 4 hour rate and I stress a lot less about the wasted 'delivery' and 'return' time...

Of course anytime you trench have the area surveyed for buried pipes or wires just to be safe...


done it with a post hole digger years ago.  Trouble is My home is sixty miles from the nearest Home Depot  or any equipment rental place.  If I get a beater and mess with it I can leave it set up for every trench I need to do.  So for a couple of hundred dollars I have a multi use tool.

 

I know where my wires are...  They run in a trench from the power pole to the house for a thousand feet.  Property line is another couple of hundred feet from that.

 

I have a hose bib that's across the drive which is about twenty feet wide  And very hard packed.  The only way will be to run water but in line to where I want to start the water line for the chickens then i want to run the line about another 100 feet.  But that driveway is going to be a hard nut to crack...  Hard packed DG that sucks water Even after a down pour its still hard as a rock. 

 

I may still have to do the driveway with a jack hammer.  Sigh    But I can do the run from the coop to my horses water tank... with a modified rototilling device.

 

 

deb

Past poultry: Buff Brhama, EE, Barred rock, Wellsummer,

Bantam mixes, Araucana, Turkeys, & Guinea Fowl.

Future poultry:  Guinea Fowl, Sumatra, Wellsummer, Muscovy

"A dream without a plan is just a wish" Katherine Paterson

Regarding the horses in our lives

 

Reply

Past poultry: Buff Brhama, EE, Barred rock, Wellsummer,

Bantam mixes, Araucana, Turkeys, & Guinea Fowl.

Future poultry:  Guinea Fowl, Sumatra, Wellsummer, Muscovy

"A dream without a plan is just a wish" Katherine Paterson

Regarding the horses in our lives

 

Reply
post #3380 of 3688
Perchie.girl this is the type I have and use. please note the tines are not like the normal tiller tines most people have. They dig like mad through hard dry compacted soil and dried thick layers of chicken poo too. It may bounce some but gets through it.
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